Windows 10 advantages

  • Thread starter mathman
  • Start date
523
215
Better UI with improved performance. The only thing I dislike is the auto-update feature
You can disable that -- Start > Search box > compmgmt.msc > Services and Applications > Services > Windows Update > Properties > Disabled > Apply

You may also want to disable the Update Orchestrator service.
 

WWGD

Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,137
1,726
I think if you go carefully over the EULA, you may be able to cut down on the snooping and data collection for Megahard.
 
Is Windows 10 really better than Windows 7?
 

WWGD

Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,137
1,726
14,873
4,545
Is Windows 10 really better than Windows 7?
Some people love it, some of us hate it. I think the less computer literate you are the more you are likely to love it because it has moved in the direction of smartphones.
 
32,344
4,130
I think the less computer literate you are the more you are likely to love it because it has moved in the direction of smartphones.
That hits the nail on the head, as far as I'm concerned. For this reason, I hated Win 8. I do not want every application displayed as a rectangle on the screen -- I'm much more comfortable creating a hierarchical file structure into which I can arrange the thousands of files I deal with in a much more logical manner. Win 10 is not as bad as Win 8, from the perspective of the user interface, but that's faint praise.
 

WWGD

Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,137
1,726
AFAIK, the main division is between 2 and 3 and subdivisions within each . You choose either depending on what you want to do. I believe version 3 is more geared towards data analysis than v 2 is.
But more
knowledgeable people here can elaborate on the application for each.
 

symbolipoint

Homework Helper
Education Advisor
Gold Member
5,457
853
That hits the nail on the head, as far as I'm concerned. For this reason, I hated Win 8. I do not want every application displayed as a rectangle on the screen -- I'm much more comfortable creating a hierarchical file structure into which I can arrange the thousands of files I deal with in a much more logical manner. Win 10 is not as bad as Win 8, from the perspective of the user interface, but that's faint praise.
@Mark44 and @phinds: a more flexible and less overmediated interface is available at http://www.classicshell.net/
User learns to mostly ignore that distracting image of clickable tile images, and to look alphabetically for the desired application or program from the left side panel from the Start button. I have TWO programs on Windows 10 which I OFTEN like to use, and for these, I put the tile of each onto the tiles menu. I IGNORE all the other tiles, because they are at least for me, just so much visual junk.
 
523
215
User learns to mostly ignore that distracting image of clickable tile images, and to look alphabetically for the desired application or program from the left side panel from the Start button. I have TWO programs on Windows 10 which I OFTEN like to use, and for these, I put the tile of each onto the tiles menu. I IGNORE all the other tiles, because they are at least for me, just so much visual junk.
You can make your preferred programs stick to the taskbar, too, and ignore the tiles altogether. The Classic Shell interface allows you to let Win 10 look like Win 7 or Win XP, and has an option at the top of the Start menu to let you see the normal Win 10 view. There are many other ways to make Win 10 less obnoxious.
 

Svein

Science Advisor
Insights Author
1,923
579
I really cannot see why users are whining about Windows 10. My desktop looks just like my Windows 7 desktop, Vista desktop, XP desktop...

Put the shortcuts for the icons you use fairly often on the desktop and those you use all the time on the taskbar. 10 minutes - done!
 
523
215
I really cannot see why users are whining about Windows 10.
Perhaps you could find out something about why by clicking here (or more directly, here).

Just one example: why is the search function not as good as it was in XP? In XP, the search doesnt start while the user is still typing in its parameters, it's easy enough to search for text within files, and newer results didn't bump older results out of view during scrolling.

Agent Ransack is one of many good free alternatives to Windows Search.
 
Last edited:
Advantages
1) Its the latest and greatest update of all the windows editions. Even critically acclaimed.
2) From gaming perspective, its got directx 12, which promises high frame rates with future games
3) The UI has been redesigned so the users of windows 7 or earlier can be confromatable using it.
4) The metro/modern apps are redesigned to be comfortable using with mouse and keyboard
5) For windows phone users, better integration with the OS, like seeing the missed calls from mobile, sending text from mobile using windows 10 and lots more
6) Cortana, a virtual personal assistant has made her way to the OS, she can be very useful.
7) General stability and performance has been greatly increased. Windows 7 users would feel like riding Ferrari
8) With windows store, users can access lots of modern/mobile apps like twitter, fb, etc
9) With windows 10, most of the drivers will automatically updated by the OS itself, gone are the days when we used to search drivers of the hardware manually. But still some drivers have to be updated manually
10) New browser called Microsoft Edge is introduced
11) Virtual desktops is introduced
12) Better snap assist
13) I found significant improvement in gaming, especially the frame rates have improved.
 
