Why are people like this these days

~christina~
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hm:frown:

I hurt myself...I was walking a little fast trying to walk around this woman in front of me and I lost my balance and then I ended up landing on the sidewalk on my right side in the rain.. and then I stayed there on the ground for a few minutes since I wasn't sure how I got there (a little stunned but I thought I was alright) But in the end I found out why my knee hurt since my whole leg got all wet on one side and my jeans were sticking to my cut on my knee. (cut my jeans on the sidewalk as well)
and the point of this thread is that no one helped me up so.(I was there on the ground for a minute or two..Then I just picked myself up and and ran to catch a bus because that's what I was trying to do in the first place.

why are people like this these days?
 
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Evo
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Sorry to hear you were hurt, are you ok?

Hard to believe that no one made an effort to help you. I always stop and help people. Yesterday at the store a woman and her daughter were pushing an overloaded shoping cart (they had a huge storage box under the cart) and it fell out. I stopped and put it back and rearranged things to be more stable. They were very thankful but probably wondering "why is this crazy woman picking up our stuff and fixing our cart?"
 
Moonbear
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Wow, that is kind of surprising that nobody stopped to help. Maybe you got up quicker than you thought. I don't know if I'd have necessarily helped you up, but I certainly would have stopped to ask if you were okay after seeing a fall like that...your answer to my question would determine whether I'd help you up, let you get yourself up, or make you stay on the ground lying still while I got you further help.
 
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People are afraid of lawsuits.
 
wolram
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I would help any one up, so long as they were not foaming from the mouth.
 
~christina~
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Kurdt
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I don't know why. In societies with ever increasing numbers of people perhaps a lot of us have lost our empathy for one another. Especially due to the competitiveness commercialism instills.
 
~christina~
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Sorry to hear you were hurt, are you ok?

Hard to believe that no one made an effort to help you. I always stop and help people. Yesterday at the store a woman and her daughter were pushing an overloaded shoping cart (they had a huge storage box under the cart) and it fell out. I stopped and put it back and rearranged things to be more stable. They were very thankful but probably wondering "why is this crazy woman picking up our stuff and fixing our cart?"
Thanks Evo your very nice
I think I'm fine but my knee sort of has a pain when I prop it up on something. I thought I only had a cut..
well it's true that people are like that sometimes (someone walked right past me)
Of course I would help someone but people here are strange to say the least.

Wow, that is kind of surprising that nobody stopped to help. Maybe you got up quicker than you thought. I don't know if I'd have necessarily helped you up, but I certainly would have stopped to ask if you were okay after seeing a fall like that...your answer to my question would determine whether I'd help you up, let you get yourself up, or make you stay on the ground lying still while I got you further help.
maybe I did..I was in a hurry.:rolleyes:

Well it wasn't that serious that you'd need to call medical personal.

I don't know why. In societies with ever increasing numbers of people perhaps a lot of us have lost our empathy for one another. Especially due to the competitiveness commercialism instills.
yes, maybe so. People are always in a hurry and buisness comes first. (a person who walked past me was a man in a buisness suit and who was holding a briefcase)
 
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I carried another student in her wheel chair up a snowwy/icy hill once when her chair slipped off the sidewalk and went wayyyy down a hill in a ditch, but I think that is the only time my conscience has ever kicked in. I remember chasing her down the hill while other people just walked by. Besides that one incident, I think I was born without a sympathy gene.
 
Moonbear
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maybe I did..I was in a hurry.:rolleyes:
I asked because it could be that people just didn't have a chance to really react or were instead trying to be polite by pretending not to notice your clumsiness.

A couple years ago when I visited SpaceTiger, a guy crashed his bike right just a few yards away from us. We were both a bit slow to react...there was sort of a momentary, OMG did that just happen, pause, and then a, OK, he's not getting right back up thought, then finally we regained our wits and walked over to see if he needed assistance...and by then, two of his buddies on bikes behind him arrived and he was sitting up on the curb taking stock of his injuries and decided he was okay to be assisted away by his buddies. So, while it sure would have looked like nobody noticed or cared, it was really just that we were darn slow to react to the realization that he might actually be injured and need help.
 
