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Why are women not interested in problem solving?

  1. Jul 20, 2008 #1
    Hi, I'm a 17 year old male who has some questions about the women today. I have a passion for maths, programming, engineering and science. Being a heterosexual male in search of a suitable partner, I'm finding it very hard to find a girl who likes the same things as me. In fact I have seen none in my search. Most of the girls today have the princess attitude towards life and feel that others should do things for them while they do nothing productive. They are very unoriginal and many of the things they say and do is taken from latest movies and TV shows (the type I would never waste my time watching becuase I have much better things to do.) The girls act very hostile towards science and particularly despise mathematics.

    When I do find a girl who might be intelligent it is when she is doing some degree in a college or university. Even then it those girls don't have the same passion that I have towards science and tel me they are just doing this to get a degree. They do not take part in any science activities outside their course. And many of them become very arrogant when hey complete a degree and act as if they are superior.
     
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  3. Jul 20, 2008 #2

    Monique

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    We're not all like that :wink:

    You're only 17 years old, wait a few years when you're attending university and you'll find more people who share your interests.
     
  4. Jul 20, 2008 #3

    arildno

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    Easy.
    Men like to probe things, women like to chat about them. :smile:
     
  5. Jul 20, 2008 #4

    Redbelly98

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    Hello Sam,

    Let me just say that (1) those type of women are out there, and (2) it's good to have some other interests outside of math/science/engineering, you might just find somebody some day that you can share these other interests with.

    And don't worry, it took me until about age 40 to find my wife!

    Regards,

    Mark
     
  6. Jul 20, 2008 #5

    Moonbear

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    Let me ask you this...how many men your age do you know who share such passion for those interests? If you think about it that way, you'll realize it's not that women aren't interested in those things, but rather that a fairly small percentage of ALL people share such interests. And, of course if you're only 17 and trying to chase after college-aged women, you're going to run into troubles of them looking down on you as "still a kid." Wait until you are in college yourself, and those women will be easy to find in your classes with you.

    You might also want to expand your horizons a bit. There are women who are passionate about careers or interests/learning other than sciences who will be very compatible with a man passionate about sciences simply because they will understand the hard work, long hours, career-oriented motivation, etc.

    At 17, though, most people of both sexes are still very superficial in their interests. They haven't yet discovered their passions in life, aren't independent enough to be motivated to work for what they want, and are still enjoying playing and being kids. Give them time. You just may be ahead of the curve there...and who knows, your own interests might change. I know a guy who got all the way to his senior year in college thinking his passion was math and physics, then it dawned on him that he was just doing it because he was good at it, not because it really interested him. He ended up going to graduate school in linguistics...that ended up being his true passion.
     
  7. Jul 20, 2008 #6
    Honestly there seem to be a disproportionatly small number of women who are interested in math, sciences, and 'problem solving'. Very possibly because of societal generalizations in this regard.


    One of my biggest crushes was a girl who asked me to teacher her to play chess though. *drool*
     
  8. Jul 20, 2008 #7

    Monique

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    I know enough people who don't have a passion or maths, programming, engineering and science, but you can still have great conversations with them on these subject matters. Don't limit yourself by only associating yourself with people who have the same kind of 'obsession' as you, look for people who appreciate a good conversation on any subject matter.
     
  9. Jul 20, 2008 #8
    Men and women have different brains. It starts in the womb. It's amplified by how they are raised.
     
  10. Jul 20, 2008 #9

    Lisa!

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    Men are also interested in causing problems not solving them!:wink:
     
  11. Jul 20, 2008 #10
    And women seem to be rather creative at finding problems. ;-p
     
  12. Jul 20, 2008 #11
    I agree--

    It's nice if you do find such a woman, but if you limit yourself to those things, it's about the same as limiting yourself to finding a woman because you have pre-determined that she has to 'look' a certain way, eliminating all others. The more open minded, the more the chance of meeting one that you get along with.
     
  13. Jul 20, 2008 #12

    G01

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    I have to agree with previous posters who have responded to your post.

    1. You seem to just be more mature than most people you are around all day. It is not just that the women you are around are shallow and have no serious interests. It is just that many of the people you see everyday have not yet matured enough to find those passions you already have. Your peers have yet to realize how shallow and small the high school world is. But most people eventually grow up and want more from life than partying and no responsibilities. (I stress most people:rolleyes:)

    Even when you get to college, there will still be many people who are still in that playing/partying stage of life. (They will be the ones doing keg stands:biggrin:) But don't worry, you'll find many more people with similar interests and passions as you move on to college.

    2. I also agree that you shouldn't limit yourself to science folk. There are many people who are passionate about things other than science who you will be able to relate to based off of that. They will help you broaden your horizons and you will help them broaden theirs. Don't count them out just because they are not scientists.
     
  14. Jul 20, 2008 #13

    ~christina~

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    Blasphemy!
    What if the girl already knows how to play chess? She wouldn't be interesting anymore, eh?
     
  15. Jul 20, 2008 #14
    How do you know that "many of them become very arrogant when they complete a degree and act as if they are superior?" You're 17 btw.
     
  16. Jul 20, 2008 #15

    dst

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    Women are very interested in problem creation, however. Ba dum tsch :biggrin:
     
  17. Jul 20, 2008 #16
    I have several female friends in physics and all of them are cool. The few that have already gotten their degrees don't act superior at all.
     
  18. Jul 21, 2008 #17

    Defennder

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    Well before this thread turns into "bash-the-male-chauvinist thread", I think it's worth inquiring why is it guys largely outnumber girls in engineering courses. I think the same can be said of computer science, judging from what I've seen. I don't know about maths and physics majors, so does anyone know the gender enrolment ratio in these majors?
     
  19. Jul 21, 2008 #18
    Its probably because of cultural demoralization and social roles...and it could also be biological (not sure).

    For the sake of argumentation:
    -Make a list of 5 famous (or simply historically known) male scientists (including computer scientists), engineers, and mathematicians right off the back of your head (the 5 can be a mixture of these).
    -Do the same with women
    -If one is able to come up with a list of 5 males and 5 females...then you might start making a point about something.
    -Do not use the internets, books, or any information source...just use what you have so far equipped into your mind.
     
  20. Jul 21, 2008 #19

    Defennder

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    Are females ever discouraged by their family and peers from majoring in engineering and computer science? Personally I'm not aware of any such cases.
     
  21. Jul 21, 2008 #20

    Math Is Hard

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    I knew a young lady in my programming class who was incredibly fast and adept. She beat the daylights out of us on all the assignments. She was also so beautiful that every head would turn when she walked in the room.

    She confided to me one day that she was embarrassed in high school about her high math scores, and would always hide her tests when the teacher gave them back. She was very popular and didn't want her peers (especially guys) to know that she was a math whiz. She didn't want everyone to think she was a "geek", or hate her for messing up the curve.

    I wonder if guys ever feel that sort of embarrassment, or have to hide their intelligence to maintain social status.
     
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