Workshop- Measuring tooth thickness and pitch of a spur gear

In summary, the conversation discusses various methods for measuring tooth thickness and pitch of a spur gear in workshop practice. The use of ANSI B92.1 is recommended for detailed information, and the use of an optical comparator is suggested for less accurate measurements. For accurate measurements required for part acceptance, measurement over pins is commonly used. Additionally, gear gauges can be used for identification purposes, but not for inspection. These gauges can be purchased from McMaster Carr for around $40 to $120.
  • #1
stephen
16
0
Hi all!
I would like to know how, in workshop practice, one would measure the tooth thickness and pitch of a spur gear?
 
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  • #2
If you can reference a copy of ANSI B92.1 you will get a ton of information on spline/gear measurement techniques.

Are you referring for inspection purposes or just general measurement? If accuracy is not a major issue, an optical comparitor is the easiest way that many places will go. If accuracy is required for the acceptance of a part, then measurement over pins is used in most cases. A drawing for the gear will give data on the gear tooth geometry that will be used in inspection. I attached a portion from a drawing as a reference.
 
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  • #3
As Fred points out, there are inspection methods for gear teeth but there are also simple identification methods. I've seen gear gauges used before, they are simply a small piece of metal with gear teeth cut into them. They generally come in sets. You take out each coupon and try to match it to a gear. The one that matches gives you the pressure angle and gear tooth size. Its not meant for inspection, but they're good for identifying a specific gear. If you want to purchase one, they cost about $40 to $120 from McMaster Carr. Type in "gear gauge" and search their catalog.
 
  • #4
Ahhhh...darn it. I knew I forgot the easiest method. They are identical to the thread gauges.
 

Related to Workshop- Measuring tooth thickness and pitch of a spur gear

1. What is the purpose of measuring tooth thickness and pitch in a spur gear?

The purpose of measuring tooth thickness and pitch in a spur gear is to ensure the gear is functioning properly and to identify any potential issues such as wear or misalignment. It also helps to determine the gear's overall performance and efficiency.

2. What equipment is needed to measure tooth thickness and pitch of a spur gear?

To measure tooth thickness and pitch of a spur gear, you will need a gear measuring device such as a gear caliper or micrometer, a gear tooth thickness gauge, and a gear pitch gauge. You may also need a surface plate and a dial indicator for more precise measurements.

3. How do you measure tooth thickness and pitch of a spur gear?

To measure tooth thickness, place the gear on a flat surface and use a gear tooth thickness gauge to measure the distance from the base of the gear tooth to the gear's pitch circle. To measure pitch, use a gear pitch gauge to determine the number of teeth per inch or centimeter on the gear. For more accurate measurements, use a gear caliper or micrometer to measure the tooth thickness and pitch directly.

4. What are the common units of measurement for tooth thickness and pitch of a spur gear?

The common units of measurement for tooth thickness and pitch of a spur gear are inches and millimeters. However, some gear measuring devices may also provide measurements in metric modules or diametral pitch.

5. What are some potential sources of error when measuring tooth thickness and pitch of a spur gear?

Potential sources of error when measuring tooth thickness and pitch of a spur gear include worn or damaged gear teeth, incorrect positioning of the gear on the measuring device, and inaccurate gear measuring equipment. It is important to regularly calibrate and maintain gear measuring equipment to ensure accurate measurements.

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