Astronuc
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hm:frown:

I hurt myself...I walking a little fast trying to walk around this woman in front of me and I lost my balance and then I ended up landing on the sidewalk on my right side in the rain.. and then I stayed there on the ground for a few minutes since I wasn't sure how I got there (a little stunned but I thought I was alright) But in the end I found out why my knee hurt since my whole leg got all wet on one side and my jeans were sticking to my cut on my knee. (cut my jeans on the sidewalk as well)
and the point of this thread is that no one helped me up so.(I was there on the ground for a minute or two..Then I just picked myself up and and ran to catch a bus because that's what I was trying to do in the first place.

why are people like this these days?
Sorry to hear about your accident, Christina. I would have stopped to help you up. I usually stop and offer assistance if someone's in trouble - especially if some is in danger.

I think many folks are afraid to get involved.
 
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Don't lose faith in humanity over this incident. Most people are eager to help. Once I tripped when I was climbing the steps to the Met in NYC and people came at me from every direction to help me up and ask if I was all right. I myself am so willing to help others in such situations that I trip them just for the chance to do so.
 
~christina~
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Sorry to hear about your accident, Christina. I would have stopped to help you up. I usually stop and offer assistance if someone's in trouble - especially if some is in danger.

I think many folks are afraid to get involved.
Thanks Astronuc I know you would.

Don't lose faith in humanity over this incident.
I won't since I know that most people would help but I'm irritated that people where I live would do this since I've always seen people help others out everywhere else
Most people are eager to help. Once I tripped when I was climbing the steps to the Met in NYC and people came at me from every direction to help me up and ask if I was all right.
That's because you must have been in a tourist area:wink:
I myself am so willing to help others in such situations that I trip them just for the chance to do so.
:rofl:...I think I'd sue you if you did that
 
Moonbear
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Don't lose faith in humanity over this incident. Most people are eager to help. Once I tripped when I was climbing the steps to the Met in NYC and people came at me from every direction to help me up and ask if I was all right.
Well, I definitely don't doubt they came at you from every direction, but that will happen just sitting on the steps, especially if you're in the path between the doors and the hot dog cart. :biggrin:
 
Math Is Hard
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I'm surprised they didn't help you. What a bunch of self-absorbed butt heads! :frown:

Your incident reminded me of an experiment we did in a social psychology class where we had to "accidentally" drop a bunch of pencils in a crowded area and observe who helped. Pretty much everyone in our class noticed that females are more likely to both give help and receive help. (Myself, I actually had pretty good luck with the guys when I dropped the pencils - I think maybe because I am older and they thought they were helping a teacher.) The guys almost never got help from other guys. In one case, one of the male students from our class wasn't even planning a "drop" and a group of guys happened to bump into him and scatter his pencils. They saw the whole thing happen, and knew it was their fault. But they kept on walking!
 
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Moonbear
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(Myself, I actually had pretty good luck with the guys when I dropped the pencils - I think maybe because I am older and they thought they were helping a teacher.)
How low-cut or loose was your shirt when you were bent over picking up pencils? :biggrin:

I don't usually bother helping someone pick up stuff they dropped unless their arms are full or are trying to keep track of a bunch of kids at the same time...something that makes me think they can't easily do it themselves, or if I don't think they saw what they dropped. Otherwise, unless it's a really hot guy I want to meet, I figure people can handle something like that on their own.
 
~christina~
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I asked because it could be that people just didn't have a chance to really react or were instead trying to be polite by pretending not to notice your clumsiness.

A couple years ago when I visited SpaceTiger, a guy crashed his bike right just a few yards away from us. We were both a bit slow to react...there was sort of a momentary, OMG did that just happen, pause, and then a, OK, he's not getting right back up thought, then finally we regained our wits and walked over to see if he needed assistance...and by then, two of his buddies on bikes behind him arrived and he was sitting up on the curb taking stock of his injuries and decided he was okay to be assisted away by his buddies. So, while it sure would have looked like nobody noticed or cared, it was really just that we were darn slow to react to the realization that he might actually be injured and need help.
I guess it's the same shock factor. I actually landed flat on the floor, but luckily I didn't land on my face but the side of my head was on the floor. The fact I also had my coat's hat (nice and thick) on, which protected my head from injury was also lucky or it could have been worse. :frown:

I'm surprised they didn't help you. What a bunch of self-absorbed butt heads! :frown:
the woman behind me and the guy in front who I saw just casually walking toward me while I was flat on the floor fit the description you gave.

