Why are CFC-gases inert?

  • Thread starter Chem.Stud.
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I've been thinking about this for some time now, and I can't find anything specific on it on the interwebs.

Clearly, these gases are very stable, or else they would react. But why stable? Can it really be so beneficial for, let's say, 1,2-dichloro-3,4-difluoromethane to have so kany electronegative atoms bonded to the carbon? The molecule would be very polar with a relatively big plsitive charge on the carbon atom. I would think that one of the halogens would make a good leaving group in substitution...

I'm lost, could someone please help me out? :)
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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I think it has to be with very strong bonds between C and the halogens. The halogens are pulling very much on the electrons, which makes the molecule very polar, and the bonds very strong.

But if someone else could confirm, and go a little more in-depth, you'd probably be better off. What's the bond enthalpies for a "normal" CFC? For CFC-11, for example?
 
  • #3
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I've been thinking about this for some time now, and I can't find anything specific on it on the interwebs.

Clearly, these gases are very stable, or else they would react. But why stable? Can it really be so beneficial for, let's say, 1,2-dichloro-3,4-difluoromethane to have so kany electronegative atoms bonded to the carbon? The molecule would be very polar with a relatively big plsitive charge on the carbon atom. I would think that one of the halogens would make a good leaving group in substitution...

I'm lost, could someone please help me out? :)
They are characterized by strong carbon–fluorine bonds
 

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