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Work-Energy Theorem Problem

  1. Feb 10, 2007 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    A driver in a car is on a level road traveling at a speed of "v". He puts on the brakes and they lock and skid rather than roll. I have to use the Work-Energy Theorem to give an equation for the stopping distance of the car in terms of "v". the acceleration of gravity "g" and the coefficient of kinetic friction "u(k)" between the tires and the road.


    2. Relevant equations

    W = EK(f) - EK(i)

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I attempted to use various formulas I have that use friction and gravity but came up to no success. I am hoping someone else knows what they are doing.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 10, 2007 #2

    PhanthomJay

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    You have identified the work done in your formula. What force does this work? How do you calculate it? What is the definition of work?
     
  4. Feb 10, 2007 #3
    The frictional force is the force doing this work. So W = -F(friction)*x. And F(friction) = u(k)mg. So -u(k)mg*x = 0 - (1/2)mv^2 ... and solve for x?
     
  5. Feb 10, 2007 #4

    PhanthomJay

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    Looks good!
     
  6. Feb 10, 2007 #5
    Thank you so much. You were extremely helpful.
     
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