Why I hate the english language.

  • #51
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Does anyone understand what this guy is saying? (he speaks English, haha)


Tink am in da picktzo..? Haha...
 
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  • #52
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Interesting trivia note: The word "weird" derives from the germanic "wyrd", an interesting word that roughly translates to "fate" although is significantly more nuanced. Apparently, Shakespeare anglicized the word in Macbeth to describe the three witches (the weird sisters, although there was originally a funny looking accent mark in the word) and the word was then adopted into general english.
 
  • #53
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Hahaha. That's SO weird, to me it's still 'men' in wo-men.

I wonder do you guys also pronounce 'cavalry and calvary' the same way?

What about mischievous this one to me sounds like 'mis-chiev-ous' I hear people say 'mis-cheev-eee-ous' ha.

It's interesting to see how other people pronounce words though :P

EDIT: I've been sitting here saying the word women and it sounds to me like I'm saying 'w-uh-mmm-en' (as in end) and when I say woman it's more like 'w-uh-mmm-an' (as in and). :tongue: I looked it up in the dictionary and it says \ˈwi-mən\


Look, this guy is Canadian, too, he can teach you. :biggrin:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/B4MIrKXaD84&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param [Broken] name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/B4MIrKXaD84&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>​
 
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  • #54
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Look, this guy is Canadian, too, he can teach you. :biggrin:

Hahaha, he sounds like at the end of women he is saying WEHM-EN not WIMIN... they sound different.. like in vs end...

look at the word VERMIN the end of this word sounds nothing like the end of women. Right?
 
  • #55
mgb_phys
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Someone (James Nicoll) said - English doesn't just borrow words from other languages, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary.

If you are 'borrowing' from a language that's easy to pronounce with obvious spelling like Dutch you can keep the pronunciation the same but make up a new spelling
But if the word comes from a language that's hard to pronounce - like French then keep the spelling but pronounce it in English. if you feel bad you can use the original plural instead of an English one.
If you take a word from a language with lots of cool complicated grammar (like latin) then rather than waste it - it's worth using the foreign grammar for the rest of the sentence as well, even if you don't need to.
 
  • #56
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But if the word comes from a language that's hard to pronounce - like French then keep the spelling but pronounce it in English.

http://www.answers.com/topic/le-cordon-bleu"
floet1.gif
 
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  • #57
Moonbear
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Yes :rofl:! In the word "women" the "men" is pronounced "min," but the word "men" is pronounced "men."

It's not logical; it's English. Which, I presume, is why the OP hates it.

I pronounce it wi-men.

"Wimmin" makes me think of redneck English (sorry lisa) and a joke my grandparents had on their bar. It was a plaque thing shaped like a tombstone and read:
Ma loved pa.
Pa loved wimmin.
Ma caught pa with two in swimmin.
Here lies pa.
 
  • #58
lisab
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I pronounce it wi-men.

"Wimmin" makes me think of redneck English (sorry lisa) and a joke my grandparents had on their bar. It was a plaque thing shaped like a tombstone and read:
Ma loved pa.
Pa loved wimmin.
Ma caught pa with two in swimmin.
Here lies pa.

Sounds right to me...women does rhyme with swimmin'!

Actually dictionary.com http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Women" [Broken]. And yes, it does sound a bit redneck :smile:.
 
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  • #59
Pythagorean
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"read" and "read" always bugged me.
(present tense / past tense)
 
  • #60
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Look, this guy is Canadian, too, he can teach you. :biggrin:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/B4MIrKXaD84&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param [Broken] name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/B4MIrKXaD84&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>​

What on earth is that about?!

Anyhow, yes, the guy bringing us the letter W and the number 4 today does, in fact, know that "woman" and "women" are pronounced entirely differently.

Sorry! you're Cannunkian, yes? If so, which part do you come from?
 
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  • #61
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What on earth is that about?!

Anyhow, yes, the guy bringing us the letter W and the number 4 today does, in fact, know that "woman" and "women" are pronounced entirely differently.

Sorry! you're Cannunkian, yes? If so, which part do you come from?

GTA, Southern Mississauga specifically if you know where that is.
 
  • #62
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From time to time I post this "Plan for the Improvement of English Spelling". It is attributed to Mark Twain although it is unlikely that he actually wrote it.
Mark Twain said:
For example, in Year 1 that useless letter "c" would be dropped to be replased either by "k" or "s," and likewise "x" would no longer be part of the alphabet. The only kase in which "c" would be retained would be the "ch" formation, which will be dealt with later. Year 2 might reform "w" spelling, so that "which" and "one" would take the same konsonant, wile Year 3 might well abolish "y" replasing it with "i" and Iear 4 might fiks the "g / j" anomali wonse and for all.

Jenerally, then, the improvement would kontinue iear bai iear with Iear 5 doing awai with useless double konsonants, and Iears 6-12 or so modifaiing vowlz and the rimeining voist and unvoist konsonants. Bai Iear 15 or sou, it wud fainali bi posibl tu meik ius ov thi ridandant letez "c," "y," and "x" - bai now jast a memori in the maindz ov ould doderez - tu riplais "ch," "sh," and "th" rispektivli.

Fainali, xen, aafte sam 20 iers ov orxogrefkl riform, wi wud hev a lojikl, kohirnt speling in ius xrewawt xe Ingliy-spiking werld.
More on this can be found at http://www.spellingsociety.org/journals/j31/satires.php" [Broken]
 
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  • #63
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I pronounce it wi-men.