523
215
Advantages
I agree that Win 10 is not entirely devoid of advantages; it's better than Win 8, which was pretty much a downgrade from Win 7.
1) Its the latest and greatest update of all the windows editions. Even critically acclaimed.
Critically acclaimed compared to what and by whom?
2) From gaming perspective, its got directx 12, which promises high frame rates with future games
Games are designed and written with certain platforms in mind. It's no surprise if MS improves its gaming capabilities in order to draw business away from competitors in that sector. Users who don't play resource-intensive games on Windows don't benefit from it being more gamer-friendly than its predecessors.
3) The UI has been redesigned so the users of windows 7 or earlier can be comfortable using it.
(^ typo corrected) Maybe closely enough for the comfort of some users. MS doesn't favor backward compatibility, and isn't shy about alienating users of its older systems. MS thinks it can rope them into paying for newer stuff, and it doesn't much care about their objections.
4) The metro/modern apps are redesigned to be comfortable using with mouse and keyboard
The bloatware that was designed to sell the product on touch screens is now also usable on other systems.
5) For windows phone users, better integration with the OS, like seeing the missed calls from mobile, sending text from mobile using windows 10 and lots more
Windows phone users are a small minority of Windows 10 users and of phone users.
6) Cortana, a virtual personal assistant has made her way to the OS, she can be very useful.
Cortana is intrusive, and like Edge, is treated preferentially when the user wants it removed from the taskbar.
7) General stability and performance has been greatly increased. Windows 7 users would feel like riding Ferrari
Often Ferrari vehicles have a power-to-weight ratio advantage over other vehicles against which they are tested. Some Win 10 systems, despite having some faster components, can run slower than some Win 7 systems, depending on the workload.
8) With windows store, users can access lots of modern/mobile apps like twitter, fb, etc
That just more of MS trying to get its fingers into every pie it can smell.
9) With windows 10, most of the drivers will automatically updated by the OS itself, gone are the days when we used to search drivers of the hardware manually. But still some drivers have to be updated manually
Device drivers should be, and usually are, supplied by the hardware manufacturers. Most modern mature Linux systems can immediately recognize, and promptly install drivers for, any hardware configuration they encounter, and failing that, can, automatically, find and download them from the net, and install them.
10) New browser called Microsoft Edge is introduced
That's MS trying to push its new browser on users, now that IE has for decades failed miserably compared to its competitors, despite having 'undocumented' OS 'fast paths' available .
11) Virtual desktops is introduced
Introduced? Belatedly -- VirtuaWin is open source (GNU license), leaner, and has more functionality, and it's been around since Win ME.
12) Better snap assist
That's pretty minor.
13) I found significant improvement in gaming, especially the frame rates have improved.
Anecdotal. Better compared to what? Win 7 on an older system?

None of your listed 'advantages', nor all of them, nor those along with others you didn't list, excuses the high-handed elimination of features and functionality that users of prior versions relied upon, or the preferential treatment of the bundled bloatware, or the attempted denial of simple options, such as obscuring prevention of auto-update.

Despite all that, I think that once it's customized appropriately, Win 10 can be a not-too-hateworthy OS for everyday use.

Even so, I still think users are right to object to its annoyances.
 

Borg

Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,809
2,012
Cortana is intrusive, and like Edge, is treated preferentially when the user wants it removed from the taskbar.
100% agree. You can't remove Edge and when I did disable Cortana, the Start menu started having issues. Basically, all of the apps in the Start menu are disabled including the Shut Down and Logout buttons the first time that you open it. You have to then close the Start menu and then open it a second time to see it display the apps correctly. Apparently, everything starts off as disabled until Cortana has checked them or you trigger it by opening the menu the first time.
 
523
215
100% agree. You can't remove Edge and when I did disable Cortana, the Start menu started having issues. Basically, all of the apps in the Start menu are disabled including the Shut Down and Logout buttons the first time that you open it. You have to then close the Start menu and then open it a second time to see it display the apps correctly. Apparently, everything starts off as disabled until Cortana has checked them or you trigger it by opening the menu the first time.
Both Cortana and Edge are apparently both checked for and invoked in Win 10 startup, and both apparently contain code to re-enable themselves and re-install their shortcuts if the user has tried to put them out of sight.

Here's a how-to on eliminating Edge.

Cortana is partly a frontend for SearchUI.exe, which keeps running in the background even when you remove Cortana from the taskbar, and if you try to get rid of Cortana altogether, you may disable the search box, so you can instead follow a more conservative procedure, as documented here.
 

