Who has a PhD

  • Thread starter Robert Mak
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  • #1
Robert Mak
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Im just wondering that who has a PhD in this forum?
 

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  • #2
humanino
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I just had one a few weeks ago :smile: (in experimental nuclear physics)
Thank you for reminding me :biggrin:
 
  • #3
Math Is Hard
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I had a PhD once. But he was a whiney guy, so I dumped him.

*bah dum dum shhzz*
 
  • #4
arunma
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I thought I got a PhD in the mail last week. Turns out it was only a couple of BS degrees, so I tossed 'em in a corner.
 
  • #5
Math Is Hard
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I thought I got a PhD in the mail last week. Turns out it was only a couple of BS degrees, so I tossed 'em in a corner.

You couldn't trade up those two BSs for a PhD? What's the world coming to?:eek:
 
  • #6
FaNgS
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i'm just wondering, how long does it usually take to acquire a PhD degree? on average
 
  • #7
Kurdt
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In the Uk its 3 years full time or up to 6 part time which is usual. Of course that's after you've done your masters degree which takes 4 years. Most other places are of a similar time scale.
 
  • #8
FaNgS
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hmm....weird i thought that master's degrees takes 1 to 2 years max and PhD a year maybe, mostly depends on the individual

i'm doing my BSs in chemical engineering still a freshman
 
  • #9
arunma
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You couldn't trade up those two BSs for a PhD? What's the world coming to?:eek:

That's what I told them! You'd think I could trade a couple BS degrees in physics and math for at least one PhD in psychology, or something. It's inflation, I tell ya!

i'm just wondering, how long does it usually take to acquire a PhD degree? on average

If you start straight out of undergrad, it typically takes 4-6 years...probably closer to six than four. But if you get your master's degree first, then you can chop off one to two years from that. That's what all the professors and grad students tell me, anyway.
 
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  • #10
quantumdude
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I don't have one (yet), but many of the PF Mentors do (Doc Al, ZapperZ, ahrkron, vanesch, HallsofIvy,...) I suspect Hurkyl does too, that smart cookie.
 
  • #11
Kurdt
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hmm....weird i thought that master's degrees takes 1 to 2 years max and PhD a year maybe, mostly depends on the individual

i'm doing my BSs in chemical engineering still a freshman

i was talking about doing masters from scratch not after a bachelors
 
  • #12
Evo
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I don't have one (yet), but many of the PF Mentors do (Doc Al, ZapperZ, ahrkron, vanesch, HallsofIvy,...) I suspect Hurkyl does too, that smart cookie.
Moonbear does. Monique and Ian Smith are both close to getting theirs, if they haven't already.
 
  • #14
tehno
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I had a PhD once. But he was a whiney guy, so I dumped him.

*bah dum dum shhzz*
I know that a piece of paper means nothing when it comes to dating. :wink:
 
  • #15
Moonbear
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You'll find that most of the people here with PhDs don't really flaunt it, so might not reply to this thread. That's not what we're here for. (I'm just one of the shameless ones.)
 
  • #16
Math Is Hard
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That's what I told them! You'd think I could trade a couple BS degrees in physics and math for at least one PhD in psychology, or something. It's inflation, I tell ya!

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
(I'm a psych major and that's still funny!)
 
  • #17
humanino
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You'll find that most of the people here with PhDs don't really flaunt it, so might not reply to this thread. That's not what we're here for. (I'm just one of the shameless ones.)
Indeed, it seems to be quite a thing here in USA. For instance, someone who wrote a book might notify that he has a PhD degree, like this would give credit to the book.

Getting PhD is not such a great thing to achieve, it is only time consuming :frown: There is no need to be a genius at least, that's for sure, since they gave me one :tongue2:
 
  • #18
Moonbear
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Indeed, it seems to be quite a thing here in USA. For instance, someone who wrote a book might notify that he has a PhD degree, like this would give credit to the book.

I'm usually suspicious of the credentials of anyone who claims to have a Ph.D. in order to sell a book.
 
  • #19
mathwonk
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gosh i thought it was the hardest thing i ever did.

you guys must be really smart, huh?
 
  • #20
humanino
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gosh i thought it was the hardest thing i ever did.
It's very hard, but mainly requires hard work for a long time.
I would guess that raising children to decent adults is much harder for instance (seriously !)
There are many things I could quote that I represent to myself as more difficult, mainly because good-will and hard work at those matters is not sufficient, things that are so hard that only faith can have you achieve them, things for which one needs a real passion. Working in third-world countries to help people starving, or displaced due to war could be examples. I'm sure that a surgeon working in a ER has much harder times, in particular in terms of stress. The traders I know (well they are young) might make quite a bunch of money, their stress level is over consuming for the health (insomnia...) If a PhD is hard at some times to get results, it also very rewarding at others because one learns so much, well in my experience I alternated between periods. Some things are just hard, not rewarding for the individual.
 
  • #21
Dr Transport
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gosh i thought it was the hardest thing i ever did.

you guys must be really smart, huh?

It was the hardest thing I ever did.....Raising my kids is hard, but I wouldn't do a PhD program ever again.

Of course I had a guy in my department who said "you'll get your degree, you are good with your hand" that is when I was trying to get my degree in experimental physics. I guess I wasn't too good with my hands, I am a theoretician.
 
  • #22
Thrice
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You'll find that most of the people here with PhDs don't really flaunt it, so might not reply to this thread. That's not what we're here for. (I'm just one of the shameless ones.)
Well what are you here for? Puzzles me to hell sometimes. I wouldn't hang around first years & I'm only a fourth year (college). Maybe I should make a post on this.
 
  • #23
Moonbear
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Well what are you here for? Puzzles me to hell sometimes. I wouldn't hang around first years & I'm only a fourth year (college). Maybe I should make a post on this.

To help educate the general public about science, to help inspire students to become good scientists, and to enjoy discussions with other people who enjoy science as much as we do. It's certainly not about flaunting degrees.
 
  • #24
neurocomp2003
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there are open science projects out there to help educate peeople.
I think one is actually called open science. (Do you participate in these Moonbear?).
 
  • #25
Ivan Seeking
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I just had one a few weeks ago :smile: (in experimental nuclear physics)

Do you have all of your romantic encounters in the lab? Or were you saying that this exercise was experimental...? :uhh:
 
  • #26
denverdoc
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:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
(I'm a psych major and that's still funny!)

Last time I looked into this, getting a PhD in experimental psych is very difficult--mainly because getting into such a program is so difficult, harder by a long shot than grad school in general, and in ascending order of rejection rates: law school, med school, and even Vet school. :surprised

Now they have PsyD's etc which is usu a 2 year gig, without a strict dissertation requirement. My ex had one of those. But Brain science these days is not for the faint of heart.

Counseling is more like advanced vocational/OTJ training as the theories don't amt to a hill of beans. I recall some nonsense about degree of difficulty, and supremacy being: social sciences are not on the map, then biology must defer to chemistry, and chemistry to physics, and physics to math, and math to God. Silly. However, making a living demands more from an astrophysicist/cosmologist than as a cosmetoligist. But then they are in lesser demand.:rolleyes:
 
  • #27
Pyrrhus
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a PhD?? :rolleyes:, i have a High School Diploma! (And in about 6 months or so a Bachelor in Science :biggrin: )
 
  • #28
Astronuc
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I started a PhD and did everything but complete a dissertation. I left to get a job (a really excellent job) and start a family. My daughter was 4 months when I started my first job. I stayed enrolled for a semester, but between family and work (a lot of travel), I couldn't find time to complete research.

Maybe some day, I'll go back to school, but at this point a PhD would be a formality. I'd still be doing the same work with or without a PhD. At the moment, the focus is on growing the business and developing new opportunities, while doing some of the most interesting technical work in my field.

That said, I would recommend getting a PhD if one has the opportunity, and before one has a family, unless one has a really good income or a spouse with a really good income. I got married at the end of my undergrad program, completed an MS and started a PhD. There was a certain amount of pressure to settle down since my wife is 6.5 years older. We moved relatively close to her family, which was fine with me.
 
  • #29
humanino
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Do you have all of your romantic encounters in the lab? Or were you saying that this exercise was experimental...? :uhh:
I'm not sure I get the joke, but actually maybe this is not a joke :redface:
Are you making fun of the fact that physics lab gals are ... special ladies ? :yuck:
 
  • #30
Ivan Seeking
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Well, the way that you stated it, it sounded like your romantic interlude took place IN the lab, which I thought may be against school policy.

Just a play on words. :biggrin:
 
  • #31
humanino
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Just a play on words. :biggrin:
Thanks for bearing with my dumbness :redface:
Actually, there's this story [censored] :tongue2:
 
  • #32
Ivan Seeking
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Actually, there's this story [censored] :tongue2:

Hee hee, that reminds of the good ole days on the mobile CAT scanners...[censored]

Seriously though, a big congratulations on getting your Ph.D.
 
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  • #33
Math Is Hard
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Last time I looked into this, getting a PhD in experimental psych is very difficult--mainly because getting into such a program is so difficult, harder by a long shot than grad school in general, and in ascending order of rejection rates: law school, med school, and even Vet school. :surprised

Now they have PsyD's etc which is usu a 2 year gig, without a strict dissertation requirement. My ex had one of those. But Brain science these days is not for the faint of heart.

Counseling is more like advanced vocational/OTJ training as the theories don't amt to a hill of beans. I recall some nonsense about degree of difficulty, and supremacy being: social sciences are not on the map, then biology must defer to chemistry, and chemistry to physics, and physics to math, and math to God. Silly. However, making a living demands more from an astrophysicist/cosmologist than as a cosmetoligist. But then they are in lesser demand.:rolleyes:

denverdoc - we were joking. I am a senior completing a BS in cognitive science. I know a little something about the programs. We were poking fun at those perceived difficulty levels of which you speak.

But to tell you the truth, at the undergrad level, I am sometimes a little jealous of the "general psych" majors because they have fewer requirements than I have in my program. (We have 3 psych undergrad programs here: general, cognitive science, and psychobiology).The psychobio majors probably have to work the hardest out of all of us.
 
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  • #34
tehno
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denverdoc - we were joking. I am a senior completing a BS in cognitive science.
Well,did you learn how to learn then?
:smile:
Sorry,I just couldn't resist no to ask..:cool:
 
  • #35
arunma
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You'll find that most of the people here with PhDs don't really flaunt it, so might not reply to this thread. That's not what we're here for. (I'm just one of the shameless ones.)

Heh, suit yourself. When I get a PhD (which likely won't be for another six years, unfortunately), I'm going to come here and start a thread on every forum to announce it. I will then write in my signature, "I, Dr. Arunma, have been awarded a doctoral degree in physics, and am thus intellectually and morally superior to the rest of you peons. I shall inform you of this superiority by adding the letters 'PhD' every time I so much as sign a check." :rofl:
 

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