Why does Cheney fear Russert?

  • #1
Ivan Seeking
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Will Cheney dare to respond to Russerts invitation to "Meet The Press"? I suspect not. There is an open invitation to show up on any Sunday until the election. This is the show that Kennedy once called "the fifty-first state".

Edwards isn't afraid to show up; why is Cheney?.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3032608/
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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After the thrashing Russert gave Edwards, it's no surprise Cheney wouldn't want to come on the show.

And plus, how many Sundays do you think Cheney has off between now and the election? His regular job of running the country is hard enough, but now he's got to go out on the campaign trail too, talk about a headache, who knows what Georgie might choke on while Cheney's not spoon-feeding him baby food.
 
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  • #3
Hmm, I've heard of Tim Russert but haven't really had the inclination to watch his show. He sounds interesting. I'll check him out one of these days.
 
  • #4
Ivan Seeking
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Like I said, Cheney is afraid of Russert. Edwards isn't.

This is not just some talk show; it is a grand tradition in politics. Cheney knows that if he shows his face he's doomed. You're right; Russert would rip him apart, one piece at a time. ...but Edwards showed up...hmmm.
 
  • #5
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The_Professional said:
Hmm, I've heard of Tim Russert but haven't really had the inclination to watch his show. He sounds interesting. I'll check him out one of these days.
Russert is the man. Your average interviewer would say something like "You previously said x, now you say y, and some would say that might constitute a change of position based on political opportunism, your response to those criticisms?" and when the dick just gives some crappy answer, they let them go. Not Russert, he keeps on pressing and pressing the issues until the slimey bastards are forced to give an answer or look like such stupid weasles for trying to evade the question that you get a fair view of them.

He's my favorite :biggrin:
 
  • #6
Ivan Seeking
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About Meet the Press

The history of "Meet the Press" is an illustrious one. Currently in our 57th year, "Meet the Press" is the longest-running program on network television. "Meet the Press" premiered on NBC-TV on November 6, 1947, and made its debut two years earlier as a radio program with Martha Rountree and Lawrence Spivak as producers. For almost as long as there has been television - there has been "Meet the Press".

There have only been 9 moderators in the history of "Meet the Press." Tim Russert, the current custodian, is in his twelfth year as moderator - the longest serving moderator in the history of the show. Russert also serves as managing editor. He defines the mission of "Meet the Press" as a thoughtful exchange of ideas, sometimes tense, even feisty, occasionally humorous, but always fair and always civilized.

President Kennedy once referred to "Meet the Press" as the "fifty-first state," and since the Kennedy presidency, every man who has occupied the Oval Office has appeared on "Meet the Press" during his career. Most recently, Tim Russert conducted an exclusive, special, hour-long interview with President George W. Bush on "Meet the Press" from the Oval Office at the White House, for his first Sunday morning interview as president on February 8, 2004.

Foreign policy has always been a staple of "Meet the Press" interviews. World leaders like Fidel Castro, Francois Mitterrand, Indira Gandhi, David Ben-Gurion, Golda Meir, Ferdinand Marcos, Mikhail Gorbachev, Anwar el-Sadat, Yitzhak Rabin, King Hussein of Jordan, Hamid Karzai, Pervez Musharraf, King Abdullah of Jordan and Tony Blair have all been interviewed on "Meet the Press."

From the very beginning, "Meet the Press" has been an equal opportunity, inclusive and groundbreaking news program. A proud part of that history was the involvement of women journalists. In fact, the co-creator of "Meet the Press" and the show's first moderator was noted journalist Martha Rountree. The first female guest interviewed on "Meet the Press" was Elizabeth Bentley, a former Soviet spy, on September 12, 1948.

Since those beginning days, "Meet the Press" has interviewed First Ladies Eleanor Roosevelt, Nancy Reagan, Rosalynn Carter, Hillary Rodham Clinton and Laura Bush has appeared on "Meet the Press" every year since her husband has been president. Other notable women appearing as guests over the years on "Meet the Press" include: Barbara Jordan, Shirley Chisholm, Jane Fonda, Phyllis Schlafly, Geraldine Ferraro, Gloria Steiner, Elizabeth Dole, Madeleine Albright, Tipper Gore, Condoleezza Rice, Nancy Pelosi, Shirley Temple Black and Caroline Kennedy.

Every Sunday morning for 57 years strong, in times of peace or war, "Meet the Press" is welcomed into the homes of Americans to analyze, discuss and review the news of the week -- and to look ahead to the week to come -- with world-renowned guests.

We are proud to be the highest rated, most watched and most quoted Sunday morning public affairs program. An average audience of 5 million viewers join us each week to share in a national dialogue about the important issues of our time.

If it's Sunday, it's "Meet the Press."
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3403008/

It is at least one of the best - probably the best in my opinion - places to see politicians face real questions, and then see them held accountable for providing real answers.
To fear Tim Russert is to fear telling the truth.
 

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