Why I hate the english language.

  • #26
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Hi there,

Not being only from the English language, but also French. And now managing my way with German, I can only say that you will find that in pretty much every language. Languages evolute over the years, therefore having some exception that may seem terribly weird but must have an explanation for it.

Don't get me wrong, I am just saying that if you want to speak a language other people speak, you will run into some of these exceptions.

I found the best way to deal with them is to try to make a joke out of it.

Cheers
 
  • #27
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how the hell do you pronounce wOman? wiman?
He wrote women, not woman.

ummmmmmmm....society is spelled with an i before e just thought you'd like to know that..........

This thread wouldn't exist if he didn't know that.
 
  • #28
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He wrote women, not woman.

How's that make a difference in how the word is pronounced? women = wimen?
 
  • #29
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Pizza is pronounced Peetza. I tried explaining that it's pronounced with a T in it to my friend, but for the life of him, he couldn't understand it. Even when he said it, he said it with the T sound. His tongue touched the roof of his mouth when he said it, but he still couldn't hear it. That was so weird.
 
  • #30
Kurdt
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How about homophones?

wrought - rot

Wrought and rot homophones? Is that like my name having two syllables? :tongue:
 
  • #31
lisab
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How's that make a difference in how the word is pronounced? women = wimen?

Yes.

Edit: Actually it's more like "wimin"
 
  • #32
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Yes.

Edit: Actually it's more like "wimin"

lol who says WOMen like WIMIN that's weird.
 
  • #33
lisab
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lol who says WOMen like WIMIN that's weird.

I think you're thinking "woman". Woman = WOM-an, Women = WIM-in
 
  • #34
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He wrote women, not woman.

How's that make a difference in how the word is pronounced? women = wimen?

So, Sorry! do you pronounce "woman" and "women" the same way?

Edit: The lovely and talented LisaB beat me to it. :smile:

Sorry! One's plural and one's singular, yes?
 
  • #35
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yeah one is WO-Man and the other is WO-men do you pronounce men as min?

'There are some great looking min over there.'

haha what?
 
  • #36
lisab
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yeah one is WO-Man and the other is WO-men do you pronounce men as min?

'There are some great looking min over there.'

haha what?

Yes :rofl:! In the word "women" the "men" is pronounced "min," but the word "men" is pronounced "men."

It's not logical; it's English. Which, I presume, is why the OP hates it.
 
  • #37
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Yes :rofl:! In the word "women" the "men" is pronounced "min," but the word "men" is pronounced "men."

It's not logical; it's English. Which, I presume, is why the OP hates it.

Hahaha. That's SO weird, to me it's still 'men' in wo-men.

I wonder do you guys also pronounce 'cavalry and calvary' the same way?

What about mischievous this one to me sounds like 'mis-chiev-ous' I hear people say 'mis-cheev-eee-ous' ha.

It's interesting to see how other people pronounce words though :P

EDIT: I've been sitting here saying the word women and it sounds to me like I'm saying 'w-uh-mmm-en' (as in end) and when I say woman it's more like 'w-uh-mmm-an' (as in and). :tongue: I looked it up in the dictionary and it says \ˈwi-mən\
 
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  • #38
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Yes ! In the word "women" the "men" is pronounced "min," but the word "men" is pronounced "men."
"Men" and "min" would be pronounced the same way. Unless you pronounce "men" with the "e" sounding like the "e" in "egg".
What about mischievous this one to me sounds like 'mis-chiev-ous' I hear people say 'mis-cheev-eee-ous' ha.

It's interesting to see how other people pronounce words though :P
The English pronounce words funny. Like Aluminum. They say al-oo-min-ee-um. It's not even spelled that way. There would have to be an "I" before the last "U" for that to be a legitimate pronunciation. But I guess they put the I there to compensate.
I've been sitting here saying the word women and it sounds to me like I'm saying 'w-uh-mmm-en' (as in end) and when I say woman it's more like 'w-uh-mmm-an' (as in and).
Women is pronounced like "whimin."
Woman is pronounced like "wuhmun." That "wuh" part isn't exactly right, but it's the closest sound I can find to it. And the last "mun" part isn't exactly right either, but it doesn't quite have the "min" sound, so I gave it the "mun" sound. When you say it, it's more like you're trying to put that M right next to the N as close as possible.
 
