Youngs and single slit experiments

In summary, the conversation includes two questions related to experiments in physics. The first question is about Young's double slit experiment and the relationship between slit separation and interference fringes. The second question is about single slit diffraction and the width of the central maximum on a screen. The expert responds with a confirmation that the formula used is correct for the first question, and a suggestion to look at the formula for the minima and try again for the second question.
  • #1

Dx

Hiya!

I have questions that i am hoping someone can confirm my answers to, please.

1) In youngs double split experiment, if the separation between the slits decreased wouldn't the distance increase between the interference fringes? I say yes, i used this formula to derive my conclusion. sin[the]= m[lamb] / d. am i correct?

2) In a single slit diffraction experiment, if the width of the slit increases wouldn't the width of the central maximum on a screen increase as well? Is this true, from the pics and what I've read i believe it is but wanted a knowledgeable opinoin on this question
 
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  • #2
Dx,

Homework problems go in the Homework Help forum, OK? These questions ain't theoretical physics.

Originally posted by Dx
1) In youngs double split experiment, if the separation between the slits decreased wouldn't the distance increase between the interference fringes? I say yes, i used this formula to derive my conclusion. sin[the]= m[lamb] / d. am i correct?

Yes.

2) In a single slit diffraction experiment, if the width of the slit increases wouldn't the width of the central maximum on a screen increase as well? Is this true, from the pics and what I've read i believe it is but wanted a knowledgeable opinoin on this question

Look at the formula for the minima and try again.
 
  • #3
.

Hi there!

1) Yes, you are correct. In Young's double slit experiment, if the distance between the slits decreases, the distance between the interference fringes will increase. This can be seen from the formula you used, which relates the distance between the slits (d) to the wavelength of light (λ) and the angle of diffraction (θ). As the separation between the slits decreases, the angle of diffraction increases, resulting in a larger distance between the interference fringes.

2) You are also correct in your understanding of the single slit diffraction experiment. As the width of the slit increases, the width of the central maximum on a screen will also increase. This is because the wider slit allows for more diffraction of light, resulting in a broader central maximum. This can be observed from the diffraction pattern on a screen, where the central maximum will appear wider with a wider slit.

I hope this helps clarify your understanding of these experiments. Keep up the good work!
 

1. What is a Young's experiment?

A Young's experiment is an optical interference experiment first conducted by Thomas Young in the early 1800s. It involves shining a single light source through two narrow slits and observing the resulting interference pattern on a screen.

2. How does a Young's experiment demonstrate the wave nature of light?

The interference pattern observed in a Young's experiment is caused by the superposition of two sets of waves from the two slits. This pattern is only possible if light behaves as a wave, with properties such as diffraction and interference.

3. What is a single slit experiment?

A single slit experiment is similar to a Young's experiment, but with only one slit instead of two. It also demonstrates the wave nature of light, but the resulting interference pattern is less distinct compared to the pattern in a Young's experiment.

4. How does the width of the slits affect the interference pattern in a Young's experiment?

The width of the slits determines the distance between the bright and dark fringes in the interference pattern. Wider slits will result in a wider spacing between fringes, while narrower slits will result in a smaller spacing between fringes.

5. Can a Young's experiment be performed with other types of waves?

Yes, a Young's experiment can also be performed with other types of waves, such as sound waves or water waves. These experiments also demonstrate the wave nature of these types of waves and produce similar interference patterns.

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