Why Is Our Blood Red and How Does Induction Heating Work?

In summary: Europe. According to this quote, it was already available in 1999. The remaining drawback to induction cooking is not inherent in the process but is a consequence of the present state of the market, at least in the United States.
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  • #2
Way cool! :biggrin:
I used an induction heater in the factory that I worked in 30 years ago, to soften steel rods for die punching. I'd just poke the rod into the coil, step on the switch, and it was glowing deep red within 10 seconds. :approve:
 
  • #3
Isn't induction cooking an old thing already? :rolleyes:
 
  • #4
Monique said:
Isn't induction cooking an old thing already? :rolleyes:

Yeah, I think so.
 
  • #5
Monique said:
Isn't induction cooking an old thing already? :rolleyes:
Induction heating is, but this is for sure the first time that I've ever seen a stove based upon it.
 
  • #6
Oh, just had a fascinating idea. Have too look into a patent and a working model quick then i will tell.
 
  • #7
mapper said:
Oh, just had a fascinating idea. Have too look into a patent and a working model quick then i will tell.
It truly frightens me to say it, but I think that I know where you're going with this...
 
  • #8
Induction cooktops have been around for years, especially in Europe.
 
  • #9
DocToxyn said:
Induction cooktops have been around for years, especially in Europe.
Okay, I see what the problem is. I just checked, and they're only available through restaurant supply houses in this area.
 
  • #10
They are supposedly becoming more popular in the US (and Canada I guess) in recent years - that's probably the reason for the article.
 
  • #11
According to this quote, it was already available in 1999
The remaining drawback to induction cooking is not inherent in the process but is a consequence of the present state of the market, at least in the United States. That drawback is simple unavailability: there are virtually no--repeat, no--residential induction cookers available any more here ("any more" because Sears, GE, JennAir, and possibly others had them but no longer do, GE only dropping out in 1999 and JennAir, which only made a "half-and-half" unit anyway, even more recently).
 
  • #12
DocToxyn said:
Induction cooktops have been around for years, especially in Europe.


i have seen them about 20 years ago in europe, but this is big news here in america like fluorescent bulbs.
 
  • #13
omg wtf we got fluorescent bulbs now! Someone needs to clue me in!

Anyway my idea... you want to here it? Its good...
 
  • #14
The Sunday newspapers often advertise induction cookers in their food supplements. About £50 last time I saw them.

Someone tell me those comments about the US only just getting fluorescent bulbs was a joke...
 
  • #15
i'm not kidding, few years ago fluorescent bulbs were unknown here, they are introducing them slowly here, like everything else.electricity is just too cheap here to, there are more important thinghs to think about: like what is on TV tonight.
 
  • #16
stoned said:
i'm not kidding, few years ago fluorescent bulbs were unknown here, they are introducing them slowly here, like everything else.electricity is just too cheap here to, there are more important thinghs to think about: like what is on TV tonight.
GE introduced the Biax fluorescent bulb in 1987. I've been using fluorescent bulbs for years.
 
  • #17
Evo said:
GE introduced the Biax fluorescent bulb in 1987. I've been using fluorescent bulbs for years.
I got all excited when I first heard about fluorescent bulbs, and bought a bunch. The frost must have got 'em, though, because not one of the damned things ever sprouted.

Seriously... how backward are you people really? We've had them here for as long as I can remember, back to the 50's. :confused:
 
  • #18
Danger said:
Seriously... how backward are you people really? We've had them here for as long as I can remember, back to the 50's. :confused:

I'm talking about fluorescent bulbs who look like incadescent bulbs, not long fluorescent tubes usually seen in office buildings
 
  • #19
Danger said:
I got all excited when I first heard about fluorescent bulbs, and bought a bunch. The frost must have got 'em, though, because not one of the damned things ever sprouted.

Seriously... how backward are you people really? We've had them here for as long as I can remember, back to the 50's. :confused:
Not fluorescent lamps, fluorescent compact bulbs, these things
http://www.consumerenergycenter.org/homeandwork/homes/inside/lighting/images/compacts.jpg
 
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  • #20
stoned said:
I'm talking about fluorescent bulbs who look like incadescent bulbs, not long fluorescent tubes usually seen in office buildings
Oh... :redface: Okay, then. I've only seen them for the past dozen years or so.
 
