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Work and friction?

  1. Jun 15, 2010 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    a little boy, with a mass of 40 kg, gets in his sled and slides down from the top of a 30 m high snowy slope. he reaches the bottom of the hill with a speed of 20 m/s. was the hill frictionless and if not, how much work was done by friction while the boy was sliding?

    3. The attempt at a solution

    all i can do is draw what is happening i don't know what equations to start with
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 15, 2010 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Hint: Compare the initial mechanical energy with the final mechanical energy.
     
  4. Jun 15, 2010 #3
    ok so i enter Wnc= Ef-Ei which = (1/2mvfinal^2 + mgh)-(1/2mvintial^2+mgh)=-3760 is that the work of friction then since friction is the only nc force? or is there another equation to solve for from there. Thanks for your help by the way
     
  5. Jun 15, 2010 #4

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Yes, that's the work done by friction. That's all you need.
     
  6. Jun 15, 2010 #5
    you have been extremely helpful thanks!

    i have another question i need help with that i posted and can't get an answer to. if you don't mind-A satellite is orbiting above the earth. By what factor must the orbital radius be changed in order to double the period of the orbit?

    I have to solve for two variables T-period and r-radius of satellite but i can't solve for two variables if they are both in the same equations.
     
  7. Jun 15, 2010 #6

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    You've already started a thread on that new problem (https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=410242). See my comments there.

    Hint: You can express T in terms of r.
     
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