Why the black objects absorb more light and heat from the other color objects?

  • #26
jambaugh
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I think a very small portion of the absorbed energy is released.

It may be a matter of semantics. The object will warm until it reaches an equilibrium temperature at which the thermal emission equals the energy being absorbed. (Or it releases some of that energy convectively and diffusively).
 
  • #27
DaveC426913
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As the person who spurred the "what is heat" sub-discussion, I'd like to ask that we return to the OP's question. I think the answers are getting a little too academic to really be helping the OP. So:

"Why is kinetic energy == heat , for every substance?"
 
  • #28
Andy Resnick
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As the person who spurred the "what is heat" sub-discussion, I'd like to ask that we return to the OP's question. I think the answers are getting a little too academic to really be helping the OP. So:

"Why is kinetic energy == heat , for every substance?"

It's not. The confusion is between temperature and heat.

Temperature represents a thermodynamic state of a system, and in many simplified systems a unique temperature can be assigned based on the distribution of kinetic energy amongst the individual elements. Temperature is an equilibrium concept- a system not in thermodynamic equilibrium may not have a unique temperature.

Heat is associated with a thermodynamic process, the transition of a system from one state to another. The specific heat of a material represents the amount of additional energy required to raise the temperature by a certain amount.
 

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