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  • #39
Kurdt
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The English pronounce words funny. Like Aluminum. They say al-oo-min-ee-um. It's not even spelled that way. There would have to be an "I" before the last "U" for that to be a legitimate pronunciation.

There is in a real english dictionary. :wink:
 
  • #40
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There is in a real english dictionary. :wink:

I edited my post. I didn't think that they would most likely have a different spelling too.
 
  • #41
arildno
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trough, tough, through, borough.. (o-)ugh!!
 
  • #42
He wrote women, not woman.



This thread wouldn't exist if he didn't know that.
i think you mean this thread wouldnt exist if he DID know rhat,. if he DIDNt know that the thread would and DID exist, as seen in the op, where he incorrectly states that ''soceity'' does not meet the i before e rule!
 
  • #43
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i think you mean this thread wouldnt exist if he DID know rhat,. if he DIDNt know that the thread would and DID exist, as seen in the op, where he incorrectly states that ''soceity'' does not meet the i before e rule!

Ok people keep saying this in this thread. How does society follow 'i before except after c'?

I am quite sure its so-c-i-e-ty. So according to the rule it should be spelt so-c-e-i-ty. Because i should not come before e since it is after c.
 
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  • #44
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I actually view it as the opposite. As long as spelling is reasonably close, I can usually read quickly over some typos or misspellings. When grammar and punctuation are discarded, it takes a lot more time to read and process what something says, and leaves a lot of room for misinterpretation. I also don't think the shift key is all that hard to reach for on a keyboard.

Spelling errors are alot more visible than "I-before-E" violations. Because of this, we take the author of the spelling error much less seriously than the author of the more nuanced errors.

Another english folly: "we take the author of the spelling error much less seriously..." Do we take the author of the spelling error much seriously? Or less seriously?
 
  • #45
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Ok people keep saying this in this thread. How does society follow 'i before except after c'?

I am quite sure its so-c-i-e-ty. So according to the rule it should be spelt so-c-e-i-ty. Because I should not come before e since it is after


Another english folly: In Britian, it's "genious," but here it's "genius."
 
  • #47
mgb_phys
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I edited my post. I didn't think that they would most likely have a different spelling too.

The official IUPAC spelling is now Aluminium, unfortunately they also insist on spelling Sulpher as Sulfur.
 
  • #48
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i think you mean this thread wouldnt exist if he DID know rhat,. if he DIDNt know that the thread would and DID exist, as seen in the op, where he incorrectly states that ''soceity'' does not meet the i before e rule!

He meant to spell the words incorrectly to show what they should be if they followed the "rules". Although he spelled foreigner correctly, which makes it a little confusing.

At least that's how I interpret it. Maybe he did mean to spell them both right. I don't know.
 
  • #49
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The official IUPAC spelling is now Aluminium, unfortunately they also insist on spelling Sulpher as Sulfur.

Here's something from wikipedia:
"The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) adopted aluminium as the standard international name for the element in 1990, but three years later recognized aluminum as an acceptable variant. Hence their periodic table includes both.[53] IUPAC officially prefers the use of aluminium in its internal publications, although several IUPAC publications use the spelling aluminum"

So they prefer the British spelling, but accept and sometimes use the American spelling.
I say whichever one came first should be the official spelling.
 
  • #50
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He meant to spell the words incorrectly to show what they should be if they followed the "rules". Although he spelled foreigner correctly, which makes it a little confusing.

At least that's how I interpret it. Maybe he did mean to spell them both right. I don't know.

That's what I took it as too, that he purposely spelt society incorrectly to show the use of the rediculous 'rule'. Society does not follow the rule sports, you are wrong, not the OP.

Either that or he just made a typo with spelling society... regardless it doesn't change the fact that the word does not follow i before e rule.
 

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