  • #21
Danger said:
Oh... :redface: Okay, then. I've only seen them for the past dozen years or so.
admit it, you have only seen them when traveling abroad :wink:
 
  • #22
lets see.. i grew up in russia.. we had electric stoves - the electric plates would heat up, so i guess its heat by conduction. we had gas stoves, so that's heat by convection.

however this is the first time in my life i see an induction stove.. i mean it looks like an electric stove maybe that's why i ignored it before.. but the technology is definitely unique and well thought out.

Edit: got to point something out.. I'm not sure what everyone thought about this, but is that woman crazy for putting her hand on top of an induction stove? :eek:
 
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  • #23
cronxeh said:
Edit: got to point something out.. I'm not sure what everyone thought about this, but is that woman crazy for putting her hand on top of an induction stove? :eek:

Shouldn't be a problem unless she has any stainless steel jewelry on. .
 
  • #24
point being, the EM field is not exactly harmless to you
 
  • #25
cronxeh said:
point being, the EM field is not exactly harmless to you

Does anyone have any numbers on the EM field strength and range from source?
 
  • #26
I'm going to speculate here, but as far as inducting an electron movement in steel (or any metal for that matter) you'd need a very strong EM field

Edit: holy crap, batman

I just dug up some of the craziest thing I've seen: http://www.powerlabs.org/pssecc.htm
 
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  • #27
I found this article about http://www.ingentaconnect.com/search/expand?pub=infobike://bsc/pace/2003/00000026/00000007/art00011. They found no alteration in pacing following exposure to the EM field of the stove. Now this doesn't rule out acute exposures to the hand in our specific case or long-term exposure effects (the literature on that is considerable and arguably undecided), but the article did list the strength of field generated in their stove.

...ranged from 15-25 kHz generating a magnetic field of 4-25 microT on the saucepan's base, of 2-6 microT at a distance of 20 cm and <2 microT 50 cm in front of the induction oven.

The article also included an interesting table on other household appliances and their associated magnetic flux densities, here are some interesting values (all in microT):

blenders 3-10, electric ranges 2-20, microwave ovens 10-30, can openers 50-150

so it would seem that these stoves don't generate anything considerably higher than most common appliances.
 
  • #28
cronxeh said:
point being, the EM field is not exactly harmless to you
Ever had an MRI scan done? I don't think an EM field is harmful.
 
  • #29
i had MRI taken few months ago, and it was soo noisy inside. they gave me even earplugs for protection.
 
  • #30
Monique no I havent. Although this technology is new, my point being is that prolonged EM exposure might cause cancer, considering the strong EM fields and their interactions on a biophysical level when protein folding occurs.
 
  • #31
How do you know that protein folding is altered by an electromagnetic field? Nuclear magnetic resonance is used to determine protein structure, and this is done in a 900 MHz magnetic field by a 21.1 Tesla magnet.
 
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  • #32

Related to Why Is Our Blood Red and How Does Induction Heating Work?

What is a cool stove with induction heating?

A cool stove with induction heating is a type of cooking appliance that uses electromagnetic induction to heat up the cookware directly, rather than heating up the surface of the stove. This results in faster and more efficient cooking, as well as a cooler surface of the stove.

How does induction heating work?

Induction heating works by using an alternating electric current to create a magnetic field. When a compatible cookware is placed on the stove, the magnetic field induces an electric current in the cookware, which then heats up the cookware and its contents.

What are the advantages of using a cool stove with induction heating?

There are several advantages to using a cool stove with induction heating. These include faster cooking times, energy efficiency, precise temperature control, and a cooler surface of the stove, which reduces the risk of burns and makes cleaning easier.

Is induction heating safe?

Yes, induction heating is generally considered safe. Since the heat is generated directly in the cookware, the surface of the stove remains relatively cool and reduces the risk of burns. However, it is important to use compatible cookware and follow safety precautions, such as not touching the surface of the stove while it is in use.

Are there any disadvantages to using a cool stove with induction heating?

One potential disadvantage of using a cool stove with induction heating is that it requires compatible cookware, which can be more expensive than traditional cookware. Additionally, the initial cost of the stove itself may be higher compared to traditional stoves. However, the energy efficiency and other benefits may offset these costs in the long run.

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