Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Windows 10 advantages

  1. Jul 7, 2016 #1

    mathman

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I have 2 pc's (desktop and notebook), both on Windows 7. What would I gain (or lose) by switching to Windows 10?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 7, 2016 #2

    Borg

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I haven't heard much good about Windows 10. It cuts you off from being able to configure certain aspects of Windows Update and I have had several people tell me about issues after they have let it install (printers not being recognized, software no longer working, etc.). I personally won't go near it.
     
  4. Jul 7, 2016 #3

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

    You would gain a more potentially secure system on your machines. Windows 7 has been out there for a lot longer and there may still be zero days that have yet to be exploited. Windows 10 undoubtedly has zero days but they have yet to be discovered so you're in a race to stay safe as you stay current.

    Personally, I would consider Ubuntu Linux if you're not tied to any windows specific applications.

    There are far fewer users and the software is more secure meaning its less likely to be the target of hackers.
     
  5. Jul 7, 2016 #4

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Just as an example of what borg mentioned, I just got my wife a brand new Windows 10 laptop, and it will NOT allow the side button (which I always use for magnify) on a Comfort Optical Mouse 3000 to work. I try downloading the proper driver to allow me to do that and Windows 10 INSISTS that it already has the best possible driver for the mouse and it won't download a new one, near as I can figure out. If I had bought this for myself, I'd have to send it back since I make heavy use of the magnify.

    Now that Windows 10 has an automatic "Windows 7" (but not quite) mode, it's not nearly as obnoxious as it was when it first came out and most people hated it. Now only lots and lots of people hated it.

    When I was researching new laptops in preparation for the purchase, I found that most of the negative reviews for all of them were not at all about the computer itself but rather about the awfulness of Windows 10.
     
  6. Jul 7, 2016 #5
    In my eyes Windows 10 is the best since XP. I upgraded from 7 early last year and am not looking back. No troubles here.
     
  7. Jul 7, 2016 #6

    ProfuselyQuarky

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    What happened to the Chromebook? :woot:
     
  8. Jul 7, 2016 #7

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Something in it died and I found a great deal on a new laptop so she decided to go with that.
     
  9. Jul 7, 2016 #8

    rcgldr

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    One advantage for gaming is that Microsoft chose to only allow directx 12 on Win 10. I don't know if it will ever be added to Win 7. One complaint about Win 10 is related to privacy, such as data collection (including offline data), but I don't know how much of this can be turned off. You can do a web search on this for how to turn off some of these options and also how to turn off One Drive (a cloud service). Another complaint is forced automatic updates.

    Currently I have a system with components (motherboard, video card, sound card, ... ) just old enough to run Win XP, and just new enough to run Win 10. I currently multi-boot between XP Pro, XP Pro X64, and Win 7 64 bit, each on a separate hard drive (I have 4 hard drives on my system). I did a clean install of Win 10 onto the system, it runs, but added an additional layer to the multi-boot menu system, in this case some type of graphical interface at boot up, that adds about 30 seconds to the boot time if I want to use any of the other operating systems. I did an image restore of Win 7 to uninstall Win 10 and it's boot menu. Since my system is a desktop, there's not much to gain from Win 10 other than directx 12 if I ever buy any games that use it.

    You can try Win 10 for free with a clean install (if you have a spare partition). You don't have to purchase Win 10 until you activate it. Until it's activated, some features are disabled, but I don't know which ones. There is/was no time limit on when you have to activate after installing (this may have changed).
     
  10. Jul 8, 2016 #9

    mathman

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I am under the impression that Windows 10 will be free until July 29. What does activation mean here?
     
  11. Jul 8, 2016 #10

    rcgldr

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    Upgrading from Win 7 to Win 10 is free for a while longer, but if you want to dual boot Win 7 and Win 10 (which would be my case), you need to buy Win 10 (Win 7 is no longer sold). In this case, instead of an upgrade install, a clean install is done, and then you can decide if you want to buy and activate Win 10 after trying it out for a while.

