WOW! This is crazy!

  • #26
Pengwuino
Gold Member
4,989
16
rachmaninoff said:
So what, are we all useless? :tongue2:
statistically, yes :)
 
  • #27
rachmaninoff
My, how we've gone off topic.
 
  • #28
695
6
rachmaninoff said:
I was actually amusing myself on a point of grammar - I apologize.

Seriously - I can't. Most people on earth are only marginally productive and will not make significant contributions to the course of humanity, like Newton or Maxwell did. It's a fault, if you will. The vast majority of society - is of no special importance to society. I proudly count myself among that number.

So what, are we all useless? :tongue2:
The world is a better place because I'm in it. That's pretty important.
 
  • #29
Pengwuino
Gold Member
4,989
16
Ugh, tribdog, just another by-product of the school system :(
 
  • #30
759
0
rachmaninoff said:
On topic, I suggest that there's nothing extraordinary whatsoever about teenagers doing advanced mathematics. They're simply not taught at the high-school level; that combined with the anti-math culture of the modern world, is the reason that students like Viscardi are so few. There's no inherent reason that 16-year olds can't be fluent in PDEs and such - just look at some of the former USSR schools, look at the texts they used at the secondary-school level! No doubt he's extremely smart; but if everyone were thrown into academia at a very young age (soviet-style), there'd be thousands like him.
Indeed there would be (an opinion I held for a long time...and still do).

You also introduced two systems of public education here (no doubt the Soviet structure is more rigorous :smile:..and in my opinion, more preferable than the American educational approach, one of the reasons being a stronger sense of personal discipline towards academia).

But that's where I believe the homeschooling "edge" comes in towards academic matters; parents can model after the Soviet approach, as well as certain other approaches, but nonetheless homeschooling is individualized (as compared to public education, be it Soviet, American, Chinese,..etc). Although it essentially places more responsibility and work in the hands of parents---a large part the greater "risk" factor I mentioned earlier---the potential academic growth (in my opinion) is worth the time, effort, and challenge.

rachmaninoff said:
Sorry if I ramble.
I think I ramble quite more here :frown: :frown:
(whenever I do post in GD)

Edit:
*And to rachmaninoff and Pengwuino:
:rofl: :rofl:
(hey, why not?)
 
Last edited:
  • #31
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
18,903
2,205
rachmaninoff said:
I've asked this already, does anyone know if he's published a paper on this subject, or if this is some sort of pre-emptive scholarship? It's frustrating that for all the publicity he's getting, I can't look at his actual achievement for myself. His presentation was titled, "On the Solution of the Dirichlet Problem with Rational Boundary Data", that's all I've found.
Perhaps it will be published in the Journal. Oftern the journals which I read have a provision that the work is new and unpublished.

I am not sure what the time frame is for releasing the papers or projects of the Siemens-Westinghouse Science Competition, but it the works must be published or available at the competition. Afterall, the works have to be reviewed. One could contact the students advsior in the math department at UCSD.

Perhaps in time, the work will be published.
 
  • #32
JasonRox
Homework Helper
Gold Member
2,314
3
Yeah, you have to wait.

You still have the review process, or atleast wait for the next journal to come out.

Patience.
 

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