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Schools Which UK University?

  • Thread starter archa1c
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I am trying to decide which university to attend (to study for an Astrophysics BSc)..

I have offers from both Kings College and QMUL (Queen Marys University of London), but i don't know where to go!

Although kings has a better reputation overall, the guardian university guide puts QMUL 7th for physics and Kings 40th (Which is infact last)! However, it looks like the guardians criteria is based heavily on student satisfaction surveys

However in overall scores kings does better on most league tables, and is certainly more prestigious.

Any ideas?
 
55
1
Any ideas?
Yes!

1) Ignore the Guardian league tables.

2) Go to whichever university you like the most (i.e. where you would be happiest to spend 3 - 4 years of your life).

Although some universities have more 'prestige' associated with them, the university you choose for your undergraduate degree doesn't really matter. You'll learn the same basic physics at any UK university. The time to be choosy is when going for postgraduate degrees - it is then that the department and project supervisor matter.

As an example, my BSc was with the Open University (which certainly isn't a 'prestigious' university), and it didn't affect any of my applications for MSc/PhD degrees.
 
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Go to King's College London. In my opinion it has a better reputation and I think will be a more enjoyable university to be at.

Although what jf22901 has said is correct, I think that reputation is an important factor for potential employers when they look at fresh graduates. It is correct that it matters more about what the individual gains from university, but imho KCL will look better on a CV.
 
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... I think that reputation is an important factor for potential employers when they look at fresh graduates.
Yes, that is true. While the reputation of the uni you did your undergrad degree in doesn't matter when applying for MSc's/PhD's, it might affect your chances if you plan on going straight to industry. While academics know a physics degree from either university will be equal, there is more chance of employers being swayed by the 'prestige' factor. So, if you like both equally, pick Kings! :smile:
 
Go to King's College London. In my opinion it has a better reputation and I think will be a more enjoyable university to be at.

Although what jf22901 has said is correct, I think that reputation is an important factor for potential employers when they look at fresh graduates. It is correct that it matters more about what the individual gains from university, but imho KCL will look better on a CV.
I disagree, to an extent. Many employers I have worked with and for, not only do not care about which institution your degree is from, they wouldn't be able to tell the difference. In fact, many industry workers that I know don't even know the difference between a Bsc or an Msci. To them, you have a physics degree - if it's of the 'required' level to satisfy the industry standard requirements, they'll be interested in speaking to you if the rest of your application is good. All industry programmes will involve some sort of training for graduates to bring them up-to-speed in whatever it is the company does - things like work ethic and motivation factor much more than the name of a university.

It's what you learn at university that counts: go to the university where you feel you can be the most productive.
 

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