Why something but not nothing.

  • Thread starter John Bartle
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In summary, this conversation is not of a particularly edumacated guy's caliber, and he doesn't seem to have much to contribute to a philosophical discussion. However, he does ask a question about why something exists, and not nothing, and reflects on whether the answer X satisfactorily closes the knowledge gap.
  • #1
John Bartle
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I'm not a particularly edumacated guy, but I wonder about things sometimes. Right now I'm wondering why something but not nothing. Why does anything exist, and not nothing? My real question, however, is below.

Unfortunately, because I'm not really smart I don't suppose I will have much to contribute to any possible consequential post.

It seems to me that "something" may be ABSOLUTELY logically necessary as opposed to "nothing". The first part of my reason for this would be the proposition that ABSOLUTE limitlessness in EVERY way is ABSOLUTELY logically incoherent. Absolute limitlessness entails that any and all reality, including logic, is incompatible and inapplicable with limitlessness. The reason would be that every boundary that differentiates the precise reality of everything would be utterly contradicted and defied by "this" limitless thing. This is logically incoherent.

The second part of my reasoning would be that nothing sounds an awful lot like limitlessness. IF nothing actually is limitlessness then, apparently, absolute nothing is impossible just as absolute limitlessness is impossible. What I'm really wondering is, does absolute nothing seem equivalent to absolute limitlessness?
 
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  • #2
A good way to work whether a question is meaningful is sensible is to ask yourself - 'what sort of answer would satisfy me?'. The hypothetical answer doesn't have to be true. It just has to be something that, if it were true, would seem to appropriately close the gap in knowledge at which the question is trying to point.

If you can find such a hypothetical answer, which will be of the form 'because X is the case', then ask the question - 'why is X the case?'. Then reflect on whether you feel the answer X has really closed the knowledge gap at all.
 
  • #3
Thread closed. The question, such as it is, appears to be philosophical in nature, a category that is strictly limited at this site. From the forum rules:
https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/physics-forums-global-guidelines.414380/ said:
Philosophical discussions are permitted only at the discretion of the mentors and may be deleted or closed without warning or appeal.
 

1. Why is there something rather than nothing?

This question has been pondered by philosophers and scientists for centuries. The most widely accepted answer is that the universe began with the Big Bang, a massive explosion that created all matter and energy in the universe. However, the ultimate cause of the Big Bang is still unknown.

2. How did the universe come into existence?

The current scientific theory is that the universe began with the Big Bang. This theory is supported by evidence such as the cosmic microwave background radiation, the expansion of the universe, and the abundance of light elements. However, the exact cause of the Big Bang is still a mystery.

3. What existed before the universe?

This question is difficult to answer because the concept of "before" may not apply to the universe. The Big Bang is considered the beginning of time, so it is not possible to discuss what came before it. Some scientists propose the idea of a multiverse, where our universe is just one of many existing simultaneously.

4. Why does the universe seem fine-tuned for life?

This question refers to the idea that the fundamental physical constants and laws of the universe are perfectly suited for the existence of life. Some scientists argue that this is just a coincidence, while others propose the idea of a multiverse where the conditions for life are more likely to occur.

5. Will we ever know the true reason for the existence of the universe?

It is impossible to say for certain, but scientists are constantly working to understand the origins of the universe. With advances in technology and new theories being developed, it is possible that we may one day have a better understanding of the ultimate reason for the existence of the universe.

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