Work Done in Iron-HCl Reaction at 298K

In summary, to calculate the work done when 50 g of iron reacts with HCL to produce hydrogen gas in an open beaker at 298K, you would use the equation W= - P *delta V. Since there is initially no H2 gas, V1 would be the volume of the acid + Fe, and V2 would be V1 + the gas volume. Alternatively, you can use the volume of the gas components, which would be zero initially.
  • #1
zmike
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Homework Statement



calculate the work done when 50 g of iron reacts with HCL to produce hydrogen gas in an open beaker at 298K

Homework Equations



W= - P *delta V

The Attempt at a Solution



P would = 1 but the problem is I wouldn't be able to figure out what the initial volume is :S
I am guess I would assum VP = nRT but that would only give me V2 and delta V = V2 - V1

Should I assume V1= 0? but that doesn't make sense since how can something have 0 volume?
 
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  • #2
Initially, there is no H2 gas, so V1 is whatever the volume of the acid + Fe is. The volume change would be essentially due to the formation of the gas, with negligible change in the volume of the acid+Fe. I.e, V2 is V1 + the gas volume, so ΔV is the gas volume.

Another way to think of it is, at room temperature and 1 atm, the gas phase typically occupies of order 1000 times the volume of liquids and solids, per mole of material. So just use volume of gas components, which would be zero initially.

Hope that helps.
 

Related to Work Done in Iron-HCl Reaction at 298K

1. What is the chemical equation for the iron-HCl reaction at 298K?

The chemical equation for the iron-HCl reaction at 298K is Fe + 2HCl -> FeCl2 + H2.

2. What is the enthalpy change for this reaction?

The enthalpy change for this reaction is exothermic, meaning it releases heat. The exact value of the enthalpy change depends on the specific conditions of the reaction, but it is generally around -92 kJ/mol.

3. How does temperature affect the rate of this reaction?

An increase in temperature generally leads to an increase in the rate of this reaction. This is because higher temperatures provide more energy for the reactant particles to collide and break bonds, leading to a faster reaction.

4. What is the role of iron in this reaction?

Iron acts as the reducing agent in this reaction, meaning it donates electrons to the hydrogen ions in the hydrochloric acid. This produces hydrogen gas and forms iron(II) chloride.

5. What are the potential hazards of this reaction?

The main hazards of this reaction include the corrosive nature of hydrochloric acid and the potential release of flammable hydrogen gas. Proper safety precautions, such as wearing protective gear and working in a well-ventilated area, should be taken when conducting this reaction.

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