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Young pregnancy

  1. May 2, 2005 #1

    Pengwuino

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    Ok so heres the situation, some 13 year old gets pregnant and wants to have an abortion. Someone shoots this statement at me " Are you also aware that at 13, her body is VERY likely not physically equipped to be able to bring up the baby, and it will be very difficult for it, and her, to survive."

    Now im wondering something. If her body was 'advanced' enough to have actually create a baby, is there any connection to her body's ability to have the baby survive for the 9 months and then give birth? Seems like your body wouldnt allow something to happen that it wasnt capable of supporting the consequences of it.
     
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  3. May 2, 2005 #2

    Monique

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    The key is that hormones induce fertility. Within the western world girls are exposed to a lot of hormones, they also produce a lot themselves when they are overweight. Especially in the US girls reach fertility at a very young age: on average they have their menarchy (their period) at age 11, in western Europe that is at age 13, in Japan it is age 17.

    Having menarchy and thus releasing an egg does not mean the body is able to accomodate pregnancy, the body of the girl is still growing: think about the pelvis for instance.
    I think this accelerated development is very unnatural.
     
  4. May 2, 2005 #3

    DaveC426913

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    "Seems like your body wouldnt allow something to happen that it wasnt capable of supporting the consequences of it."

    Nope. Just not true. If it were, we wouldn't have cancer, impacted wisdom teeth, fallen arches, slipped-discs or a million other non-disease-related problems.
     
  5. May 2, 2005 #4

    Monique

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    He means some kind of feedback mechanism that would be in place to prevent pregancy when the body is not fully developed. Apparently there isn't one, or is taken down in our modern society.
     
  6. May 2, 2005 #5

    DaveC426913

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    (well, hardly has to do with our modern society. This happens all the time in less developed societies.)


    How many weeks is she? Any idea?

    The mechanism that minimizes childbirth when the body is not adequately developed is the same as the mechanism for any other problem: spontaneous miscarriage. We don't know the various mechanisms that cause it, but the idea, in relation to your question is, the body doesn't prevent pregancy, it just deals with it "retroactively", as it were.

    Many people don't know this, but women get pregnant all the time and lose them spontaneously without even knowing it. Some studies suggest that as many as 40% of pregancies and losses occur without the mother ever knowing it. Again, nature's way.



    I can get you more details to your question if you are interested.
     
  7. May 2, 2005 #6
    Up untill the 1920's(40's in southern states} if you were not married and haveing children by the time you were 14-16, you were considered faulity. And by 17-18, you were a old maid.
    Age has little to do with the birthing of a child, not a great risk factor unless they are under 10, or so underdeveloped there pelvic wall can't support the weight.
     
  8. May 2, 2005 #7

    Monique

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    Are there any figures about miscarriages in teens?
     
  9. May 2, 2005 #8

    DaveC426913

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    Since my expert appears to have gone home for the day, I'm committing a sin and Googling for it.

    This site says 1/3 end in spontaneous miscarriage.



    My expert (my wife is assistant to a high-risk ObGyn, she is also an antepartum teacher. You got questions, she got answers) says this about teen pregnancy:

    There is a greater risk for loss, preterm labour and stillbirth associated with very young women who get pregnant. However as far as that goes it would be beneficial to have this type of pregnancy monitored either by a high risk OB who specializes in children, or an obstetrician who understands the unique needs of the teenager. These needs are mostly nutrition and lifestyle related, although there can also be some hormonal issues if the girl is still menstruating irregularly at the time of conception.

    The hormonal issues might not be as great as the lifestyle issues. A thirteen year old girl that is engaging in intercouse is also not well supervised, and very likely to engage in other risky behaviours.

    (That being said,) nature favours a successful outcome. Pregnancy even in a young female is more likely to occur if the situation is right. If the concern is regarding lactation, then the issues of nutrition and lifestyle would again play the biggest part is determining success or failure. Adequate support would be the key.



    But I (and she) can't stress this enough:
    Don't take any advice from the internet when it comes to health. Nothing said here should be taken without confirmation.
    This girl needs to be seen by her doctor.
     
  10. May 2, 2005 #9

    Moonbear

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    Pregnancy in young teens is considered to be high risk. It doesn't mean they won't be able to have a healthy child, but it means they are at higher risk of problems and should get good prenatal care if they plan to carry the pregnancy. Of course, this is also the same group that is at high risk because they conceal their pregnancy or are engaged in other high risk behaviors (smoking, drugs, alcohol, violence) and don't get the adequate prenatal care they very much need. Low birthweight babies are common among those age groups, but I don't know if that's really their age or inadequate nutrition or due to other risk factors.

    There are other risk factors after birth...the obvious being the lack of a mature parent who is competent to make decisions for the care and upbringing of that baby. Afterall, if she became pregnant at 13, she probably doesn't have the best role model of parenting available to her to have learned from.

    So, as DaveC mentioned, she should be seen by a physician, and soon! If she has an abortion, she should receive follow-up care, be tested for STDs, taught about birth control, and counseled about her high risk behaviors. If she chooses not to get an abortion, then she needs to be monitored by an OB/GYN who can give that baby the best chance to enter the world healthy, and for the 13 year old to be healthy as well.

    Modern medicine makes those high risk pregnancies a lot less risky, but only if she gets that medical attention.
     