Borg

Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,809
2,012
The .bak trick in the Edge how-to is what I used on Cortana. I had to be REALLY fast because you can't change the name if it's running and it spawns immeadiately after killing the process. As for the Cortana stuff in the second link, I did all of those but I really don't trust that it really limits Cortana unless the process is dead. Unfortunately, having to open the Start menu twice every time I restart my computer is more annoying.

BTW, I am on a brand new Dell Alienware laptop. One of the reasons that I've been poking around in the processes is that it has static in the sound when I first start it up. It tends to clear up after a while but can intermittantly get static again. It seems that Dell and MS have so many processes running to "enhance my experience", that listening to clear music isn't part of the experience that they've deemed as important. From the searches that I've done, this appears to be a common annoyance with some Dell laptops but I have yet to find a workable solution. I even called Dell tech support. They had me update some BIOS firmware and it seemed to go away. However, it came back again. So, if anyone knows how to solve this... :oldbiggrin:
 
523
215
The .bak trick in the Edge how-to is what I used on Cortana. I had to be REALLY fast because you can't change the name if it's running and it spawns immeadiately after killing the process. As for the Cortana stuff in the second link, I did all of those but I really don't trust that it really limits Cortana unless the process is dead. Unfortunately, having to open the Start menu twice every time I restart my computer is more annoying.
I suppose you could start from safe mode command prompt only and do the rename from there ...
BTW, I am on a brand new Dell Alienware laptop. One of the reasons that I've been poking around in the processes is that it has static in the sound when I first start it up. It tends to clear up after a while but can intermittantly get static again. It seems that Dell and MS have so many processes running to "enhance my experience", that listening to clear music isn't part of the experience that they've deemed as important. From the searches that I've done, this appears to be a common annoyance with some Dell laptops but I have yet to find a workable solution. I even called Dell tech support. They had me update some BIOS firmware and it seemed to go away. However, it came back again. So, if anyone knows how to solve this... :oldbiggrin:
This is just an offhand guess, but as I recall, there's a Windows component that determines whether the audio output is shared, or seizable exclusively by a single application, and if that component is frequently getting control momentarily, it may be interacting with the audio driver, and so may prevent it from acting smoothly, and could introduce noisy interruptions. Are you using Intel audio drivers, Windows, or something else?
 

Borg

Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,809
2,012
I suppose you could start from safe mode command prompt only and do the rename from there ...
I did manage to rename it but the Start menu problem forced me to put it bak.
Are you using Intel audio drivers, Windows, or something else?
I'm not sure. I'll have to check when I'm back on it. I think that it's an NVIDIA audio driver but I know that there are Intel drivers floating around as well.
 
523
215

Borg

Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,809
2,012

Borg

Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,809
2,012
I turned off the fast startup yesterday but, before turning it off, I still had the same problem. One especially bad incident was when I opened a new Firefox window and then opened a list of 12 bookmarked pages all at once. Firefox CPU usage went to 100%, audio sounded like a 78 lp record running at 45, the mouse was slow, etc.

This morning after starting, I opened the same 12 tabs and no problems. CPU usage was normal and audio was completely unaffected!
:partytime:

Big Thanks @sysprog :bow:
 
523
215
I turned off the fast startup yesterday but, before turning it off, I still had the same problem. One especially bad incident was when I opened a new Firefox window and then opened a list of 12 bookmarked pages all at once. Firefox CPU usage went to 100%, audio sounded like a 78 lp record running at 45, the mouse was slow, etc.

This morning after starting, I opened the same 12 tabs and no problems. CPU usage was normal and audio was completely unaffected!
:partytime:

Big Thanks @sysprog :bow:
Appreciation from me to you, too, @Borg.
 

Borg

Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,809
2,012
You get all the credit for this one.

I've known for years that you don't want to constantly use hibernate because it causes issues. It would never have crossed my mind that MS would do such a thing to the shutdown option. Finding out that my laptop has been hibernating every time since I bought it 6 weeks ago (and being able to really shut it down) is a lifesaver.
 
523
215
You get all the credit for this one.

I've known for years that you don't want to constantly use hibernate because it causes issues. It would never have crossed my mind that MS would do such a thing to the shutdown option. Finding out that my laptop has been hibernating every time since I bought it 6 weeks ago (and being able to really shut it down) is a lifesaver.
MS is apparently, in its jaundiced-eye view, taking the approach that (given that the HW guys can blame the OS for slow boots) making the boots faster, even at the expense of true renewal, would make some users happier, and would help to further its nefarious agenda to foundationalize its 'OS as a subscription service' paradigm.
 
Last edited:

Want to reply to this thread?

"Windows 10 advantages" You must log in or register to reply here.

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving
Top