"Wimmin" makes me think of redneck English (sorry lisa)
What's the pronunciation difference between "wi-men" and "wimmin"? They look like they'd be pronounced the same way.
 
  • #64
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GTA, Southern Mississauga specifically if you know where that is.

Tranna, then. That explains it. :wink:

I'm originally from Ottawa and have been stranded in the barren wastelands of redneckery, Edmonton, for a number of years.
 
  • #65
mgb_phys
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Tranna, then. That explains it. :wink:.
Its' a world class city, you know !
 
  • #67
Moonbear
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What's the pronunciation difference between "wi-men" and "wimmin"? They look like they'd be pronounced the same way.

I don't even know how to explain it in writing, and can't fathom why you wouldn't see a difference in pronunciation. They are very distinctly different sounds. When you say "men" does it sound like "min?" Say the letter L (el) and then say the word ill. Do they sound alike? :confused:
 
  • #68
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I don't even know how to explain it in writing, and can't fathom why you wouldn't see a difference in pronunciation. They are very distinctly different sounds. When you say "men" does it sound like "min?" Say the letter L (el) and then say the word ill. Do they sound alike? :confused:

So you mean you pronounce "men" with the "e" sounding like the "e" in "egg"? Instead of the "e" sounding like the "i" in "in"? Which would sound like the "e" in "end".
Click on the speaker icon to hear how I pronounce "men".
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/men?o=100084&qsrc=2871&l=dir

I've never heard it pronounced any other way.
 
  • #69
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So you mean you pronounce "men" with the "e" sounding like the "e" in "egg"? Instead of the "e" sounding like the "i" in "in"? Which would sound like the "e" in "end".
Click on the speaker icon to hear how I pronounce "men".
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/men?o=100084&qsrc=2871&l=dir

I've never heard it pronounced any other way.

Uh leroy, the 'i' in in does not sound like the 'e' in end. The 'i' in in sounds like the 'i' in it.

If you said in as you would say end it would just sound like your saying the letter n....

Men and Min definitely sound different.
 
  • #70
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Uh leroy, the 'i' in in does not sound like the 'e' in end. The 'i' in in sounds like the 'i' in it.

If you said in as you would say end it would just sound like your saying the letter n....

There's a slight difference. I notice when I say it and when I hear it repeatedly from clicking on the speaker.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/end?o=100084

But the difference is small. The "e" in "end" doesn't have an "e" sound. You can hear the "e" sound in the word "egg".
 
  • #71
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There's a slight difference. I notice when I say it and when I hear it repeatedly from clicking on the speaker.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/end?o=100084

But the difference is small. The "e" in "end" doesn't have an "e" sound. You can hear the "e" sound in the word "egg".

They are both 'e' sounds one is long one is short...

These are things you learn in grade 2 and are supposed to remember for the rest of your life :tongue: Well here they teach you that stuff, maybe it's because we also HAVE to take french classes?

EDIT: Actually they both have the same 'e' sound... how do you say end? like Indian?
 
  • #72
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They are both 'e' sounds one is long one is short...

These are things you learn in grade 2 and are supposed to remember for the rest of your life Well here they teach you that stuff, maybe it's because we also HAVE to take french classes?
The long "e" is the sound it makes in the word "emu". The short "e" sound is the sound it makes in the word "egg" or "edge".
 
  • #73
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The long "e" is the sound it makes in the word "emu". The short "e" sound is the sound it makes in the word "egg" or "edge".

Yeah I corrected my post I wasn't thinking about the sounds the words you posted made... they are both short 'e' sounds... no difference. I editted my other post while you posted :p
 
  • #74
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EDIT: Actually they both have the same 'e' sound... how do you say end? like Indian?
Not quite, but it's so similar that they basically make the same sound.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/end?o=100084
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/indian?o=100084

When she says "end" it's not the "e" sound, but a sort of different "i" sound. It's definitely not the same sound as in the word "epic".
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/epic?o=100084


That's the way I've always heard them pronounced. If someone pronounced "egg" with the same sound they use in "end", it would almost sound like "igg".

I think what makes them sound different is the letter that follows the "e". Your mouth is preparing to make the "N" sound, so that changes the way the "e" is pronounced. In "egg", you don't have to adjust your mouth to prepare for the next letter, since the "g" sound can be made quickly with an open mouth. Since the "g" sound is done at the back of your mouth, so your tongue can easily lift itself up back there to make the sound. Which is why it's so easy to make the "g" sound with your mouth open wide and not so easy with the "n" sound.
 
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  • #75
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Not quite, but it's so similar that they basically make the same sound.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/end?o=100084
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/indian?o=100084

When she says "end" it's not the "e" sound, but a sort of different "i" sound. It's definitely not the same sound as in the word "epic".
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/epic?o=100084


That's the way I've always heard them pronounced. If someone pronounced "egg" with the same sound they use in "end", it would almost sound like "igg".

You my friend, have one weird accent. How do you pronounce the word friend then? Just fr'i'nd?

Because I thought I was going crazy I went and looked up the pronounciation on both. They are the same \'end\ \'eg\ Both 'e' sounds are the same in egg though it takes on a slightly more 'a' type of sound. Compared with \ˈē-(ˌ)myü\ or it \ət\
 
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