Why E=MC2?

  • Thread starter Unredeemed
  • Start date
  • #1
Unredeemed
120
0
I really do not understand WHY the equation is as it is. I understand what the equation means and how important it is. But for what reason is it so?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
1effect
321
0
I really do not understand WHY the equation is as it is. I understand what the equation means and how important it is. But for what reason is it so?

The derivation is explained here
 
  • #3
Unredeemed
120
0
The derivation is explained here[/url]

Thank you, however I am still in high school and therefore my knowledge of physics is obviously still small. Is there any simpler way of explaining it?
 
  • #4
pmb_phy
2,952
1
Thank you, however I am still in high school and therefore my knowledge of physics is obviously still small. Is there any simpler way of explaining it?
Think of it like this: A body emits radiation in frame S in the positive and negative x-direction of equal quantities (but opposite directions). The total momentum of radiation emitted in S is zero. Now look at the same situation as viewed in a frame moving with respect. The total momentum of radiation emitted by the body is now non-zero. The body must account for that change in momentum. Calculation shows that the only way for this to happen is for the mass of the body to decrease. Calculation shows that the amount of energy emitted by the body E is related to the magnitude of the amount of decrease in the mass, m, as E = mc2.

Pete
 
  • #5
Unredeemed
120
0
Think of it like this: A body emits radiation in frame S in the positive and negative x-direction of equal quantities (but opposite directions). The total momentum of radiation emitted in S is zero. Now look at the same situation as viewed in a frame moving with respect. The total momentum of radiation emitted by the body is now non-zero. The body must account for that change in momentum. Calculation shows that the only way for this to happen is for the mass of the body to decrease. Calculation shows that the amount of energy emitted by the body E is related to the magnitude of the amount of decrease in the mass, m, as E = mc2.

Pete

Thanks, that helps a lot. But I'm still struggling slightly. Does anyone have any good analogies which might help me understand?
 
  • #6
peter0302
876
3
E=mc^2 comes from the relativistic kinetic energy formula

KE = ymc^2 - mc^2

y is gamma, the Lorentz factor.
From that you get

KE + mc^2 = ymc^2 = Mc^2

From that point one can infer that there's a TOTAL energy (ymc^2), made up of kinetic energy plus mc^2. So E=Mc^2 usually means total energy, omitting the gamma and considering relativistic rather than invariant mass.

Now, as for the derivation of the kinetic energy formula, the derivation is identical to Newton's except that relativistic momentum (ymv) rather than ordinary momentum (mv) is used.

As for analogies, just think of matter and energy being equivalent, and c^2 simply being a conversion factor between the kilogram and the joule.
 
Last edited:

Suggested for: Why E=MC2?

  • Last Post
Replies
12
Views
445
  • Last Post
Replies
14
Views
863
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
850
Replies
8
Views
864
  • Last Post
2
Replies
40
Views
1K
Replies
63
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
22
Views
597
Replies
17
Views
1K
Replies
44
Views
951
Replies
1
Views
271
Top