Why Does a Black Strip Appear on My TV Monitor When Using a Stroboscope?

  • Thread starter Alexandeer
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In summary: If these solutions do not work, it may be necessary to use a different type of illuminator or camera/monitor setup.
  • #1
Alexandeer
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For the purpose of my project I need to monitor vibrations in mechanical parts using the following set up:
- CCTV camera
- TV monitors
- Illuminator which I use is a stroboscope. 50 very short (~0,2 ms) flashes per second (same frequency as this of the camera and TV monitor - 50 Hz)
However the problem is that a black strip appears horizontal on the TV monitor (1 cm wide).
It is very unpleasant especially when it coincident with the observed object.
Could you suggest me what can be the reason and how could I eliminate it?

P.S. If I increase the frequency of the stroboscope two times (100 Hz) than the strips are already 2 if I set it to work at 200 Hz the black strips are already 4. If I illuminate for example with 55Hz the strip is going across the monitor as if the difference (with 50 Hz) is smaller than it run slowly if the difference is bigger then it start to run faster.
Thank you in advance
Alexander
 
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  • #2
The most likely cause of the black strips appearing on the TV monitor is interference from the stroboscope. When the frequency of the stroboscope is close to that of the CCTV camera and the TV monitor, it can cause interference, which can manifest as the black strips. To try to eliminate this, you could increase the frequency of the stroboscope or try to reduce the intensity of the light emitted by the illuminator. You could also try shielding the illuminator from the camera/TV monitor to reduce any interference.
 
  • #3


Thank you for sharing your project and the issue you are facing. It seems like the black strip on the TV monitor is caused by interference between the stroboscope's frequency and the camera/TV monitor's frequency. This is a common issue when using stroboscopes and CCTV cameras.

One solution to eliminate the black strip is to adjust the frequency of the stroboscope to be slightly different from the camera and TV monitor's frequency. For example, if the camera and TV monitor are set to 50 Hz, you can try setting the stroboscope to 49 or 51 Hz. This should help reduce the interference and eliminate the black strip.

Another solution is to use a different type of illuminator, such as a LED light source, which may not cause interference with the camera and TV monitor's frequency.

I hope this helps and good luck with your project!
 

Related to Why Does a Black Strip Appear on My TV Monitor When Using a Stroboscope?

1) What is stroboscope monitoring by CCTV?

Stroboscope monitoring by CCTV is a method of using a stroboscope, or a high-intensity flashing light, in conjunction with a CCTV camera to capture and analyze motion in a specific area.

2) How does stroboscope monitoring work?

The stroboscope emits short pulses of light at a high frequency, which creates the illusion of slowing down or freezing motion. The CCTV camera captures these flashes and records them, allowing for detailed analysis of the motion.

3) What are the benefits of using stroboscope monitoring by CCTV?

Stroboscope monitoring by CCTV allows for precise and detailed analysis of motion, making it useful in industries such as manufacturing, sports, and research. It can also provide evidence in investigations and can be used for security purposes.

4) Are there any limitations to stroboscope monitoring by CCTV?

One limitation is that the stroboscope may not work well in brightly lit areas, as the flashes of light can be overpowered. It also requires a stationary object or background to be effective, so it may not be suitable for monitoring moving subjects.

5) How is stroboscope monitoring by CCTV different from traditional CCTV surveillance?

Traditional CCTV surveillance records continuous footage, while stroboscope monitoring captures motion in short, intermittent bursts. This allows for more detailed analysis of specific movements, rather than just overall activity in an area.

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