  11. May 2, 2005 #10

    DaveC426913

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    Uh, yeah, what Moonbear said.

    With one exception:
    "Afterall, if she became pregnant at 13, she probably doesn't have the best role model of parenting available to her to have learned from."
    This is quite a fallacious presumption.
     
  12. May 2, 2005 #11

    Moonbear

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    Oops, sorry, I let some unfounded opinion slip in there. Thanks for calling me on it. :redface:
     
  13. May 2, 2005 #12

    Astronuc

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    Actually, Moonbear's statement seems reasonable. I have yet to hear of a case where a 12 - 16 yr old got pregnant, and the child had a great parenting role model, especially the cases involving 12-14 yr olds.

    When I lived in Texas, there was quite often a story of a 12 or 13 yr old being pregnant, and without exception, all the situations reflected poor parenting.

    At the moment there is a relevant case in Florida involving a 13 yr old girl who is a ward of the state. She wants an abortion, but the state says no.
    DCF out to block 13-year-old's abortion
     
  14. May 2, 2005 #13
    Coming to conclusions on heritability without data from adoption studies

    That does not seem to have been contested. DaveC said it was a fallacious presumption.



    Adoption studies might have data on this.



    Involved is not the same as reflected. As well as providing a home environment, parents provide biological heritage. This is why adoption studies are performed. Adoption studies, with and without twins, allow researchers to independently control environment and genetic endowment.
     
  15. May 2, 2005 #14

    Pengwuino

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    Yah this is what someone on another forum is talking about but the guy (some 14 year old) says that " Are you also aware that at 13, her body is VERY likely not physically equipped to be able to bring up the baby, and it will be very difficult for it, and her, to survive."

    Now isnt this inaccurate seeing as how the body might just miscarriage?
     
  16. May 3, 2005 #15

    Astronuc

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    Just miscarry, when? What if the child goes to full term - delivery? Presumably, the doctors would perform a Ceasarian-section, if necessary. And what about the new-born baby?

    The question - is this 13 yr old girl at risk?

    This issue seems to come down to whether or not a teenage girl has a right to an abortion, and whether the 'state' can force a teenage girl to go to term and bear a child. However, I do not wish to address 'abortion right' vs 'right to life'.

    And anyway, who got her pregnant? There is an 'irresponsible' male (actually a lot of them) out there! :grumpy: :mad:

    The other issue is that the state (Florida) agency has failed miserably to ensure the welfare of this child.
     
  17. May 3, 2005 #16

    DaveC426913

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    Anecdotal. By far, the least valuable type of evidence.

    The ultimate point here, is that it is folly to assume a 13 year-old pregnant girl probably came from parents who are poor role-models. This ignores all the girls who, for example, have good parents and make dumb mistakes.
     
  18. May 3, 2005 #17

    Pengwuino

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    Well i dunno if its the issue or not, but all i want to know is if theres this huge risk that this kid on this other forum is talken about
     
  19. May 3, 2005 #18

    DaveC426913

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    Agreed. This thread is not about rights at all. Hope it doesn't get hijacked.

    According to my expert, the risks are mostly avoidable i.e. they are not really physiological risk factors; proper education and medical attention is what she needs. Nonetheless, there is a higher risk of complication, yes, and she should be seen by a competent physician familiar with teen pregnancy.

    Again, no one should ever take action on any advice about health from the internet (or any other unqualified source), no matter what credentials they offer. She needs to have competent medical supervision that can examine her specific case. If she gets that, she'll be fine.

    If you are concerned, the only question you need to ask is 'Is she being seen by her doctor?'
     
  20. May 4, 2005 #19

    Moonbear

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    There is no way to know in any individual case what her risk will be without a proper medical exam. A married, 25 year-old woman could turn out to have a high risk pregnancy as well, even though she's not in a high risk group, just due to her individual health. So, while I could say that, as a group, younger teens have a higher incidence or risk of complications in pregnancy and childbirth, it doesn't mean this one will be one of those.

    Beyond the physical risks, there are also the psychological risks. Though, once a 13-yr old is pregnant, all the options come with some difficult psychological issues. Choosing abortion can be difficult as can doubt about that choice later in life. Choosing to give up a baby for adoption can be difficult, wondering if the baby is really in a good home and having a good life. And keeping the baby and struggling to be a 13-yr old mom raising a baby when you're still growing up yourself is stressful.
     
  21. May 4, 2005 #20

    Moonbear

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    Well, I was thinking more along the lines that a 13 yr old pregnant due to rape or incest would not be the fault of bad parenting (unless the incest was from her father). Though, in this particular case, the girl is a ward of the state, so absent parents are a given.

    Astronuc is also certainly correct that somewhere out there is a boy/man who got that 13 yr-old pregnant and is not there with her to share responsibility for their actions. I feel sorry for her; she has not only wound up pregnant at such a young age, but is going through the ordeal alone, without a loving family to support her, and being dragged into court to decide whether to abort or carry the pregnancy. If they decide for her that she will carry the pregnancy, then unlike some situations where a young teen lives with her parents who can help her raise the baby, this baby will probably be taken away from her at birth, whatever her wishes - if she isn't deemed mature enough to decide for herself to abort or carry the pregnancy, then how could they deem her mature enough to care for and raise a baby? She's not even old enough to support herself let alone support herself plus a baby.
     
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