Women's heart disease awareness what about men?

  1. Hurkyl

    Hurkyl 16,089
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I learned today of National Wear Red Day, meant to show support for women's heart disease awareness.


    I cannot find a comparable "men's heart disease awareness" movement -- is there just cause for such gender discrimination?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. But that I too am sad because of the non-existence of profound articles on the subject except rumors so far not because there has been no gender balance.
     
  4. russ_watters

    Staff: Mentor

    People considered to be in priveledged groups are not allowed to be addressed directly. You can have a National Organization for Women (or "Colored People") but not one for men or whites, for example. Yes, it is a double standard.
     
  5. Ivan Seeking

    Ivan Seeking 12,535
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    http://www.norm.org/

    There is no organization like this for women. QED.
     
  6. Presumably awareness of male heart disease is abundant and reflects the risk. Presumably the risk of women getting haert disease is higher than woman are aware. If so such an organisation is wholly neccesary.

    By the same note why would you need a "National organisation for whites/men" as Russ puts it?

    What exactly would such an organisation promote?

    RE NORM:
    Needless Male circumcision is a very worthy subject for an organisation, hence NORM. Poeple don't realise that Male circumcision is only neccesary in a tiny minority (I think < 2%) of cases. So why do > 80% of american males get circumcised? because it makes money. It's barbaric and ammoral yet american society welcomes it.

    In Britain, it is very rare for male babies to be circumcised, why? because we have an NHS and as such recognise pointless procedures.

    rant end
     
  7. Astronuc

    Staff: Mentor

    There are organizations such as YMCA (Young Men's Christian Association) as opposed to the YWCA. Somewhat more exclusive is Promise Keepers. If one wants extreme, let us not forget the KKK, Aryan Nation and numerous other organizations that were at one time exclusively white male.

    Anyway - Women still 2nd-class citizens when it comes to heart disease
    http://www.baltimoreexaminer.com/local/0202heartdisease38785577.html

    Traditionally, the bulk research into heart disease and its diagnosis and treatment has been focussed on men, largely to the exclusion of women. That started to change during the 1980's, when some research programs started to focus on women.

    I don't see gender discrimination is a group that helps women achieve parity with men. The American Heart Association has all the information that men and women need regarding cardiovascular disease and problems such as heart attack.

    There is also - http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/actintime/index.htm

    and - http://www.womenheart.org/

    If men don't know about heart disease and cancer, then they haven't been paying attention. There have been lot's of public service announcements and advertisements about health, particularly heart disease. It is well known that diet and excercise can help prevent or otherwise minimize risk of heart (cardiovascular) disease and cancer.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2009
  8. Gokul43201

    Gokul43201 11,141
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

  9. Astronuc

    Staff: Mentor

  10. Hurkyl

    Hurkyl 16,089
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The whole point of this thread is that I don't want to presume... I want to know. I feel inspired to have an opinion on the topic, and I'm going to make darned sure I adhere to my own standards for such things.


    You wouldn't -- the government could just promote heart disease awareness, without restricting to a single gender. Or, if the gender differences warrant it, the government could promote both men's and women's heart disease awareness as separate programs.

    If the things you want to presume were actually true, then that would warrant the existence of a campaign targeted at women. But I don't want to presume.


    (I confess that before learning about National Wear Red Day, I didn't know that men had a greater risk than women. Maybe I had heard it once, but had long since forgotten)
     
  11. Thanks to your thread, I just cleared up a misconception that I had about testosterone being harmful to men's heart health. It seems that just the opposite is what they have learned recently. This article is worth a read.

    http://www.healthcentral.com/heart-disease/c/1435/51679/testosterone

     
  12. mgb_phys

    mgb_phys 8,952
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I think in this case it is because there is an assumption that heart disease is a male problem = middle aged guys have heart attacks, and so there is a need to get the message across to women.

    A more serious example would be the attention given to, and massive screening programs for, breast and cervical cancer compared to the the much more common prostate cancer.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2009
  13. Monique

    Monique 4,699
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Did you already read this page? http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/hearttruth/whatis/index.htm
     
  14. Monique

    Monique 4,699
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I looked up the information, here a study that likely contributed to the start of the campaign.

    Awareness, Perception, and Knowledge of Heart Disease Risk and Prevention Among Women in the United States
    And a comment that accompanies the paper: Heart Disease Prevention in US Women
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2009
Know someone interested in this topic? Share a link to this question via email, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?