Why is it possible for a sigma hyperon to decay into either 2 or 3 gamma hyperons?

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Why is it possible for a sigma hyperon to decay into either 2 or 3 gamma hyperons?
 

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  • #2
PeroK
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Why is it possible for a sigma hyperon to decay into either 2 or 3 gamma hyperons?
Decay processes are beyond the scope of this article.
 
  • #3
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Decay processes are beyond the scope of this article.
ok
 
  • #4
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Why is it possible for a sigma hyperon to decay into either 2 or 3 gamma hyperons?
What is a gamma hyperon?
 
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  • #6
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Well, sorry, but I look it up before asking and I couldn't find anything, also I couldn't get much information in the link you give, but I think it refers to this paper? Is this what you mean? Because in this paper they talk about the ##\Omega^-## hyperon, is the gamma hyperon another name for the ##\Omega^-## hyperon?
 
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  • #7
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Well, sorry, but I look it up before asking and I couldn't find anything, also I couldn't get much information in the link you give, but I think it refers to this paper? Is this what you mean? Because in this paper they talk about the ##\Omega^-## hyperon, is the gamma hyperon another name for the ##\Omega^-## hyperon?
That Greek letter is called Omega -- have you read about hyperons? if you're curious, please read https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperon -- it doesn't say anything about gamma hyperons, but it does discuss lambdas and omegas, and the article is pretty good regarding hyperons generally.
 
  • #8
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That Greek letter is called Omega -- have you read about hyperons? if you're curious, please read https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperon -- it doesn't say anything about gamma hyperons, but it does discuss lambdas and omegas, and the article is pretty good regarding hyperons generally.
Yes, I know that ##\Omega## is the Greek letter Omega, and I know what the Hyperons are, and precisely because I never heard about the gamma hyperon is why I'm asking what it is. And as I said the link you give me, took me to the paper I mentioned in #11, which actually doesn't mention the gamma hyperon in the hole article. So could you please give me an exact reference on what are this gamma hyperons? Or an article referring to the decays you said?
 
  • #10
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Well, I don't have this book, can you please tell me what are its properties (quark content, isospin, mass, etc...)
Thanks!
 
  • #11
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In 1968 when I read that book the model wasn't as built as it is now. I don't know the details that you've asked for. Thanks for caring.
 
  • #12
Vanadium 50
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1. There is no such thing as a Gamma Hyperon.
2. Even if there were, a Sigma Hyperon could not decay into two or three of them because it would violate conservation of baryon number.
 
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  • #13
vanhees71
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  • #14
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There is no gamma hyperon mentioned in this PhD thesis. This is no surprise since there's no gamma hyperon known. The thesis discusses the weak decay ##\Omega^{-} \rightarrow \Lambda K^-##. The leading-order Feynman diagrams are drawn in the thesis in Fig. 1.2.
Wow -- I found the term 'gamma hyperon' in the title of that article, and I remember that term from a '65 book that I read a few years later than '65, and you say that "there's no gamma hyperon known" -- I respectfully disagree:

From:
V, Mpi-k & Adamovich, M & Barberis, D & Beck, Mathias & Beusch, W. & Boss, M & Brons, Stephan & Busch, Carina & Buscher, C. & Charignon, F. & Chauvin, J. & Dersch, U. & Dropmann, F. & Engelfried, J. & Faller, Frank & Fournier, A. (1997). Production by Sigma.

Inclusive cross sections for Xi Gamma hyperon production in high-energy Sigma Gamma , ß Gamma and neutron induced interactions were measured by the experiment WA89 at CERN. Secondary Sigma Gamma and ß Gamma beams with average momenta of 345 GeV=c and a neutron beam of 260 GeV=c were produced by primary protons of 450 GeV=c from the CERN SPS. The influence of the target mass on the Xi Gamma cross section is explored by comparing reactions on copper and carbon nuclei. Both single and double differential cross sections are presented as a function of the transverse momentum and the Feynman variable x F . A strong leading effect for Xi Gamma produced by Sigma Gamma is observed. (Submitted to Zeitschrift fur Physik C) #) supported by the Bundesministerium fur Bildung, Wissenschaft,Forschung und Technologie, Germany, under contract numbers 05 5HD15I, 06 HD524I and 06 MZ5265 a Now at FNAL, PO Box 500 Batavia, IL 60510, USA. b Now at Fraunhofer Inst. fur Solar...
[emphasis added]
 
  • #15
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I think you mean this article in where the gamma hyperon is not mentioned anywhere, I think your gammas appear in converting some symbols to plain text in some way.
 
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  • #17
Vanadium 50
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It's clear that the title is botched. It simply says "Production by Sigma".

There is no Gamma Hyperon.
 
  • #19
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It's clear that the title is botched. It simply says "Production by Sigma".

There is no Gamma Hyperon.
I'll rethink.
 
  • #20
berkeman
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This thread was broken out of a different thread, and @sysprog has requested that this thread be closed now. Thanks everybody. :smile:
 
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