Wobble of Planetary Core

  • Thread starter LURCH
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  • #26
LURCH
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Regarding the generation of magnetic field, and the work of Dr Lathrop, there is another Topic in Geology about that. This Topic is more about orbital dynamics, so I put it here in CM.
 
  • #27
Nereid
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LURCH: Siesmometers should be able to detect that.
Do you have any references to the detection of seismic events which originate anywhere near the mantle/core boundary?
LURCH: If the core is off-center, in the direction towards the Moon, then it completes only one orbit per month, while the Earth around it revolves once a day. Applying relativity, this means that the core is a solid metal ball in the fluid mantle
The core comprises a solid inner core and a liquid outer core. Above the liquid core is the mantle. Could you restate these two sentences please, distinguising between the solid and liquid core?
 
  • #28
LURCH
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Sorry, I ignored this thread for a really long time! Anyhow:

Originally posted by Nereid
Do you have any references to the detection of seismic events which originate anywhere near the mantle/core boundary?
No, none that originate there, but the seismic evidence from earthquakes proves that a disturbance within the fluid interior of the planet can be detected by seismometers on the surface above. There's and illustration onthis webpage that shows how P-waves propagate through the interior of the planet. Though the waves do not originate in the interior, the method of detection does prove that waves propagate through the fluid interior, and that the impact of these waves on the underside of the crust can be detected by seismometers.


The core comprises a solid inner core and a liquid outer core. Above the liquid core is the mantle. Could you restate these two sentences please, distinguising between the solid and liquid core?
Quite right, the statement would have been better phrased as the Inner Core being off center within the Outer Core. I'm sure that this is what my friend was asking about, a solid executing small orbits within a liquid. Surely, this would have to send pressure waves that would strike the underside of the crust at regular intervals (once every 24 hours). Such waves should be detectable by seismometers, but I have heard nothing about the them ever be detected.
 
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