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Wok it to me

  1. Dec 26, 2007 #1

    wolram

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    I am looking for ideas for wok food, spicy hot beef, lamb or pork based.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 26, 2007 #2

    turbo

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    Where to start, Woolie? Have you Googled on Chinese recipes? I'll bet you'll get some great stuff right off the bat.

    I don't really have any recipes to give you, because we stir-fry with an adventurous attitude and the willingness to use stuff that is on-hand. If there is a left-over piece of cooked steak or roast or poultry, we often chop that and brown it in hot oil with vegetables. If it's rare meat, then we chop it into reasonable-sized pieces and cook it in the wok before adding the vegetables. Try to leave the vegetables "al dente" so they've got some crispness to them. This contrasts with the texture of the meat and the softness of the steamed rice. The great thing about a wok is that it is versatile, and doesn't require a lot of cooking oil.

    Vegetables we use commonly include onions, minced garlic, carrots, green peppers, green beans (in season), shredded cabbage, mushrooms, etc. It's not necessary to buy special Chinese produce to whip up a nice wok meal.

    For heat, you might get 'hold of a bottle of chili oil, or use cayenne, crushed red pepper, or a spicy curry. I've got access to MANY kinds of hot sauces and relishes because I make my own, so heating up the dish with chili products is pretty wide-open.
     
  4. Dec 26, 2007 #3
    spicy beef and veggies

    3 tablespoon peanut oil

    1/2 pound of steak{freeze for 30 minutes cut into thin strips across the grain}
    4 green onions, cut into 1 inch chunks
    2 garlic cloves, I just smash them
    1 small hot pepper cut into strips
    snow peas and brocolli{also cut into bite sized chunks}
    2 cups of cooked rice
    2 teasoppns hot chilli powder
    1 cup of beef broth {cold} Plus one teaspoon corn starch. Mixed well.

    heat the oil...add the meat, onions and garlic, stirring often, untill browned
    add the pepper and veggies, stir untill they turn bright color
    add the two cups of cooked rice and chilli powder

    stir to mix well, then push it up the walls of your wok
    put the beef broth/starch mix into the bottom of the walk and stir untill it thickens
    then mix everything together.....and enjoy~!

    make sure to season your wok, if it a metal one.
     
  5. Dec 26, 2007 #4

    Evo

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    Another good one hypatia, so <cough> when are we going to be invited to your place for dinner? o:)
     
  6. Dec 26, 2007 #5

    Astronuc

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    Too bad the thread title isn't "Wok this way". :biggrin: But one would have to appreciate Aerosmith.

    Wok's are great.

    I'd modify hypatia's recipe to make the 1 small hot pepper cut into strips into multiple hot peppers. I love Kung Pao and General Tso's chicken, and Mongolian or Sichuan beef with a heat rating of 20+ on a scale of 1 to 10. :biggrin: Well I love Sichuan (Szechuan) cuisine period.
     
  7. Dec 26, 2007 #6

    turbo

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    "Wok like an Egyptian" (Bangles) "Wokking in Memphis" (Marc Cohn) or more appropriately for Woolie, "Wok of Life" by Dire Straits. :tongue2:

    Sorry for the lack of useful suggestions, Woolie, but cooking with a wok is kind of a free-style event for me.
     
  8. Dec 26, 2007 #7

    Astronuc

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    Lou Reed - "Wok on the Wild Side" :biggrin:

    She says hey babe, take a Wok on the wild side
    Said hey honey, take a Wok on the wild side


    :rofl:


    BTW - I prefer to use cashews instead of peanuts.
     
  9. Dec 26, 2007 #8

    wolram

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    Number one, why is it that no one who likes my food will marry me?
     
  10. Dec 26, 2007 #9

    turbo

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    Did they just say they liked your food or did they go back for seconds and challenge you for the last helpings? My female cousin and her two cute daughters (now in their 20's) had no trouble fighting over the last piece of pizza, the last spicy grilled shrimp, the last pieces of my spicy hickory-smoked marinated stead strips, etc. When they got into good-natured challenges about who gets the last of the goodies, I was pretty sure that my cooking passed muster. It was kind of firmed up when I'd meet one of the girls' friends and they'd say "Oh, you're the guy who cooks the good treats!"

    Practice on your wok skills, hone a good base recipe, then invite a nice lady over, and share a bit of wine while you whip up a tasty dish using basic, cheap, ingredients and some seasonings. Serve over a bed of freshly-steamed basmati rice (nice nutty odor/flavor) and watch her melt. Aside from your rice steamer, you'll have dirtied a wok, your wok spatula, a chef's knife, and the plates and utensils you ate with, and dinner will be ready in minutes. That will impress the hell out of her. She may not propose, but she'll probably wrangle another invitation and maybe volunteer to learn how to cook like you did.
     
