Why Was College Physics HW Moved to K-12 HW?

  • Thread starter ibnuts
  • Start date
In summary, the thread was moved because the problems in the thread were too simple for high school students.
  • #1
ibnuts
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I was wondering why my thread was moved from College HW to K-12 HW. I'm a sophomore in college and this is calc-based college physics HW.
 
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  • #2
As long as it wasn't closed or deleted,i should say it's good news...?:wink:

The problem was really simple.Actually I'm amazed myself of how simple some of the problems in college HW forum are.Some of them are too simple for high school,even...

Daniel.
 
  • #3
dextercioby said:
As long as it wasn't closed or deleted,i should say it's good news...?:wink:

The problem was really simple.Actually I'm amazed myself of how simple some of the problems in college HW forum are.Some of them are too simple for high school,even...

Daniel.

Yes, it was a simple problem that I complicated by making a mistake.

However, it's still a college class. The fact remains you don't send someone in college to get tutored for Algebra at the Elementary school because they never learned it properly. They go to the college math center. With all due respect, I find many Physicists/Engineers all together far too snobby and conceited, just because they have one kind of intelligence. This may have been an easy problem, but there's no reason to judge people for it because they don't catch on as quickly as you do.
 
  • #4
I am not sure who moved your problem, I do not move problems between the homework forums.

I will say that it is very difficult to distinguish between HS and freshman Sophomore college level problems. Generally when moving from the physics forums to Homework, if it does not require differential equations, it goes in the HS forum. I am not sure what difference is makes, where the problem resides, as long as you get the help you need.
 
  • #5
ibnuts said:
Yes, it was a simple problem that I complicated by making a mistake.
:smile: I like the way you said that! They're all easy until you make a mistake, aren't they? :biggrin:

The important thing is you got the help you needed. I'm sure no insult or offense was intended by the move. FWIW, one of the HW moderators is new to moderating and is still learning the ropes. It might have been an accident of moving the wrong post.
 
  • #6
Moonbear said:
FWIW, one of the HW moderators is new to moderating and is still learning the ropes. It might have been an accident of moving the wrong post.
FWIW, that HW moderator has not yet pulled any ropes. :wink:
 
  • #7
Gokul43201 said:
FWIW, that HW moderator has not yet pulled any ropes. :wink:
:biggrin: Hehe, blame the newbie mentor. :wink:

Just wait until you go to post a reply and accidently hit "edit" and you totally erase the member's post by accident and it can't be retrieved. (not that I've ever done that) :redface:
 
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  • #8
Integral said:
I am not sure what difference is makes, where the problem resides, as long as you get the help you need.

The move of a thread indirectly tells the poster "you screwed up something here. you posted in the wrong place".

It is kind of annoying to the poster when in fact the poster didn't break any rules.

So it isn't just an issue of whether or not the poster gets the help.
 
  • #9
learningphysics said:
The move of a thread indirectly tells the poster "you screwed up something here. you posted in the wrong place".
That really is not why most threads are moved and should not be taken that way. It is not that the poster made a mistake, but the moderator feels that more beneficial replies will come from the new location. There should have been a link in the original forum to the new location though so that it could easily be found.
 
  • #10
Evo said:
Just wait until you go to post a reply and accidently hit "edit" and you totally erase the member's post by accident and it can't be retrieved. (not that I've ever done that) :redface:
I have a tendency to do that.. but always find out in time when I don't see any quote brackets :redface: :biggrin:
 
  • #11
Evo said:
It is not that the poster made a mistake, but the moderator feels that more beneficial replies will come from the new location.

Ah I see. :redface: That's a very good reason to move a thread. Thanks for the clarification.
 
  • #12
Gokul43201 said:
FWIW, that HW moderator has not yet pulled any ropes. :wink:

Well, we wouldn't want you to be a mentor too long without some member complaining about your moderating, would we? You'd feel all left out. If you all didn't chase the crackpots away so quickly, I wouldn't have to be the one to do the dirty work. :biggrin:
 
  • #13
Evo said:
Just wait until you go to post a reply and accidently hit "edit" and you totally erase the member's post by accident and it can't be retrieved. (not that I've ever done that) :redface:
:smile: Now I suddenly understand someone's comment in a thread long ago about making it quote-proof or edit-proof or something like that...was it Chroot or Tom Mattson maybe who replied that they've learned to copy and paste to quote instead? (Oh, no, now it sounds like I've memorized all the PF posts...isn't that scary? Actually, I know it had to have been a male moderator who made the comment, because I have a natural tendency to store away anything men say that I might be able to use against them in an argument later. :biggrin:) Though I still don't know what they did to make it edit-proof.
 
