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Workshop on metalworking

  1. Oct 22, 2005 #1

    siddharth

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    In my college, I have a workshop on metalworking in the first semester which involves obtaining a cube out of a Mild Steel cylindrical rod.
    First, I have to file (using a 14 inch steel file) the upper and lower surfaces of the rod to level. Next, I have to mark a square on one face of the cylinder and then using a hacksaw, I have to cut off three sides. The fourth side must be chiselled using a hammer and a chisel.
    The major problem I have is in chiselling off the fourth side. To me, this looks like an impossible task. After 3 hours of chiselling ( a mild steel rod), I have progressed very little and even hurt my finger with a misplaced blow.
    So, does any College in other countries have tasks which require a lot of physical effort? Or is it mechanised where most of it is performed with the help of automated machines?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 22, 2005 #2
    you could always cheat... Hacksaw it off, but leave a extra space, and then chisel it down the few more milimeters. If you do it well it'll be impossible to tell.
     
  4. Oct 22, 2005 #3
    ok if you where ever to do this in the real world then you would use machines(normally), but they are showing you things which you need to know how to do, ie
    file a block correctly (probably using engineers blue)
    saw a straight line (not as easy as it sounds)
    how to use a chisel. etc etc

    when i started engineering for the first two weeks i cut round bar with a hacksaw, beleive me i have no probs in cutting metal to follow a scribed line and even without one.

    lmao and its not going to be the last time you do this. ;) make sure the chisel doesnt have a mushroomed head.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2005
  5. Oct 22, 2005 #4

    Astronuc

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    I believe some German training programs use this approach.

    The objective is to teach the student to appreciate the difficulties associated with machining a material.

    What kind of chisel? I hope it is hardened.
     
  6. Oct 22, 2005 #5

    siddharth

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    The German Government did offer technical assistance in setting up my college. So I guess that's where this came from. I do "appreciate" the difficulties now!
    I'm using a cold chisel.
     
  7. Oct 22, 2005 #6

    Integral

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    Wow! And I was thinking of lathes and milling machines!

    What are the to lances you need to hold?

    You project sounded fine till you said chisel! That is a bit extreme.

    I once watched a documentary of an old Native American making arrows by hand. His comment "Precision does not know time"
    If you want precision work you have to be patient, filing to a line will teach you this.

    Chiseling even mild steel can only teach frustration. I would recommend a good sharp chisel , see if you can get a chip running?

    Good Luck
     
  8. Oct 22, 2005 #7

    siddharth

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    What are "to lances"?
    What do you mean by "get a chip running"?
     
  9. Oct 22, 2005 #8

    Danger

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    I believe that the old guy meant 'tolerances'. One must allow for his rheumatism and failing eyesight when reading his posts.:tongue:
    If he uses the same terminology that I do, a 'chip' would be a strip of metal that peels off as you chisel under it, sort of like peeling an apple.
     
  10. Oct 22, 2005 #9

    Integral

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    opps! sorry about that my vision is not all that sharp right now. That should read ,,,,tolerances.....

    I initially misspelled it, then assumed that my spell checker had fixed it... Unfortunately it was still wrong.

    When cutting metal with a machine tool (lathe for instance) the thin strip of metal being cut off often forms a long very thin strip which usually curls into a long helix. This is referred to as the "chip" .

    A dull chisel will simply deform the steel it will not remove any material. To actually remove material with a chisel you will need to cut into the metal. Try clamping your "cube to be" into your vise (I hope you have a vise!) with say .5mm above the plane of the vise jaws. Now attack that edge with your chisel, if it is sharp enough you may be able to get under a bit of the steel. Hammer away.

    I do not envy you your task!
     
  11. Oct 22, 2005 #10

    Integral

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    You are exactly correct... even to the cause!

    I guess all it takes is another blind old geezer to understand me!
     
  12. Oct 22, 2005 #11

    Danger

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    :rofl:
    In my case it's arthritis, not rheumatism. The vision thing is irritating for sure. I have to wear my glasses for the monitor here at work, and have to have them off for the one at home.:grumpy:
     
  13. Oct 22, 2005 #12
    don't want to correct you, but why not?

    this is swarf :)
     
  14. Oct 22, 2005 #13

    Danger

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    I thought swarf was that little blue dude from B.C.:confused:
     
  15. Oct 22, 2005 #14
    lmao do you more morf ;)
     
  16. Oct 22, 2005 #15

    Integral

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    Interesting, I have not heard that term. Could it be regional?
     
  17. Oct 22, 2005 #16
  18. Oct 22, 2005 #17

    Danger

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    I didn't pursue that link too deeply, but it appears that 'swarf' is fine-grained particles as opposed to the ribbon-like stuff that we call 'chips'.
     
  19. Oct 22, 2005 #18

    Integral

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    Your link seems to be referring to something different from the chip, which is scrap, not the desired product.

    In this link swarf is the term for the results of a grinding process, yet again something different from the chip produced by a lathe. Though this time it is used to refer to the waste product of grinding.

    I could see where it could be generalized to any waste product. Is this common terminology where you machine?
     
  20. Oct 22, 2005 #19
    I worked in machine shops here in San Diego for ten years. If you called chips swarf no one would know what the heck you were talking about.
     
  21. Oct 22, 2005 #20
    No, that's smurf. Different.
     
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