Yet another book recommendation request

  • Thread starter Spectre5
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  • #1
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Hey,

I am looking for some recommendations on books covering partial differential equations and another one on complex analysis. I don't have a lot of extra money, so I am kind of hoping that someone has experience with some of the Dover books, and could possible recommend any of them? I have looked at many of them on amazon.com, but I simply have no idea which ones are "better" or "worse".


I am very interesting in both the theory and applications of partial differential equations and complex analysis.


Currently, I do have:
An Introduction to Partial Differential Equations by Matthew P Coleman
and
Fundamentals of Complex Analysis by E. B. Saff and A. D. Snider

(these are the books I have from my courses in them)


Thanks for any recommendations!

-Scott

PS:
The book I have on Partial Differential Equations is a first edition book and I have found many mistakes throughout the book (mistakes within the book as well as incorrect answers to selected problems).
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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No suggestions?
 
  • #3
Tom Mattson
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OK, here goes:

PDE's It's not cheap, but I really like it:https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0471548685/qid=1127871053/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/104-3782015-1303906?v=glance&s=books, by W. Strauss. I took a course from it, and it is about as friendly an introduction as possible, considering the subject.

Complex Variables I recommend the Schaum's Outline https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0070602301/qid=1127871159/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-3782015-1303906?v=glance&s=books, by M. Spiegel.
 
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  • #4
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Thank you for the suggestions. I will look into those. In that pde book, does it teach pde's from the complex perspective or trigonometric?

i.e. My pde book now avoids as many uses of complex variables as possible and converts everything to sin/cos and sinh/cosh instead of complex exponentials. I would like to get a pde book that teaches the complex approach to pde's.

Which method does that book use?

thanks

-Scott
 
  • #5
Tom Mattson
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Spectre5 said:
Which method does that book use?
It focuses on the trigonometric perspective.
 

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