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Who are the people of physics forums

  1. Feb 4, 2012 #1
    Hey, I am new to physics forums with, as you can see, a small number of posts. But I have read a lot more on these pages than this number conveys. I am wondering if a lot of you guys are professors? You all seem like you have PhD's in physics, and I am really blown away by how much you guys know! Have you learned more about physics in your careers after college? And what careers are you guys in??? Very curious about what seems to me like geniuses here...
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 4, 2012 #2

    Pythagorean

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    Gold Member

    I have only a bs in physics, but am working in experimental neuroscience and doing my MS thesis in computational neuroscience.

    I learned the most reading journals and engaging in discussion with experts (both on PF and at the U) but I am always drawing on skills gathered from long hours of tedious homework problems and well-designed research assignments.
     
  4. Feb 4, 2012 #3

    Bobbywhy

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    I started to love science at around 10 years of age. Although I have attended four universities, I seem to learn more when I "self-study". I am now 68 and am still learning more all the time, especially right here on Physics Forums. It seems like a process that never stops, and is driven by my intense curiosity.
     
  5. Feb 4, 2012 #4
    In one hotly debated point a short time ago, our educational backgrounds (degrees) were taken from our profiles and posted under our avatars. This is no longer the case, but you can generally get into our profiles and find this out if we included this is our creation of profile.
     
  6. Feb 4, 2012 #5
    I've always wondered if any of my professors go on here :)
    I think I like not knowing.
     
  7. Feb 5, 2012 #6

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    I have a PHD in "Wikipedia Linking".
     
  8. Feb 5, 2012 #7

    drizzle

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    :rofl:
     
  9. Feb 5, 2012 #8
    We'll tell you if you tell us what your favorite fish is.
     
  10. Feb 5, 2012 #9

    Deveno

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    bluefin tuna. raw. no, that's not a metaphor.
     
  11. Feb 5, 2012 #10

    jhae2.718

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    I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing...
     
  12. Feb 5, 2012 #11
    My favorite fish? It's gotta be Dorie

    "He's looking for his son, Fabio.."
     
  13. Feb 6, 2012 #12

    Danger

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    No education. I just like to make noise.
     
  14. Feb 6, 2012 #13

    Danger

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    :bugeye:
     
  15. Feb 6, 2012 #14
    I fink I no you.You is the one who learned me how to rite and that.
     
  16. Feb 6, 2012 #15

    Danger

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    :rofl:
     
  17. Feb 6, 2012 #16

    turbo

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    I have no degree. Studied chemical engineering before switching to liberal arts at the urging of my honors mentor (incredible old professor emeritus), worked in construction, and ended up as a process chemist in the world's newest Kraft pulp-mill, then transitioned to a paper-machine operator, and went out into the world after 10 years consulting for paper mills and boiler-houses all over the East and the deep South.

    I had no engineering degree, but carrying $1M in liability insurance (plus professional recommendations from past clients) got me in a lot of doors. It's nice to have so much work that you have to turn some down.

    Professional certifications include a license to operate ClassIV wastewater treatment plants and a certification from the National Board of Opticianry. That was a fun one! After I got certified, all the opticians in the practice studied, tested out and got certified, too. I guess they figured if I could do it after less than 5 months of ~1/2 time experience (I was the network administrator for the practice), they could do it, too.
     
  18. Feb 25, 2012 #17
    I'm another newbie...I've only been here about a month. I am actually not a physics student at all--I found the site when looking for math homework hints. I am a creative writing major and (if all goes according to plan), soon to be a master's student in mathematics. Yeah, my academic background is weird...it's a long story.
     
  19. Feb 25, 2012 #18

    Bobbywhy

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    20Tauri, Welcome to you here at Physics Forums.

    One attribute of our forum is the diversity of its members. Our strengths are additive and the end result is that accurate science gets promulgated. I surely learn new things regularly. Hoping you also have a good experience here.

    Bobbywhy
     
  20. Feb 25, 2012 #19
    Thanks, Bobbywhy.
     
  21. Feb 26, 2012 #20
    PF has about 340,000 members. I'm one of the many PF members who has a non-science degree. I came here through Google, I think, because I wanted to understand Bell's theorem. I didn't post in the non-science forums for quite a while. Now, because I'm satisfied with my understanding of Bell's theorem, the non-science forums (the PF Lounge) are pretty much the only forums I post in. Except once in a while I ask a question in the cosmology forum, etc.

    It's a good question about how many working physicists, professors, and grad students are PF members. I have no idea. I'd guess that there are some bona fide geniuses that occasionally post here. But again, no idea.

    There might be some PF polls on this. Do a search.
     
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