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Work, distance, power, and HP

  1. Feb 16, 2009 #1
    nijh
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 16, 2009 #2

    PhanthomJay

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    You have the right equations, so just solve. The assumption is that the lifting is done at a constant speed. What force does the lifter apply?
     
  4. Feb 16, 2009 #3
    you need to convert feet to meters, 1 foot = 0.3048 meters. Then just apply your equations.
     
  5. Feb 16, 2009 #4
    Well I know that W=fd. I have d but not f and I know the equation for f is F=ma, but I don't have a. It seems like i'm going in circles..sorry, I take forever with this.
     
  6. Feb 16, 2009 #5
    The force needed to lift an object at constant velocity is equal to its weight ;), you DO know the force!
     
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