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B Why degree rankine?

  1. Jun 27, 2016 #1

    Maylis

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    I know kelvin has no degrees because it is an absolute scale, but I've never seen rankine not be associated with a degree, yet it is also an absolute scale. Anyone know why this is?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 27, 2016 #2

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    I think it should as well be °K because the degree basically refers to the step size which matters a lot. However, it simply doesn't make a difference. Most likely it's for historical reasons (which I don't know).
     
  4. Jun 27, 2016 #3

    Tom.G

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  5. Jun 27, 2016 #4

    davenn

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    it is just Kelvin, no degrees

    that I also didn't know ... thought it has always just been just Kelvin


    live and learn :smile:
     
  6. Jun 27, 2016 #5

    davenn

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    hadn't even heard Rankine temp scale..... must have been in very limited use



    D
     
  7. Jun 28, 2016 #6

    fresh_42

    Staff: Mentor

    Yes, but I still think (meant as an opinion, not as an assumption) °K would be more accurate.

    Yes! And I've read about many other scales I've never heard of before, too. I always thought Kelvin, Celsius, Fahrenheit and Réaumur were all.

    And I learned that Celsius was an upside down scale in its beginning, i.e. freezing at 100°C, evaporation at 0°C! It has been changed by Linné shortly after Celsius' death. And the Russian also used a turned scale in the 19th century: °D (Delisle).

    And I learned that the triple point of water defines Kelvin. I've always wondered where the discrepancy between 273,15°C and 273,16°C comes from. I mistakenly thought it had something to do with the change of definition since my school days.
     
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