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Wien's law

  1. May 18, 2009 #1
    here's the question:

    'Darwin is a proposed space mission to detect thermal radiation from Earth-like
    planets.
    Estimate the best wavelength for carrying out observations with Darwin.'

    i'm guessing we need to use wien's law(from an earlier part of the question), and so we need the absolute temp in kelvin to calculate the wavelength. but the problem is i thought T=-273, so putting this into wien's law gives a negative wavlength.

    can anyone tell me what i'm doing wrong.

    thanks in advance
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 19, 2009 #2

    tiny-tim

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Welcome to PF!

    Hi wyse! Welcome to PF! :smile:

    T is the temperature of the Earth-like planet, ie the temperature Celsius plus 273 :wink:
     
  4. May 19, 2009 #3

    jtbell

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    Staff: Mentor

    Since when can an absolute temperature be negative? :smile:
     
  5. May 19, 2009 #4
    thanks for the replies, i don't know where i got the negative from.

    cheers!
     
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