Whole the world is the

  • #1

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"Whole the world is the theater and we are actors on its scene".
I guess that words of W. Shekspire are more deeper then we are thinking and (it is possible) he was bored in mind.

Michael.
 

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  • #2
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Michael Dmitriyev said:
"Whole the world is the theater and we are actors on its scene".
I guess that words of W. Shekspire are more deeper then we are thinking and (it is possible) he was bored in mind.

Michael.
it's just a simple analogy. not a clever one, but popular one. it is valuable because said by Sheakspeare. if it was said by J. Papalini - nobody would know that...
 
  • #3
HallsofIvy
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That is also not exactly what Shakespeare said: looks like a translation into another language (Russian?) and then back again.

"All the world's a stage and men and women merely actors."
 
  • #4
arildno
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0°0'0" said:
it's just a simple analogy. not a clever one, but popular one. it is valuable because said by Sheakspeare. if it was said by J. Papalini - nobody would know that...
If J.Papalini had said it to me, I would have thought it was a good analogy just as well.
 
  • #5
honestrosewater
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It's actually a pretty long analogy, or maybe more correctly, an extended metaphor, and I think it's quite chilling.
" Jaq. All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players: 148
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms. 152
And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel,
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woful ballad 156
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation 160
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lin’d,
With eyes severe, and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances; 164
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipper’d pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,
His youthful hose well sav’d, a world too wide 168
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history, 172
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything." -source
He uses this elsewhere, in Macbeth's "Tomorrow, tomorrow, and tomorrow" soliloquy and in a couple sonnets.
Michael,
can you explain what you mean by "bored in mind"?
 
  • #6
Thanks for citing, honestrosewater. Obviously Shakespeare has related these words to physiological changes and connected to them the social roles of the person during his life.
I suggest to consider these words in the other context:
Whether really the world is the theatre which was constructed specially for the person playing?
 
  • #7
honestrosewater
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Michael Dmitriyev said:
I suggest to consider these words in the other context:
Whether really the world is the theatre which was constructed specially for the person playing?
You're talking about solipsism?
 
  • #8
arildno
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"And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel,
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. "
Anyone who doesn't find this a brilliant image, doesn't know what art is (or has forgotten what it is to be a boy).
 
  • #9
No. I am considering the world is really exist independently of human mind, but it has any sense for human only and appropriated namely for one.
If someone decide to build a house with a lot of equipment then this one suppose, or more precisely, he sure who'll live here. This equipment is incomprehensible and does not demand for anybody except of inhabitant to come.
 
  • #10
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Michael Dmitriyev said:
I am considering the world is really exist independently of human mind, but it has any sense for human only and appropriated namely for one.
If someone decide to build a house with a lot of equipment then this one suppose, or more precisely, he sure who'll live here. This equipment is incomprehensible and does not demand for anybody except of inhabitant to come.
What you are trying to say - could it be similar to Einstein's thoughts here :

"The human mind is not capable of grasping the Universe. We are like a little child entering a huge library. The walls are covered to the ceilings with books in many different tongues. The child knows that someone must have written these books. It does not know who or how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. But the child notes a definite plan in the arrangement of the books---a mysterious order which it does not comprehend, but only dimly suspects."
A Einstein

In other words - the world seems rational and yet incomprehensible to humans. Humans look upon this incomprehensibility and wonder - was it designed this way, and why?

Alternatively, maybe it is simply the case that human minds are not sufficiently developed to comprehend all mysteries, and at the same time the human mind has evolved an ability to "jump to easy conclusions" when it cannot find a rational answer.

MF
:smile:
 

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