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I Wormhole question "?"

  1. Oct 10, 2016 #1
    When a wormhole opens, if each side of space is equally stretched to meet each other. Then wouldn't it be possible to only go halfway through the wormhole, close it and allow the opposite side of space you're trying to reach, "normalize" and wouldn't the space on the side you've travelled to that "normalized" return to itself faster than the speed of light allowing for faster than light speed travelling?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 10, 2016 #2

    mfb

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    That is not a good description.

    If wormholes are possible, they allow you to reach some destination faster than light would need for the regular trip (without wormhole). There is no need to close a wormhole or whatever. The wormhole itself provides a shorter connection. You never travel faster than light - you just take a shorter connection. Light going through the wormhole as well would still be faster than you.

    Also, if wormholes are possible, it is nearly impossible to avoid time travel paradoxes.
     
  4. Oct 10, 2016 #3
    What I was trying to say was, If I used my incredible technology to open a wormhole to travel to you, in which you are several thousand light years away. At the same time, you opened a worm hole allowing the worm hole to be opened faster. Then once I travel technically to you, the space you were controlling, turn my technology off, then turn off your tech. Your side of space would return to normal in half the time since your technology only had to establish the connection half way.
     
  5. Oct 10, 2016 #4

    mfb

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    That doesn't make sense.
    Also, while we do not have wormhole generators for a reliable time estimate, the typical timescale for the process would be the size divided by the speed of light - less than a microsecond for all practical purposes. There is no need to speed up a process that takes a microsecond.
     
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