  • #14
Thanks for all the replies. The reason I was upset was because it did make me feel like I had done something wrong.

Also, if the college HW usuallly is only for problems that require diff eqs then almost my entire class wouldn't be considered college physics. Then again, there are people in the class that had AP physics and are still having to work hard at it. So, I still feel there is a difference between college calc-based physics and even AP/High School Physics.
 
  • #15
ibnuts said:
Thanks for all the replies. The reason I was upset was because it did make me feel like I had done something wrong.

No reason to be upset or worry about it. Even if you had put it in the wrong forum, getting confused between the two homework forums is one of the most minor of mistakes you could make around here. :smile: Our international friends have even more trouble as their educational systems don't necessarily align with ours that well either.

Also, if the college HW usuallly is only for problems that require diff eqs then almost my entire class wouldn't be considered college physics. Then again, there are people in the class that had AP physics and are still having to work hard at it. So, I still feel there is a difference between college calc-based physics and even AP/High School Physics.

There really isn't much of a difference depending on the high school and college. AP classes are supposed to be college level too, that's the whole point of them, so you can place out of some of those introductory college classes. I really haven't seen anyone move questions back and forth between those two forums before, usually it's from another forum into homework help, in which case the mentor uses their best judgement (good guess) of where to put it, or from homework help out into some other forum that's more appropriate.

But, quite simply, you did nothing wrong. If you're in college and asking about a college assignment, then you're perfectly right to post in the college homework help section. Don't fret about it. Hopefully whoever moved it will see this thread and might contact you by PM to offer some explanation, if there is one. It still remains possible it was an accident.

Oh, and by the way, welcome to PF. I hope you'll choose to stick around and not let this little issue continue to upset you.
 
  • #16
Evo said:
:biggrin: Hehe, blame the newbie mentor. :wink:

Just wait until you go to post a reply and accidently hit "edit" and you totally erase the member's post by accident and it can't be retrieved. (not that I've ever done that) :redface:

I've done worse on my own forum. I went for the delete post button, hit the delete topic button. Oh nuts...
 
  • #17
what ever happens, please do not delete any thread or post in this forum
this site is cool, it rocks, it rules
as valuable as discussions with professors
I wonder if there is any limit to the size of the forum?is there any bandwidth limit?
 
  • #18
ibnuts said:
I was wondering why my thread was moved from College HW to K-12 HW. I'm a sophomore in college and this is calc-based college physics HW.
Beats me why your thread was moved, but please don't take it personally!

This can sometimes happen when the same problem is posted to multiple forums then gets moved around. (Don't know if you did that.)

I've never moved a thread from one homework forum to the other, but I've certainly moved scores of threads from other forums to one of the homework help ones.

As Integral notes, it is sometimes very difficult to tell (especially for an old goat like me) what belongs in HS versus College. When in doubt:
(A) I look up the poster's profile. If they ID themselves as a high school or college student, I take them at their word. Unfortunately, many members do not make it that easy. In that case...
(B) I compare the problem to a formula sheet used for HS Physics exams. If, in my opinion, those formulas cover the problem, it goes in the K-12 section.​
 

Related to Why Was College Physics HW Moved to K-12 HW?

1. Why was college physics homework moved to K-12 homework?

There could be a few reasons for this. One possible explanation is that the college curriculum is becoming more focused on specialized courses, leaving less room for general education classes like physics. Another reason could be to better prepare students for college by introducing them to physics concepts earlier on.

2. Will moving college physics homework to K-12 affect the difficulty or content of the homework?

It is possible that the difficulty or content of the homework may change. College-level physics may involve more complex equations and concepts, while K-12 physics may focus more on basic principles and hands-on experiments. However, this may vary depending on the specific curriculum and teacher.

3. How will this change impact students' college preparation?

It is difficult to say for certain as every college and university has their own requirements and expectations. However, exposure to physics concepts at an earlier age can help students develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills that are valuable in college and beyond.

4. Is this a nationwide change or is it specific to certain schools or regions?

This change may vary depending on the school, district, or state. Some schools or districts may have already implemented this change, while others may not have. It is best to check with your local education authorities or school to see if this change applies to you.

5. What resources are available to help students with K-12 physics homework?

There are many resources available to help students with K-12 physics homework, including textbooks, online tutorials, and educational apps. Additionally, students can seek help from their teachers, peers, or tutors if they are struggling with understanding a concept or completing an assignment.

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