Work Energy: block w/ friction

In summary, the problem asks to find the initial speed of a block that travels 10m on a horizontal surface with a coefficient of friction of 0.40 before stopping. The equation for this problem is \SigmaF = max, with \mu = -a / g.
  • #1
schyuler2
8
0

Homework Statement


Find the initial speed of a block which travels 10m along a horizontal surface if [tex]\mu[/tex]= 0.40 between the block and the surface before stopping.


Homework Equations


[tex]\Sigma[/tex]W = 1/2mvB2 - 1/2mvA2 + mgyB - mgyA

[tex]\Sigma[/tex]W = W * dAB * cos (W, dAB)

f = [tex]\mu[/tex]* N
N= mgsin[tex]\theta[/tex]

The Attempt at a Solution


so far i have:
[tex]\Sigma[/tex]W = 0
[tex]\Sigma[/tex]W = WN + WW + Wf

and

[tex]\Sigma[/tex]W = WW * dAB * cos (270)
[tex]\Sigma[/tex]W = WW * 10m * 0


not sure if I'm doing this right or where to go from here
 
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  • #2
This problem requires an equation that you haven't included yet.

So we'll start with:
[tex]\Sigma[/tex]F = max
[tex]\Sigma[/tex]F = Px + fx + Nx + Wx
max = Px + fx+ Nx + Wx

[tex]\mu[/tex] = -a / g
Try to solve it from here.
 
  • #3
.

I would approach this problem by first identifying the known quantities and variables. The known quantities in this problem are the distance traveled (10m), the coefficient of friction (\mu = 0.40), and the acceleration due to gravity (g = 9.8 m/s^2). The variable we are trying to find is the initial speed of the block.

Next, I would draw a free body diagram of the block to visualize the forces acting on it. The block experiences a normal force (N) and a frictional force (f) in the opposite direction of motion. Additionally, there is the force of gravity acting downwards. Using Newton's second law, we can write the equation \Sigma F = ma, where \Sigma F is the sum of all forces acting on the block.

In this case, we can write \Sigma F = ma as follows:

\Sigma F = N - f - mg = ma

We can also write the equation for friction as f = \mu N. Substituting this into the equation above, we get:

N - \mu N - mg = ma

Simplifying this equation, we get:

N = (m + \mu m)g

Now, we can use the equation for work-energy to solve for the initial speed of the block. We can write this equation as:

\Sigma W = 1/2mvB^2 - 1/2mvA^2 + mgyB - mgyA

Since the block starts and stops at the same height, we can eliminate the terms involving y from this equation. Also, since the block starts from rest, vA = 0. Therefore, our equation becomes:

\Sigma W = 1/2mvB^2 - mgyB

We can also write the work done by friction as Wf = f * d, where d is the distance traveled. Substituting this into the equation above, we get:

\Sigma W = 1/2mvB^2 - \mu N * d

Substituting our equation for N from earlier, we get:

\Sigma W = 1/2mvB^2 - \mu (m + \mu m)g * d

Since the block starts and stops at the same height, the change in gravitational potential energy is zero. Therefore, we can simplify this equation further to:

0 = 1/2mvB^2
 

Related to Work Energy: block w/ friction

1. What is work energy and how is it related to a block with friction?

Work energy refers to the physical concept of the transfer of energy from one object to another. In the case of a block with friction, work energy is important because the frictional force acting on the block will do work, transferring energy from the block to the surface it is moving on.

2. How is the work energy equation applied to a block with friction?

The work energy equation is used to calculate the work done on an object by a force. In the case of a block with friction, the equation would include the frictional force and the distance the block moves against the force. This work done would result in a change in the block's kinetic energy.

3. How does friction affect the work energy of a block?

Friction acts in the opposite direction of motion, causing the block to lose kinetic energy as it moves. This decrease in energy is represented in the work energy equation as a negative value for the work done by friction.

4. Can the work energy of a block with friction be negative?

Yes, the work energy of a block with friction can be negative. This is because the frictional force does negative work, meaning it is transferring energy out of the system rather than into it.

5. How can the work energy of a block with friction be used to determine its final velocity?

By using the work energy equation and considering the initial and final kinetic energy of the block, the final velocity of the block can be calculated. This can be useful in determining the speed at which the block will come to a stop due to frictional forces.

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