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Who plays GO?

  1. Dec 24, 2009 #1

    Evo

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    Turns out my older daughter, Spawn of Evo has become a competitive GO player. There is a coffee house off campus that has a group of people that play GO in the back. She was amazed to learn that I used to have the game and even remembered how to play. She wants me to get up to speed again and come play in their competitions. :eek:

    Oh my, I haven't played in eons. How popular is GO among the college crowd? I know Humanino plays it. Any elderly players here?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 24, 2009 #2
    I play at a strength of about 7 kyu or so, but don't call me elderly. I'm just ripened.
     
  4. Dec 24, 2009 #3
    What is GO?
     
  5. Dec 24, 2009 #4

    Pengwuino

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    I have a couple of friends who play Go. With that said, I hope that game gets banned from the country.
     
  6. Dec 24, 2009 #5

    Evo

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    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 24, 2009
  7. Dec 24, 2009 #6
    Interesting, I'll have to keep an eye out when I get back to campus.
     
  8. Dec 24, 2009 #7

    D H

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    I played quite a bit in college, then again ten years later, and yet again yet another ten years later. It was just too hard to find opponents in the US. The internet changed that, but somewhere along the line I got too busy with real-life. If your daughter wants some serious challenge, she might want to look into PANDANET, http://www.pandanet.co.jp/English/, or some other internet Go server. There are lots of resources on Go on the net. Sensei's library, http://senseis.xmp.net/, is very good and very extensive.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  9. Dec 24, 2009 #8

    turbo

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    I played a bit in college, but fell in love with chess, and got stronger there and had more fun. It was easy to get a pick-up speed chess game between classes.
     
  10. Dec 24, 2009 #9

    dlgoff

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    Go looks interesting. It would probably be easier to learn by having someone to show you as you play.

    Anyone ever play mastermind? I use to play the deluxe game with 8 colors and 5 holes. Not as challenging as chess however.
     
  11. Dec 24, 2009 #10

    Evo

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    Yes, that's how she learned. You've got to play it to learn it. Then an ability to think ahead several moves and an ability to drive your opponents moves to where you want them to go is must. I started by playing Pente. I was awesome at Pente, much simpler, but very similar. And since I prefer winning, I still prefer Pente.
     
  12. Dec 24, 2009 #11

    fluidistic

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    I used to play Go on the Internet some months ago. I was rated about 10 kyu (not a great rating, but for 1-2 months of playing that's a "good" progress) in KGS, a Go Internet server. I know some chess players leave chess for Go, although the I've never heard of the opposite. It wasn't my case, I was between both games, but I'd always favor chess.
     
  13. Dec 24, 2009 #12

    Chi Meson

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    When I lived in Portland, mid-90s, we'd frequent Powell's Books and hang out in the coffee shop. Every now and then, the Go players came and set up for a tournament.

    Scary, scary...

    smelly too.
     
  14. Dec 24, 2009 #13
    I used to play with a friend of mine. Most of my friends hated it because they didn't have the patience to learn and hated losing. For a while there was a homeless veteran that came around the coffeehouse I worked at and we played off and on. He was damn good, compared to me anyway. But yeah, I've met a grand total of three other people who played and have not played now in years.

    To know that a woman enjoys the game is really nice. I've met few women who had the patience to even learn chess.
     
  15. Dec 24, 2009 #14
    Oh I love go. I wanted to make that as a career when I was 9, I had lessons for a 2 years too. Now I suck. :yuck:

    It's a great game. There's so much involved. Thinking, memorization, creating feelings...
     
  16. Dec 25, 2009 #15
    Computer can beat us at chess by sheer force. There is a lot of emotion and intuition in GO. The best aspect which convinced me chess is a feudal game is that one can win by 1 point out of (potentially) 360. This is much more subtle than simply getting to the king. Most importantly, this allows for players of different strength to really enjoy a game together.

    One can reduce the 19x19 board to a much faster game by the way.
     
  17. Dec 25, 2009 #16
    ya some times I get really emotional when playing go, it effects your thinking. And sometimes you see a really tricky move its hard not to smile. :) I think go is the hardest board game.

    There's a lot of memorization to it too. Anyone who's good have to memorize hundreds of opening, hundreds of games others played. Thousands of tricks. The amount of information is insane. Feelings are very important to, there no time to think of every possibility, good intuition saves and energy. Plus I don't think there's any other games where you have to think 50-200 moves(in total).
     
  18. Dec 25, 2009 #17

    sylas

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    I play at about 14 kyu. Which means I am much weaker than jimmysnyder on 7 kyu. It is a brilliant game; the rules are so simple; and the strategies so complex.

    Cheers -- sylas
     
  19. Dec 25, 2009 #18
    I just tried playing it on yahoo and now I hate it. I went from not knowing what it was to hating it in like 10 minutes.
     
