Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Homework Help: X² = 0

  1. Mar 13, 2006 #1
    I was just wondering how to solve the following equation. x² = 0. I am new to algebra and am just unsure as how to solve this.

    I have come to the conclusion that the answer is x = 0 or x = -0

    Is there any working out needed to be done? This is for homework :)

    Kind regards

    lakitu
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 13, 2006 #2

    0rthodontist

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    You could take the square root of both sides. -0 is the same as 0.
     
  4. Mar 13, 2006 #3

    HallsofIvy

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Same way you would solve an equation of the form x2= a for any non-negative a: take the square root of both sides: [itex]x= \pm\sqrt{a}[/itex].

    [itex]x= \pm 0[/itex] but since -0= 0, there is only the solution x= 0.
     
  5. Mar 13, 2006 #4

    BobG

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    It's just zero (there's no such thing as positive zero or negative zero).
     
  6. Mar 13, 2006 #5

    Lisa!

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    what's the point in solving such a equation? At first I though I was missing some point.(I guess OP was feeling the same way) :redface:
     
  7. Mar 13, 2006 #6
    yeah I thought it was odd to being that there is no such thing as -0 or +0 here is the question he gave me.

    Solve the equation
    x² = 0
    x = ? or x = ?
     
  8. Mar 13, 2006 #7
    Well I've been doing algebra for several chool years and the only way I could think that he would expect you to find x would be to put x = 0. You could also use fractions, but I don't think he expects youto know that yet.
     
  9. Mar 13, 2006 #8

    chroot

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Fractions, wScott? There are no fractional roots. There is only one (degenerate) solution of this polynomial, x=0.

    You can factor x^2 = 0 as (x + 0)(x + 0) = 0.

    - Warren
     
  10. Mar 13, 2006 #9

    Hurkyl

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Sure there is. They're both equal to 0.
     
  11. Mar 14, 2006 #10

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    What if "x" is an operator on some linear space...? You know, just because d^{2}=0 for the exterior differential, it doesn't mean that d=0...Such operators are called "nilpotent of degree "n" if d^{n}=0 on some linear space...

    Daniel.
     
  12. Mar 14, 2006 #11

    arildno

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    Dearly Missed

    Very deep precalculus maths that, dexter.
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook