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Why do I like blue?

  1. May 7, 2003 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    Why do we have favorite colors? Does anyone know?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 7, 2003 #2

    drag

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    Greetings Ivan !
    I think the Chineese tried to explain these
    preferences as reflections of human character.
    Don't know if it makes sense or just another
    belief. I'll look for a link.
    (btw, my favorite color is yellow.)

    Live long and prosper.
     
  4. May 7, 2003 #3

    Greg Bernhardt

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    I like green and blue, nature and technology
     
  5. May 8, 2003 #4
    My guess is that some colors make us (subconsciously) feel good. For example, the colors orange and yellow make us subconsciously feel uplifted, happy. Green makes us think of $money$. That's all I know about this.

    BTW, my favorite colors are red, $$green$$, black, white, yellow, purple.
     
  6. May 8, 2003 #5
    Blue is a good colour. It is primary, and does not stand out as much as red, and yellow is too much like skin colour (for clothes that is).

    The sky is blue,in daytime, and is it therefore the colour that we mostly see?
     
  7. May 8, 2003 #6

    drag

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    I'd say plus most definitly loves blue...
     
  8. May 8, 2003 #7

    Ivan Seeking

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    Something from my database that caught my attention as potentially related to this question:

    What is synesthesia?
     
  9. May 8, 2003 #8
    don't feel blue about blue

    We may have some natural programming (psychologically) by enjoying blue sky days as opposed to tornado stuff and btw I don't remember ever being bit by something blue, maybe a black dog, white and beige dog, dark bugs, but not blue things.

    gilnv of www.surrealcity.com
     
  10. May 8, 2003 #9
    Yeahh, synesthesia is very interesting.
     
  11. May 9, 2003 #10

    Ivan Seeking

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    I thought so. One can imagine some potential links to preferences in music, color and art, and even things like poetry...of course I only mean to be supposing here. Also, what about the old fingernails-on-the-chalkboard reaction? A common form of synesthesia?
     
  12. May 10, 2003 #11

    Ivan Seeking

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  13. May 10, 2003 #12

    Kerrie

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    blue is my favorite color too...
     
  14. May 10, 2003 #13

    FZ+

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    Me too...
     
  15. May 13, 2003 #14
    You know, synesthesia really simplifies it all for us. The brain isn't as complex as we originally thought it to be. I guess it's safe to say that, quite simply, feelings are results of a series of chemical/horomonal reactions. I remember when I first thought about the complexity of the brain. I was in great awe of it. But now, as I am learning more about it, the awe I once felt is slowly deminishing. I think it all seems relatively simpler. I sense a feeling of guilt because I think the brain is simpler than what most people think. Anyone else?

    I don't know if the fingernails-on-the-chalkboard reaction would be a form of synesthesia because, from my point of view at least, people cringe due to the excurciatingly high pitched noise it makes.
     
  16. May 14, 2003 #15

    Ivan Seeking

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    I think this depends on how we define the boundaries of science.

    a boundary of science

    Just in case you missed this one. Also, there is still a lot of strangeness out there. What is my latest count...12 conflicting theories about what constitutes a measurement? These kinds of questions still haunt and limit any formal understanding of things like brains or branes. Don't you think?
     
  17. May 14, 2003 #16
    Take a look at this chumps.

    [​IMG]

    Notice anything?

    How 'bout the fact that you can distinguish more shades color between blue and green than any other color.

    Why can do we this?

    Well, some people believe this phenomena is due to the fact that we evolved from out of the ocean where everything is a shade of color between blue and green. Other people believe it's just because most things in nature, like plants and the sky, fall within this color range. So, from an evolutionary standpoint, it is most advantageous to be able to distinguish this range the best.

    So why is it your favorite color?

    From a mere statistical point of view, the chances of your favorite color being one of the many shades of blue or green (that you can see) are greater than the chances of your favorite color being one of the fewer shades of yellow or red (that you can see). From a psychological point of view, we tend to associate blue with tranquility. For this reason, city busses and subways often have blue lights, so as to reduce violent behavior. Also, prison cells are often painted blue or green. By the same token, we often associate red with pain, irritation and anger. We all know what color you shouldn't wave in front of a raging bull.

    eNtRopY
     
  18. May 14, 2003 #17

    Ivan Seeking

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    I have always found interesting the subtle differences between people - in their taste in music, art, color, etc etc. But your point of statistics is a good one. But even more to the point, why would someone prefer red or yellow?
     
  19. May 17, 2003 #18
    Full or partial colorblindness maybe?
     
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