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Would you jump off too?

  1. May 22, 2005 #1
    A person takes the elevator to the 86th floor of the Empire State Building, jumps off and freefalls all the way to the street below. He walks away uninjured. How can this be?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 22, 2005 #2

    JamesU

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    He's superman?

    OOH!! he's nugie jumping! No, freefall

    is he any sort of superhero?
     
  4. May 22, 2005 #3
    He must have reached terminal velocity at about 120 mph. A fall from 100ft isn't much different from 1000ft. That someone could walk away after a fall like that is incredible, but I've heard stories of people falling from planes and surviving. Coincidence, luck, whatever you want to call it, I wouldn't try to repeat that experiment.
     
  5. May 22, 2005 #4

    arildno

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    Dearly Missed

    The person jumping was a "she"; the "he" was the pedestrian she narrowly missed..
     
  6. May 22, 2005 #5

    dextercioby

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    Is it the same person who jumps from the 86-th storey the one who walks away unharmed?..

    Daniel.
     
  7. May 22, 2005 #6
    He could land on one of those huge balloons that are designed to be fell on from large heights.
     
  8. May 23, 2005 #7
    It was the same person who did all those things. There was no balloon to break his fall and he landed standing up so that the full force of the impact traveled up his entire body. He didn't even fall over.

    Hint. I haven't told you everything that he did
     
  9. May 23, 2005 #8

    arildno

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    He reduced g???
     
  10. May 23, 2005 #9
    Some other things he did at about that time: (don't read this if you still want to solve the puzzle)

    1. He took the elevator back down.

    2. He stood on the steps of the building.

    3. He smoked a cigarette (he's quite the daredevil).

    4. He walked over to the curb.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2005
  11. May 23, 2005 #10

    arildno

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    Blaargh, I think I've got it: He jumps up and down inside the elevator on its way down..
     
  12. May 23, 2005 #11

    honestrosewater

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    Does he travel back down to a lower floor before jumping?
    Okay, I checked. Yeah, I rock. ;)
     
  13. May 23, 2005 #12
    It is unfair that you don't tell us everything he does, in sequence. For instance, I could ask you, "A person loads a .45 JHP round into a pistol and shoots himself in the head with that pistol. He walks away uninjured." And the trick would be that he loads the round, then takes it out and replaces it with a blank.
     
  14. May 23, 2005 #13
    If that's the intended answer, the problem is based around a reference error. "Jumps off" implies that he jumps off the 86th floor, not off the curb.

    Virtually any question can be answered in that way. Try the same idea on the "nothing" puzzler:
    The first "it" in the first sentence is diamonds. The second "it" in the first sentence is diabetes. The "it" in the second sentence is poisonous mushrooms. The "it" in the third sentence, and the "answer" to the puzzle, is Barney the purple dinosaur.
     
  15. May 23, 2005 #14
    A person takes the elevator to the 86th floor of the Empire State Building.
    He gets off the elevator. He walks around. He puts a quarter into the binoculars and looks at the city. He smokes a cigarette. He chats with another tourist. He looks at his watch and frowns. He climbs over the security fence and dangles precariously over the edge.

    How am I doing so far? I know I left out a lot of things. For instance, he lit his cigarette. But I'm certain I didn't leave out anything pertinent to the solution of the puzzle.

    He jumps off the building and freefalls all the way to the street below. He walks away uninjured. How can this be?
     
  16. May 23, 2005 #15
    Oh, I know! He's juggling three balls while freefalling. :wink:
    Or... he's dreaming.
     
  17. May 23, 2005 #16
    Godzilla??? His other day job is an action performer. He does stunts like this all the time.
     
  18. May 23, 2005 #17
    You left the part where he took the elevator back down, as stated here:

    and here:

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 23, 2005
  19. May 23, 2005 #18
    It's not even a matter of leaving things out, it's just a grammatical error. When the man "jumps off," the word "off" is an adverbial phrase with "it" implied. i.e., he "jumps off it." In this case, "it" means "the 86th floor of the Empire state building." Saying it refers to something else is just a grammatical error, specifically a reference error.

    If you're going to violate grammar like that, why even bother saying he goes down to the bottom floor? Why not say that the jump referred to is a jump off a bus that the man did when he was five years old?

    This was a bad question. Most of your questions are good but this one was not good.
     
  20. May 23, 2005 #19
    A person takes the elevator to the 86th floor of the Empire State Building.
    He takes the elevator back down. He stands on the steps at the front of the building. He jumps off the building. He smokes a cigarette. He walks over to the curb and jumps into the street. He freefalls all the way to the street below. He walks away uninjured. How can this be?

    I don't get the point of a puzzle in which everything is stated explicitly. If you don't leave something out, it's not a puzzle. The point of this puzzle is no different from many others. Something is left out. The wording deliberately leads you to ignore that fact. I note that someone solved this 'unfair' puzzle. How do you explain his ability to think outside this particular box?
     
  21. May 23, 2005 #20
    A person takes the elevator to the 86th floor of the Empire State Building, jumps off the Empire State Building, freefalls all the way to the street below. He walks away from it uninjured. How can this be?

    The 'grammatical error' is gone. Now what say you?
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2005
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