Your favorite political rival

turbo
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turbo, are you saying that the legislature could nullify the 1st amendment?
Do you need that straw-man? The Congress can legislate to restrict individual rights to INDIVIDUALS, and they should. There is no reason to "nullify" the 1st amendment. There is also no reason to extend that right to artificial conglomerations of investors and their managers. The SC recently did so, legislating from the bench and applying a drastically-broad interpretation of what constitutes an "individual". If you want the US to fall into outright facism, please support that decision. If you want the US to be a representative democracy with reasonable limits on corporations, you might want to reconsider your views.
 
calculusrocks
Do you need that straw-man? The Congress can legislate to restrict individual rights to INDIVIDUALS, and they should. There is no reason to "nullify" the 1st amendment. There is also no reason to extend that right to artificial conglomerations of investors and their managers. The SC recently did so, legislating from the bench and applying a drastically-broad interpretation of what constitutes an "individual". If you want the US to fall into outright facism, please support that decision. If you want the US to be a representative democracy with reasonable limits on corporations, you might want to reconsider your views.
I dislike being lured into this conversation, because you were just so off topic. It may be better if you just start another thread on why the Supreme Court condoned fascism in its recent decision, and why if I don't agree with you, then I'm plain ignorant.
 
calculusrocks
lisab
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I knew if I thought long enough about it, I'd think of one!

I'm a big fan of Sam Reed, the http://www.sos.wa.gov/Default.aspx" [Broken]. He's a Republican whom I see as eminently fair and balanced. I vote for him every chance I get.
 
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mheslep
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Great idea for a thread Ivan, if people will stick to the point:

Senators:
Webb (Va). He's a serious man, no BS.
Inouye (Ha)
Wyden (Or)
Lieberman (Conn-I)

Administration:
Gates (Defence)
Arne Duncan (Ed)
 
Ivan Seeking
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Senators:
Webb (Va). He's a serious man, no BS.
No doubt about it. When I wrote Obama, right after he won the Iowa primary, I indicated my support for Webb as VP. Of course, Webb used to be a Republican.

Inouye (Ha)
Wyden (Or)
Very interesting. Could you elaborate a bit. I am curious about your opinion of Wyden in particular [I live in Oregon]

Gates (Defence)
Gates is top-notch but I am surprised that you see him as a political rival. I could have listed him as well.
 
Char. Limit
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turbo, are you saying that the legislature could nullify the 1st amendment?
I don't want to get off-topic, so I'd appreciate it if you put your reply in a visitor message on my profile (but you don't have to), but Congress can repeal amendments... by passing other amendments.

The 21st Amendment repealed the 18th, so there is even a precedent for doing so.
 
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This is a good question, but sad at the same time.

I'm right of center, conservative--and as I was trying to think of a leftist or liberal that I respect--I couldn't think of a single one. If he counts, I could put Bill Clinton on the list but he wasn't a doctrinaire liberal. And Joe Lieberman is another good candidate. Although I may disagree with him on many things, I can trust him to put the country's best interest first.

Lani Davis and Bill Richardson would be better choices. Davis was absolutely willing to allow affordable health choices sans govt. And Richardson supports tax cuts--a very pragmatic fellow.

As you could see from my list, most are centrist--that's I said it was sad. I'm unable to take leftists seriously.
 
lisab
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I know what you mean, planck. I had to think a long, long time before I could think of someone.

Well, we all know the political culture in the US is terribly dysfunctional. Politicians have to put their party's needs ahead of the country's, or they will get no financial support for their next election. So sad.

The guy I mentioned, Sam Reed, has had many well-publicized run-ins with his party, the Republicans, for not toeing the party line. Yet he is clearly to the right of center. Fortunately he has strong support from the voters and can get along without much $ from his party.
 
mheslep
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Very interesting. Could you elaborate a bit. I am curious about your opinion of Wyden in particular [I live in Oregon]
I liked the Wyden-Bennet health bill, a truly bipartisan effort for a bill that in my view would have been much better than the current law despite some flaws. He must have received a great deal of criticism from his own public-option side for this bill.

Inouye I've seen interviewed a number of times. Edit as I recall more: He's a stone cold WWII war hero, Medal of Honor reciepient, who absolutely loves America, who's almost an exact contemporary of Bob Dole and has overcome similar disabilities to get where he is that would have laid many others flat. He seems to avoid most of the political hyperbole.
http://www.pbs.org/thewar/detail_5339.htm
http://www.pbs.org/thewar/detail_5384.htm


Gates is top-notch but I am surprised that you see him as a political rival. I could have listed him as well.
I don't know about rival. He's a member of the President's cabinet, so I expected that qualified him for the thread, and I wanted to point out a couple who I admire in the administration, given my intense criticism of many of the rest.
 