    Another annoyance is that Win 10 changes the partition letter it's installed on to C, but at least it doesn't affect the lettering of any other installed operating systems. Win 7 is similar, changing partition to C if booted from dvd-rom, but if you plan to multi-boot, by booting into XP X64 (required if installing Win 7 64 bit), then do a clean install of Win 7 from XP X64, then it will retain the current partition lettering. Unfortunately it's not possible to do a clean install of Win 10 from Win 7, without any prompting, it immediately starts the upgrade process. In the case of XP and XP X64, the partition letters are not changed, even if installing from dvd-rom.
     
  12. Jul 14, 2016 #11

    mathman

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Update: I tried to install Windows 10 on one of the PC's (desktop) and I got an error message. To complicate matters it asked me to try again, without an option to say no. Eventually I got out of the loop.
     
  13. Jul 14, 2016 #12
    The introduction of Windows 10 was the final nail in the coffin for me. I took the plunge and now solely use Linux in all our computers. (In my case - Ubuntu.) Initially there were some problems but most of them were with me. The rest were some minor driver issues which I have fixed.
     
  14. Jul 15, 2016 #13

    mathman

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I did get Windows 10 onto the desk top (I won't on the notebook). The major nuisance is in transition. I had to hunt down the files containing bookmarks, so I could restore them to my browser. I haven't finished all retrievals.

    I haven't attempted to use any new features.
     
  15. Aug 3, 2016 #14
    The DirectX 12 is supposed to give a 30% boost to graphics.
     
  16. Aug 3, 2016 #15

    mathman

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Update on my experience. Pluses - none so far. Minuses - microphone needs to switch, Microsoft games gone.
     
  17. Aug 7, 2016 #16

    Svein

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Sigh. I cannot understand this tendency to whine about everything new. Personally I have used every Windows version since 2, and the only problems I have had is the inability of certain hardware vendors to read the documentation from Windows and create up-to-date drivers for their hardware. Every time the whiners blame Microsoft instead of trying to understand what's going on.

    And, yes I have used Linux. In my opinion, it is OK for mail and web browsing. Trying to develop something in the Linux world can be a frustrating experience, however. Documentation is mainly at the hacker standard ("No need to document. The code is obvious"). I once spent a month trying to track down libraries that the code insisted on including only to find out that the missing code in question was in some graphical library. It had been included once and discarded, but the links had not been removed.
     
  18. Aug 7, 2016 #17

    mathman

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I wasn't whining, just observing that for my needs there didn't seem to be any value.
     
  19. Aug 10, 2016 #18

    harborsparrow

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Windows 10 advantages: (1) ongoing support from Microsoft, hence more secure, (2) good-enough built-in anti-virus for most folks (Windows Defender), (3) boots in under a minute, (4) uses memory better, so if you open multiple applications simultaneously, it will likely perform better, (5) resilient, few crashes, as compared with most prior versions of Windows, and (6) excellent back-ward compatibility for older programs, assuming you know what to do to achieve this (there are a few steps--I've been intending to blog that).

    And finally, if you don't like its User Experience, you can run the $3 StartIsBack third-party utility to make the user experience almost identical to that of Windows 7. I've tried both and actually still prefer the Win7 UI but I'm using the Win10 one anyway to make sure I'm up-to-date on it.
     
  20. Aug 17, 2016 #19
    And... the best part is that you get the good shepherd, Bill Gates, and company moving into your home keeping a watchful eye on you.
    I wish there was a sarcastic font...
     
  21. Aug 17, 2016 #20

    harborsparrow

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    To keep your privacy, do NOT use a Microsoft logon. Instead, create a local account. It's that simple.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Windows 10 advantages
  1. Windows 10 experience (Replies: 10)

  2. PDF in Windows 10 (Replies: 5)

  3. Windows 10 quirk? (Replies: 2)

Loading...