Why atoms come together

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Hi all.

I was hoping you mat be able to help me with a question.

If matter is made up of atoms, why do these atoms come together to form different matter? For example, why do some atoms form a brain whilst others form skin? How do these atoms know, if you like, what to form?

Why do some atoms form rock whilst others from a tree?

Sorry if it's a ridiculous question! But thanks in advance for your time.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
alxm
Science Advisor
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You might want to start with a book on chemistry?
 
  • #3
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Or biology if you want to know how bodies are formed from DNA.
 
  • #4
Sorry for my bad english.

Your question it's not ridiculous at all.
I think that the answer is more complex than jump from the atoms to a tree to explain how atoms come together for made what we call a tree, and specifically how the matter maintains its form despite of other atoms in contact with that tree, i recommend u begin reading about atoms, how they come together to form essential elements, next how they form molecules, how these molecules interact each other, how they form more complex elements, and finally how macro elements are made.

I'm not an expert in this topic but i hope i've helped u.
 
  • #5
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atomic bonds are like incredibly short stubby arms, with incredible strength...considering how much energy is contained in matter, it makes sense that atoms are capable of grabbing onto other atoms...from there it's just patterns that work optimally in different situations/environments
 
  • #6
Thanks for the replies.

Do we know why atoms form skin, for example, rather than forming hair, for example? Why some form one thing but not another. Is this DNA? If so, what gives the atoms in DNA the ability to pick and choose how they develop?

Also, what gives the connection of atoms their final result? Why does say a collection of atoms look like, feel like and operate as hair but another collection of atoms look like, feel like and operate as brain, for example? What makes some atoms form as rock? Can those same atoms which from a rock form a tree?

Sorry to go on! Please feel free to pick and choose which parts you want to answer! Thanks!
 
  • #7
1,006
105
Not all atoms are the same: there are many different kinds of atoms, called http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_element" [Broken] are two fields that look at how this works.

Living matter is particularly complex, composed of many many many different kinds of chemical compounds. Living things are made of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cell_(biology)" [Broken] into many kinds of cells (skin, stomach, eyeball, etc.). While we know a lot, I believe that all this biological stuff is not yet completely understood: many researchers are currently sifting through the vast complexity of the chemistry within cells and trying to figure out how it all works.

Wikipedia is an excellent way to educate yourself (click the links above, and then click the links on those pages...). Or if you're interested I bet you could find a popular science book at the bookstore that would explain this well.
 
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  • #8
Thanks very much for the reply.

It's certainly a complex yet very interesting subject once you look into it. I'll check out some of the links and books too.

Thanks again!

(Further replies also welcome!)
 
  • #9
alxm
Science Advisor
1,842
9
People have already answered your questions and written them down in books. Please understand it's somewhat rude to ask if you've made no apparent attempt to find out the answer on your own, apart from asking questions. You're asking other people to make an effort when you apparently haven't done so yourself.

It's also posted in the wrong part of the forum. This isn't a quantum physics question, it's a grade-school chemistry question. So you'd do best to read grade-school chemistry/science textbooks. If you want to learn the details of the quantum mechanics of chemistry, then you'll have to work your way up to university-level chemistry first.
 
  • #10
People have already answered your questions and written them down in books. Please understand it's somewhat rude to ask if you've made no apparent attempt to find out the answer on your own, apart from asking questions. You're asking other people to make an effort when you apparently haven't done so yourself.

It's also posted in the wrong part of the forum. This isn't a quantum physics question, it's a grade-school chemistry question. So you'd do best to read grade-school chemistry/science textbooks. If you want to learn the details of the quantum mechanics of chemistry, then you'll have to work your way up to university-level chemistry first.
Thanks, that's really helpful.

The people who answered didn't seem to have any problem with answering me.
 
  • #11
alxm
Science Advisor
1,842
9
Thanks, that's really helpful.
It is. Asking questions alone is not a good way to learn, at all.

The people who answered didn't seem to have any problem with answering me.
So since some people are kind enough to spend their time on answering questions you have no problems finding out yourself, it's not rude to ask?

How old are you? 13? You're acting like it. (And anyone that age or above it would/should have come into contact with at least some chemistry in school, in most countries)
 
  • #12
I find it amazing that you spent time typing out your original question!

Why not let those who want to answer answer, and those who don't not.

Ask a question on a forum and you tell me to read a book. Kind of goes against what a forum is about.

Your response has been completely unwarranted and unjustified and you have the nerve to call me rude.
 

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