Y=f(x) to z=f(x,y) ? Help

  • #1
y=f(x) to z=f(x,y) ???? Help

My question is :


when z=f(x,y) is written down ...

it's assume that we're working in the cartesian plane with z on the

vertical axis, x and y on the horizontal right?


And they're not going to mix that around on me unless otherwise

stated?


So I can associate the variables x and y and z in my head --as

meaning the x y and z coordinate respectively ...and theyren not

going to have x be the 'y' coordinate on the graph and x be the 'z'

coordinate....???




z=f(x,y) is the y=f(x) of 2 variables?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Defennder
Homework Helper
2,591
5


My question is :

when z=f(x,y) is written down ...

it's assume that we're working in the cartesian plane with z on the

vertical axis, x and y on the horizontal right?
Yes, that's usually how it's pictured.

And they're not going to mix that around on me unless otherwise

stated?

So I can associate the variables x and y and z in my head --as

meaning the x y and z coordinate respectively ...and theyren not

going to have x be the 'y' coordinate on the graph and x be the 'z'

coordinate....???
If it's expressed in the form z=f(x,y), you can think of z graph as being height function of the solid.

z=f(x,y) is the y=f(x) of 2 variables?
Yes.
 

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