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Who has a PhD

  1. Feb 12, 2007 #1
    Im just wondering that who has a PhD in this forum?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 12, 2007 #2
    I just had one a few weeks ago :smile: (in experimental nuclear physics)
    Thank you for reminding me :biggrin:
     
  4. Feb 12, 2007 #3

    Math Is Hard

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    I had a PhD once. But he was a whiney guy, so I dumped him.

    *bah dum dum shhzz*
     
  5. Feb 12, 2007 #4
    I thought I got a PhD in the mail last week. Turns out it was only a couple of BS degrees, so I tossed 'em in a corner.
     
  6. Feb 12, 2007 #5

    Math Is Hard

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    You couldn't trade up those two BSs for a PhD? What's the world coming to?:eek:
     
  7. Feb 13, 2007 #6
    i'm just wondering, how long does it usually take to acquire a PhD degree? on average
     
  8. Feb 13, 2007 #7

    Kurdt

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    In the Uk its 3 years full time or up to 6 part time which is usual. Of course thats after you've done your masters degree which takes 4 years. Most other places are of a similar time scale.
     
  9. Feb 13, 2007 #8
    hmm....weird i thought that master's degrees takes 1 to 2 years max and PhD a year maybe, mostly depends on the individual

    i'm doing my BSs in chemical engineering still a freshman
     
  10. Feb 13, 2007 #9
    That's what I told them! You'd think I could trade a couple BS degrees in physics and math for at least one PhD in psychology, or something. It's inflation, I tell ya!

    If you start straight out of undergrad, it typically takes 4-6 years...probably closer to six than four. But if you get your master's degree first, then you can chop off one to two years from that. That's what all the professors and grad students tell me, anyway.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2007
  11. Feb 13, 2007 #10

    Tom Mattson

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    I don't have one (yet), but many of the PF Mentors do (Doc Al, ZapperZ, ahrkron, vanesch, HallsofIvy,...) I suspect Hurkyl does too, that smart cookie.
     
  12. Feb 13, 2007 #11

    Kurdt

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    i was talking about doing masters from scratch not after a bachelors
     
  13. Feb 13, 2007 #12

    Evo

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    Moonbear does. Monique and Ian Smith are both close to getting theirs, if they haven't already.
     
  14. Feb 13, 2007 #13

    Dr Transport

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    Got mine......
     
  15. Feb 13, 2007 #14
    I know that a piece of paper means nothing when it comes to dating. :wink:
     
  16. Feb 13, 2007 #15

    Moonbear

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    You'll find that most of the people here with PhDs don't really flaunt it, so might not reply to this thread. That's not what we're here for. (I'm just one of the shameless ones.)
     
  17. Feb 13, 2007 #16

    Math Is Hard

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    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
    (I'm a psych major and that's still funny!)
     
  18. Feb 13, 2007 #17
    Indeed, it seems to be quite a thing here in USA. For instance, someone who wrote a book might notify that he has a PhD degree, like this would give credit to the book.

    Getting PhD is not such a great thing to achieve, it is only time consuming :frown: There is no need to be a genius at least, that's for sure, since they gave me one :tongue2:
     
  19. Feb 13, 2007 #18

    Moonbear

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    I'm usually suspicious of the credentials of anyone who claims to have a Ph.D. in order to sell a book.
     
  20. Feb 13, 2007 #19

    mathwonk

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    gosh i thought it was the hardest thing i ever did.

    you guys must be really smart, huh?
     
  21. Feb 13, 2007 #20
    It's very hard, but mainly requires hard work for a long time.
    I would guess that raising children to decent adults is much harder for instance (seriously !)
    There are many things I could quote that I represent to myself as more difficult, mainly because good-will and hard work at those matters is not sufficient, things that are so hard that only faith can have you achieve them, things for which one needs a real passion. Working in third-world countries to help people starving, or displaced due to war could be examples. I'm sure that a surgeon working in a ER has much harder times, in particular in terms of stress. The traders I know (well they are young) might make quite a bunch of money, their stress level is over consuming for the health (insomnia...) If a PhD is hard at some times to get results, it also very rewarding at others because one learns so much, well in my experience I alternated between periods. Some things are just hard, not rewarding for the individual.
     
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