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  1. May 11, 2005 #1
    How you learn quantum physics I don't know. The math is complicated. I want to know a really hard equation that involves quantum physics and is really hard to solve. A really confusing looking one. I don't know calculus yet, but I will someday.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 11, 2005 #2
    look up the shrodinger equation
     
  4. May 11, 2005 #3
    QM is more difficult conceptually then it is mathematically. If you want to do hard core math stuff as well, try topological field theory or string theory.

    regards
    marlon
     
  5. May 11, 2005 #4

    chroot

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    There's no sense in learning "a really hard equation" in vacuo, because it really won't mean anything to you. You should just work on your math skills. You don't need much beyond linear algebra and single-variable calculus to understand the bulk of QM, and most scientific or technical degree programs include those classes in the first couple of years.

    - Warren
     
  6. May 11, 2005 #5
    Warren is correct,

    QM is not that hard mathematically and your university will make sure that you have completed the necessary calculus/algebra courses before you embark your actual QM-journey...Don't worry about the math, worry about the "counter-intuitive" nature of QM. It really proves our intuition is a bad thing to follow when doing science.

    regards
    marlon
     
  7. May 11, 2005 #6
    The equations aren't the hard stuff. But you have to understand this equation not in sense of their derivation but in sense of their meaning how they describe the nature.
     
  8. May 11, 2005 #7
    so where can i learn online, FREE
     
  9. May 11, 2005 #8

    Tom Mattson

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  10. May 11, 2005 #9

    dextercioby

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    Though it's better if you went to the library and get Morse & Feshbach.It's all one needs.

    Daniel.
     
  11. May 11, 2005 #10

    Tom Mattson

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    Are you trying to say that Morse and Feshbach requires no prerequisites? :confused:
     
  12. May 11, 2005 #11

    dextercioby

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    Nope,but i still think that some chapers of that book are highly useful before jumping to Schrödinger and functional analysis...


    Daniel.
     
  13. May 11, 2005 #12

    jma2001

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    You're talking about _Methods of Theoretical Physics_? OK, but I can't find a copy of that book for less than $200.00 (!). There was a rumor that the publisher was working on a paperback set, is that still happening?
     
  14. May 11, 2005 #13

    dextercioby

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    Of course i meant that book.I know it's expensive,even if it was written in 1953 (!),but borrowing from the library is supposed to be free.

    Daniel.
     
  15. May 11, 2005 #14
    You can get Methods of Classical and Quantum Physics by Byron and Fuller for $9 used. It's a Dover publication. Good book too.

    However, you need to learn calculus first.
     
  16. May 11, 2005 #15

    dextercioby

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    I dunno about that one,i don't have it,but i was giving him the best there is.I'm sure that all book recomandations of methods of mathematical phsyics require some linear algebra & calculus as prerequisites.

    Daniel.
     
  17. May 12, 2005 #16
    wow, such a very great resources. thx
     
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