Would a partner be a good idea?

  • Thread starter zKod
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In summary, someone who is interested in learning more about physics and mathematics can potentially have a great relationship with someone who has a lot of knowledge in those areas.
  • #1
zKod
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Hi, I have a question, obviously...

I am currently at high school and doing my own self-study on physics. However, I was wondering if anybody here has a "partner" they do stuff with...

I can imagine someone has a friend that they sit and discuss quantum mechanics with or how to solve some weird stuff. Maybe they even co-author some articles together (?).

Anyway, might just be me... But would it be a good idea to have a partner? Preferably someone of the same level of one self, so you can kinda help each other along and speed things up, etc (if that's even possible).

Anyway, thanks.

P.S. I might not be very clear on what it is I am looking for, so incase you're in doubt, ask and i'll try to clarify.
 
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  • #2
Of course, discussing your ideas and thoughts with someone else helps you organize them. Trying to explain physics to someone else is at the same time an excellent test to see if you really comprehend the whole picture. Let alone the fact that the person might shed some new views on the matter. It's also a lot more satisfactory to be able to share your enthousiasm with other people.

Maybe it sounds a bit lame, but you get the idea. It holds for a lot of things, not just physics.

You can also come by the forums more often, and shoot away your ideas ;)
 
  • #3
Alright, thanks... That was the answer I was hoping for :eek:
 
  • #4
Having a pair of ears that are ready to listen to you (or your nonsense sometimes) is good.
 
  • #5
Alright. In that case...

I'm looking for a mate that has limited knowledge about physics and mathematics. I'm talking inbetween pre-calculus and post-calculus... I have gotten to the point of solving differential equations, in mathematics. In physics I have a somewhat steady knowledge of physics on a college level (college as in the school you go to in your years 16-18/19).

I'm on my last year there, so I have a lot of study to do, but always open for having a partner I can talk to about what I learn. Mainly to build a social network (maybe someday build up some theoretically articles with him/her) and to learn from each other.

If you are interested, you can PM me here and i'll answer you shortly :)

P.S. If you are only pre-calculus, it's ok... I can probably help you with getting up to a higher status with the knowledge I have to spare... But you'll need to have a mindset of learning everything you can about mathematics and physics.

Interests in quantum mechanics, chemistry, biochemistry, electronics, etc is very welcomed as it broadens the scope of what we might able to do together.
 

Related to Would a partner be a good idea?

1. Would having a partner benefit my scientific research?

It depends on your specific research goals and the type of partner you choose. A partner with complementary skills or expertise can bring new perspectives and ideas to your work, but it's important to establish clear communication and expectations to ensure a successful partnership.

2. How do I find a suitable partner for my scientific work?

You can start by networking with colleagues and attending conferences or events in your field. You can also reach out to potential partners directly through email or social media. Be sure to clearly articulate your research goals and what you are looking for in a partner.

3. What are the potential drawbacks of having a partner in my research?

One potential drawback is that a partner may have different research priorities or methods, which could lead to conflicts or delays in your work. It's important to have open and honest communication with your partner and establish clear roles and expectations to help minimize these potential issues.

4. Should my partner have a similar research background as me?

Not necessarily. While having a partner with a similar background can be beneficial, it's also valuable to have diversity in perspectives and skills. This can lead to more innovative and well-rounded research.

5. How can I ensure a successful partnership in my scientific work?

Clear communication, mutual respect, and setting expectations and goals together are key to a successful partnership. Additionally, regularly checking in with each other and addressing any issues or concerns promptly can help maintain a positive and productive partnership.

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