  11. Dec 26, 2007 #10

    Evo

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    I'll marry you Wolram if you will buy me some fuzzy animal slippers and a soft, thick furry robe. I must warn you, I'm still covered with flea bites.

    So, will I be Evoram or Wolvo?
     
  12. Dec 26, 2007 #11
    I know you didnt ask for chicken recipes, and this one isn't even spicy but....
    Throw some chicken in your wok with some cooking oil and salt and pepper. My dad and uncle were celebrating their dual birthday with a river trip a years or so ago, and we had some friends of ours along, (they were big people, and big people like food and often make good eats) and the guy of the couple had a really cool wok, made out of a blade from a tractor's tilling setup, welded and ground flat in the center where the whole was, with a heavy duty propane stove burner welded to the bottom. That thing was awesome, we ate everything from it for a weekend.
     
  13. Dec 26, 2007 #12

    Astronuc

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    Evoram is better. But wouldn't that be - Evoewe? :biggrin: Or maybe Wolewe would be better - at least phonetically so.
     
  14. Dec 26, 2007 #13

    Danger

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    Sounds awsome, but I think that he meant something that serves more than one. :tongue:
     
  15. Dec 26, 2007 #14

    Danger

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    Ask Kia's mother; she must have some sort of insight. By the way, where the hell is Kia?
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2007
  16. Dec 27, 2007 #15

    wolram

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    Kias mom left me because i could not support a flock of horses and dogs, my gf before that left me to marry some rich guy (when i was penniless) and my gf before left me because i gave her gravel rash, and the one before that was a civil servants daughter, and we got caught in the act by daddy, they moved.
     
  17. Dec 27, 2007 #16

    wolram

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    I will go kill one of the sheep and get you a fleece, and i will tend your bites, you will forget you have them within 30 mins
     
  18. Dec 27, 2007 #17

    wolram

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    Can you give me a blend of spices that will give a smooth hot hotness?
     
  19. Dec 27, 2007 #18
    This is how we Thais cook fried rice. Much better than what you can get at a Chinese take out


    -2 cups JASMINE rice
    -2 table spoons oil (vegetable or peanut)
    -white pepper (or black if that's the only thing available)
    -2-3 cloves garlic
    -1 thai hot pepper/or other hot pepper (optional)
    -1/4 c cilantro (optional)
    -2-4 green onions
    -meat sliced thin
    -2-3 tablespoons of fish sauce (secret ingredient)
    -2 eggs


    Cook rice and chill (MUST BE COLD). Heat oil in wok and fry garlic. Add and cook meat. Add and cook onions, cilantro, and hot pepper. Very lightly beat eggs. Add rice and eggs at the same time. Stir constantly until rice is coated with eggs and cooked. Add the fish sauce and stir rice. 2-3 tablespoons are usually enough but you can add more if desired. Season with white pepper to taste.


    Don't add any salt, the fish sauce is salty enough. Also don't use soy to make fried rice, fish sauce tastes much better. You can also add any vegetables that you want and cook them before you add the eggs and rice. Normally Thai fried rice doesn't have that many vegetables in it though. Thai fried rice is much better because it is much less greasy. I normally like to add basil to mine too. Thai hot peppers might be hard to find, so if you can't find them you could just also simply use the crushed hot peppers that you use on pizza to spice things up. Also make sure your wok is very hot while cooking, after all that is the whole point of having a wok.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2007
  20. Dec 27, 2007 #19

    turbo

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    If you want "smooth" hotness, you'll want a complex blend of hot ingredients, like curry powder, ground black pepper, and ground cayenne. It probably wouldn't hurt to toss in some paprika, too. The curry powder we use is made of coriander, turmeric, fenugreek, corn flour, salt, cumin, red pepper, ginger allspice, nutmeg and capsicum (for added heat). If you can find some chili oil, that would go well in there too. It usually comes in small bottles and can be found in the Chinese food section of large supermarkets.

    The secret to making something hot, but not overwhelmingly so is to use small amounts of lots of different kinds of hot stuff, so that the heat "blooms" in your mouth gradually, and stay away from crushed red pepper and other hot stuff that comes in relatively large fragments. If you have a food processor, you can blend up a seeded fresh jalapeno pepper with fresh garlic and add that early, while you are cooking the meat. Jalapeno is not really hot, and it has a nice flavor. If you blend it up, it will be finely-divided enough so that you won't get big chunks in the final product and it will contribute to the "smooth" heat. Good luck, Woolie. Just jump in and experiment. The worst that can happen is that you produce some food that is not really exciting the first few times, until you get the hang of it.
     
  21. Dec 27, 2007 #20

    wolram

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    That rice sounds good i will keep a copy of that post.
    Thanks gravenewworld.

    Hey, Turbo look what i found

    http://www.chillipeppersonline.co.uk/first.html

    I was thinking of buying a mixed bag, can i preserve them without to much fuss?
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2007
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