  20. Dec 25, 2009 #19

    Evo

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    LOL, it's not a game to play online, a large part of it is watching your opponent, watching which stones he's looking at, gives you a clue as to what moves he might be planning and gives you clues as to which stones he doesn't want you to move.
     
  21. Dec 25, 2009 #20

    D H

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    I disagree. While Go is just a terrible game to learn online, it is a great game to play online, particularly so if you are from the West. You can play a game against someone who uses old school tactics and then switch gears and find some Korean opponent (very aggressive play).

    Besides, if you focus on your opponents eyes you will miss seeing the eyes (or lack thereof) on the board.
     
  22. Dec 25, 2009 #21

    Evo

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    Good one D H! I remember getting my first Go board and had never played it. I started reading the instructions and had to have an adult beverage.

    I think if you're good at it, online would work, but I haven't played in ages, I need to rely on my ability to read my opponents body language.

    I think I personally would find it harder to play online. My daughter sent me a link to play Pente online, but it's just not the same for me. I like moving my hand towards a stone and then glancing at my opponent's face to see how they react.
     
  23. Dec 25, 2009 #22
    Maybe I should play online. I once lost a game just because my opponent had a tic in his eye.
     
  24. Dec 25, 2009 #23

    sylas

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    There are advantages to playing online...

    I have a great story about playing online Go. I guy I knew, many years ago, used to play online. He was pretty good too... ranking 2 kyu, I believe.

    I didn't actually know he played Go. I knew him because he was active in the creationism/evolution discussions at talk.origins. His name was Tero Sand, and he lived in Finland, so I only knew him online. He was a very good at debating this subject; really knew his stuff. In fact, when the famous talkorigins web site started up back in the early 1990s sometime, it start out mostly with files that Tero had collected or written for explaining the subject.

    At Go he was well known around the world with online players.

    And then, very suddenly, Tero died. It came as a shock to lots of people; both online Go players around the world and the talkorigins people.

    It was only at this point that many of us became aware of something about Tero that was not general knowledge; though many of his closer friends were aware. Tero was a quadriplegic, relying on a respirator to breathe. He used a system set up by his father, where he could control a computer with a stick and his mouth; and this was how he lived and communicated with the entire world.

    In particular, this was how he could play Go.

    Cheers -- sylas
     
  25. Dec 25, 2009 #24

    tiny-tim

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    Advantages of go over chess …

    i] simplicity of rules, which are
    a) players play alternately
    b) all pieces (stones) are the same, and a play consists of placing one stone on any vacant point
    c) a stone or group of stones is removed from the board (captured) if all its adjacent points are occupied by stones of the opponent, at the end of the opponent's move
    d) the game ends when neither player wishes to play further, and then the winner is the one with the greater number of vacant points surrounded, minus the number of his stones captured
    e) (and there's a rule about forcing a draw by repetition)

    ii] the handicap system means that players of fairly widely different ability can have a fair game (in chess, that can only be achieved by eg one player starting a piece down)

    iii] it's more strategic, with much less importance attached to "looking several moves ahead" than in chess, and much more importance to "feeling the force" :wink: (and so computers are much better at chess than go)

    iv] it teaches a few useful life-tricks, such as "if you can see your opponent's best move, then it's often your best move also"

    I got as far as 9kyu, and stuck there basically because I couldn't "see the future" :rolleyes:

    Soooo … is Greg going to give us a go forum, then? :smile:
     
  26. Dec 25, 2009 #25

    fluidistic

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    Ahahah for the Go forum.
    Dear tiny-tim, I don't see all the points as advantages, rather as differences. The only advantage I see is point ii].
    i]Chess rules aren't hard to learn, an "average" 4 years old kid can do it. (The same apply for Go, except maybe for counting at the end... but almost).
    ii]I agree, Go here has an advantage.
    iii]True about computers. I don't agree with "looking several moves ahead". There are many situations that requires it, if not any situation except maybe the beginning of the game (though in some games it is also required at this stage). In addition I agree with "feeling the force". I'd call it "intuition". Go indeed involves more intuition. I think it's because of its complexity... so many moves to chose from, much more than in chess, in average.
    iv]"if you can see your opponent's best move, then it's often your best move also" is maybe more "if you can see your best move, then it's often the best move for your opponent". But I don't see this as an advantage, rather as a difference from chess.


    Edit: An advantage of Go online VS chess online : You can't use a Go chess engine to help you (cheating) if you are over 1 Dan approximately. Because this is the strength of current engines, approximately.
    While in chess you can use many (Rybka, Deep Shredder, Crafty, Hiarcs, etc.) chess engines to beat any human, grand masters included.
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2009
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