Without using a calculator

  • Thread starter ToxicBug
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  • #1
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Can you give the EXACT number of bytes there are in 256 terabytes? If you can, show how you did it.
 

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  • #2
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10000000000 0000000000 0000000000 0000000000 00000000 (in binary) since it is 1024 x 1024 x 1024 x 1024 x 256
 
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  • #3
dextercioby
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1TB=2^{40}B;256TB=2^{48}B=2^{51}b=2Pb

Daniel.
 
  • #4
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You have to give it in decimals, not in binary otherwise its too easy. Daniel your answer is wrong.
 
  • #5
dextercioby
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What do you mean:
256TB=2^{48}B=281474976710656B

Daniel.
 
  • #6
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This sounds sort of like a homework problem. "If you can, show how you did it," said ToxicBug.
 
  • #7
dextercioby
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To me,it sounds like something really stupid...I don't know why i even bothered to answer...:yuck:

Daniel.
 
  • #8
BobG
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I tried just counting up to that number on my fingers and toes, alas I maxed out at 1,048,575. Right now, I have the population of Anchorage, AK working on the problem.

Oh, please, please hurry before too many fingers and toes fall off from frost bite :frown:
 
  • #9
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I just wanted to see if people know the trick for it.

Its a lot easier than that.

You take 2^X,Y where X is the units, for example: 0 - bytes, 1 - kilobytes, 4 - terabytes, etc. Then for Y you find the exponent 2^Y for the number. 256 is 2^8, so the answer is 2^48.
 
  • #10
dextercioby
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And why wasn't my answer right...?BTW,on both posts it coincides with yours...:wink:

Daniel.
 
  • #11
chroot
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ToxicBug,

Exponent notation is not a trick, it's a very normal tool used by almost all mathematicians, engineers, and physicists.

- Warren
 
  • #12
Gokul43201
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ToxicBug said:
You take 2^X,Y where X is the units, for example: 0 - bytes, 1 - kilobytes, 4 - terabytes, etc. Then for Y you find the exponent 2^Y for the number. 256 is 2^8, so the answer is 2^48.
And how is this a decimal representation ?
 
  • #13
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Gokul43201 said:
And how is this a decimal representation ?
Because its decimal numbers, not binary :rolleyes:
 
  • #14
dextercioby
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Good point...He probably meant the 15 digit number...BTW,it's called "BASE 10".

Daniel.
 
  • #15
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2^48 without a calculator?
Wow, i must of been gone way to long. :uhh:
 
  • #16
dextercioby
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Any one can do it,provided he/she has a piece of papaer and a pencil,so let's not exaggerate...

Daniel.
 
  • #17
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2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 ......... that is a lot of twos. I should be doing something else more productive right about now.
 
  • #18
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You would square 1024, square the result, then multiply that by 128.
 
  • #19
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motai said:
2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 ......... that is a lot of twos. I should be doing something else more productive right about now.
I second that.:)
 

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