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mheslep
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BTW, for and Dems who believe it's a vain exercise to find class in the other camp, try this:
http://politicalwire.com/archives/2009/12/18/an_unlikely_friendship.html [Broken]
 
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Ivan Seeking
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I don't know about rival. He's a member of the President's cabinet, so I expected that qualified him for the thread, and I wanted to point out a couple who I admire in the administration, given my intense criticism of many of the rest.
The sad thing about Gates is that he desperately wants to get out - he hates the job! - but he knows he is needed. Nothing desparaging to say about Obama at all, the job is just terribly difficult professionally as well as personally and emotionally. I suspect the reason that we both like Gates is what causes him so much personal grief: He is deadly serious about what he does.
 
mheslep
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The sad thing about Gates is that he desperately wants to get out - he hates the job! - but he knows he is needed. Nothing desparaging to say about Obama at all, the job is just terribly difficult professionally as well as personally and emotionally. I suspect the reason that we both like Gates is what causes him so much personal grief: He is deadly serious about what he does.
I had not heard he wanted to leave, though I expect nobody wants that job long with one and half wars ongoing.
 
Ivan Seeking
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Of those on the opposite side of the aisle, or those who generally oppose/support legislation that you support/oppose, whom do you respect the most, and why?

This idea came to mind as I watched John Boehner - Republican Congressman and minority leader - on television, this morning. A little over a year ago, back when I saw his impassioned plea to Congress in support of the bank bailout, I did a complete 180 when it comes to my perception of Boehner. I know that it took the highest degree of dedication to the common good, to abandon his ideology and support the bailout bill. While Boehner and I generally disagree, it is clear to me that, right or wrong, he is fighting the good fight. I have to respect that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVOS1CC6V5I
Congratulations to our presumed new Speaker of the House.
 
lisab
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Congratulations to our presumed new Speaker of the House.
Meh.

Last night as he took the podium, I though oh I'm going to go to bed before the waterworks start. Sure enough, by the time I got the coffee ready to go for the morning, he was bawling.

But if getting the House is what it takes for the Reps to stop being mulish and start actually governing, so be it. I'll give them a couple years and make my judgement then.
 
Ivan Seeking
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Meh.

Last night as he took the podium, I though oh I'm going to go to bed before the waterworks start. Sure enough, by the time I got the coffee ready to go for the morning, he was bawling.

But if getting the House is what it takes for the Reps to stop being mulish and start actually governing, so be it. I'll give them a couple years and make my judgement then.
He did stand up for the country and didn't placate the extremists, when it counted. And yes, he does cry a lot!!! It is pretty clear that he also drinks a lot. I'm pretty sure I've seen him drunk when interviewed on the news.

This I think will be the real test. Will he focus on legislation, or will he sell out and start issuing subpoenas?

Or, will he posture and focus on legislation that has no hope of passage in the Senate?
 
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turbo
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Boehner has already said in recent remarks that the House would be more open and transparent under GOP leadership, but that doesn't mean it would be bi-partisan. It may be time for pay-back against perceived slights.
 
Char. Limit
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It's payback time!

Or is it?

I think Boehner will respect the wishes of the American people and work forward, not for payback.
 
lisab
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It's payback time!

Or is it?

I think Boehner will respect the wishes of the American people and work forward, not for payback.
Well, we can all hope o:)
 
BobG
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Mine would be Joe Biden. One of the few East (or West) coast Dems I like.

I could include Ken Salazar, Bill Richardson, Ben Nelson, but I've never had much problem with Midwestern-Western Dems.
 
turbo
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I had always had a fondness for William F. Buckley's ideas. My father was not really happy when I supported Goldwater, et al starting back in the '60s since his family had always been the working poor. By the time the neo-cons got a strangle-hold on the GOP, I refused to register as a Republican and went Independent and only voted on candidates and issues, not parties, and the old man calmed down a bit. Still, until Buckley died, I found more wisdom and thought in his positions than those of "commentators" and "pundits" that have gotten heavy press for the last couple of decades. In this case, Buckley was at no time a political rival, so maybe I can't sneak him in here, but I've got to say that Greenspan, Bernanke, Geithner, and other insiders who spend their careers transferring more and more wealth to the wealthy have earned my undying contempt.
 
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Of those on the opposite side of the aisle, or those who generally oppose/support legislation that you support/oppose, whom do you respect the most, and why?
Even though he's a Democrat (and I'm not), I'd have to say John Glenn. Too bad hasn't been in office since 1999...
 

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