Your incident reminded me of an experiment we did in a social psychology class where we had to "accidentally" drop a bunch of pencils in a crowded area and observe who helped. Pretty much everyone in our class noticed that females are more likely to both give help and receive help. (Myself, I actually had pretty good luck with the guys when I dropped the pencils - I think maybe because I am older and they thought they were helping a teacher.) The guys almost never got help from other guys. In one case, one of the male students from our class wasn't even planning a "drop" and a group of guys happened to bump into him and scatter his pencils. They saw the whole thing happen, and knew it was their fault. But they kept on walking!
I think it's easier to pick up something someone dropped like a pencil though. (I think I'm larger than a pencil :biggrin:
 
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Personally, I wish I was the type of person you described. I've always shot myself in the foot by being overly selfless.
 
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Sorry to hear that, Christina, I hope that the bruises heal fast.

I think that whether or nor not bystanders help is well studied. It seems to be inversely proportional to the number of bystanders. If it's only one, he/she is very likely going to help, when there are dozens, they are more likely to think that some of the other will help; there must be somebody there with an first aid diploma, he'd better do it.

Our organization has a code of conduct, which obligates the members to assist in such a case. It seems to help, there are several *heroic* stories.
 
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Well, I definitely don't doubt they came at you from every direction, but that will happen just sitting on the steps, especially if you're in the path between the doors and the hot dog cart. :biggrin:
I decided to put this hypothesis to the test. I went to the Met and randomly tripped people as they climbed the steps. Little old ladies with canes are the easiest targets, but there are so few of them willing to make the ascent. I found the joy of tripping was interfering with my objectivity, so I hired a couple of thugs to take care of this matter. Then I timed the people who were making for the hot dog carts. There are two of them now, one at either side of the stairs. This complicates the math and adds an element of the 'salesman' problem into the mix, but I was undaunted. It turns out that those who helped people up got their red hots a full .3 seconds sooner than those who stepped over them on average. I conclude that the proper way to induce human kindness is to make people realize that it is in their best interest to help their fellows.
 
People are afraid of lawsuits.
Roughly translated as: people are selfish idiots, only concerned about their own well being, isn't that?

That said it's also the big city effect, in London it's almost impossible to make eye contact with someone let alone make some sort of physical contact. Where I live, it's actually quite possible that as you walk down the road someone will say good morning to you. It seems to be that human interaction beyond those you know is inversely proportional to the population in an area. As ironic as that is, that seems to be the way it is.

In real life I've seen an old woman fall over, and an old man collapse dead from a heart attack, both of which I'm glad to say I helped well as much as I could, the old guy was dead before he hit the ground. If you don't then as far as I'm concerned you are an arsehole quite frankly, wherever you live.

I personally don't care how many people are about, if no one stops to help then there all guilty of one of the worst of crimes, being indifferent to peoples suffering/problems/situation. If one person stops to help and that is sufficient then fine, if two then fine, if you're first on the scene and it's you: even better.
 
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Moonbear
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Little old ladies with canes are the easiest targets,
I'm not so sure of that. Those canes can really hurt when they whack you with them.

Though, reminds me of an old cartoon of two boyscouts practically carrying a little old lady with a cane across the street (supposedly boyscouts are supposed to help little old ladies cross streets). They get to the other side, and she start whacking the both of them with the cane. Turned out, she was just standing at the corner waiting for someone and didn't actually want to cross the street.
 
~christina~
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Sorry to hear that, Christina, I hope that the bruises heal fast.
Thanks Andre, I hope so too. :smile:
I think that whether or nor not bystanders help is well studied. It seems to be inversely proportional to the number of bystanders. If it's only one, he/she is very likely going to help, when there are dozens, they are more likely to think that some of the other will help; there must be somebody there with an first aid diploma, he'd better do it.

Our organization has a code of conduct, which obligates the members to assist in such a case. It seems to help, there are several *heroic* stories.
well maybe that's true but there were only 2 bystanders..and while my head was still touching the floor I was watching this man walk slowly towards me, no sense of an emergency:rolleyes:

That code of conduct should be madatory everywhere
 
~christina~
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That said it's also the big city effect, in London it's almost impossible to make eye contact with someone let alone make some sort of physical contact. Where I live, it's actually quite possible that as you walk down the road someone will say good morning to you. It seems to be that human interaction beyond those you know is inversely proportional to the population in an area. As ironic as that is, that seems to be the way it is.
I've noticed that when your in a smaller town and not a city people are willing to help you out much more than if you live in the latter.
 
I've noticed that when your in a smaller town and not a city people are willing to help you out much more than if you live in the latter.
That's not my experience, but, meh.

Yeah they may at least notice you though, in my experience. :smile:
 

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