Your fight against stress

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  • #1
radou
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I was just wondering, what do you people do to reduce stress/nervousness? I mean, the stress is a standard part of life, some experience more of it, and some less, but I guess we all tend to get nervous often when we should not. (I know this may sound like an uninspired article from a trash trivia magazine, but I can't help it.)

I use to take walks, which relaxes me and keeps me focued on things I have to do and somehow clears my thoughts.

In general, I believe people who have any kind of routine physical occupation (like sport, primarily) tend to handle stress easier, since our bodies aren't created to sit in front of computers and work all day long.

Anyway, in conclusion, it's great to have some type of 'exhaustion-vent', so I'm interested to hear what yours are. :smile:
 

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  • #2
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Mine changes as what I do changes. Over the summer I didn't have a job and didn't work out all the time or anything. I was pretty active, but nothing extreme. What I did then was go on walks.

I now have a job in which I often do physical activity and stay standing all day. To relax and get rid of stress I either go for a drive or sit down and listen to music in the dark.

Hanging out with certain friends has always worked. This seems to be especially true with friends who are girls...
 
  • #3
radou
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Hanging out with certain friends has always worked. This seems to be especially true with friends who are girls...

True, there are people who simply can't make you nervous.

Btw, same here, driving is okay, too.
 
  • #4
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True, there are people who simply can't make you nervous.

Yeah, these are the people that when you talk to them, you forget about the rest of the world. Over the span of a few hours you can forget that other people even exist and are going about their day around you.
 
  • #5
radou
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Yeah, these are the people that when you talk to them, you forget about the rest of the world. Over the span of a few hours you can forget that other people even exist and are going about their day around you.

Then again, such people are rare. So, the more of them you know, the better. Although, it is, of course, completely relative. To someone else they can be the most annoying people in the world. :smile:
 
  • #6
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What do you mean by stress?
 
  • #7
radou
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  • #8
Evo
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Stress is killing me. I do have someone that listens to me whine every night, so that's a big stress reducer. Comimg here and talking to good people like you reduces stress.

Petting my cat and dog reduces stress. :smile:
 
  • #9
radou
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Stress is killing me. I do have someone that listens to me whine every night, so that's a big stress reducer.

Well, that's a great thing. I bet there are lots of people who only can whine to themselves, which leads to bad things in the end.

Comimg here and talking to good people like you reduces stress.

Same here, again. :smile:
 
  • #10
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I punch the crap out of my heavy bag at my house for about 1 hour. Man is that a good work out. Every other day I also run 5 miles. Everday I usually lift weights for a little bit too. I also like to play video games.
 
  • #11
radou
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I punch the crap out of my heavy bag at my house for about 1 hour. Man is that a good work out. Every other day I also run 5 miles. Everday I usually lift weights for a little bit too. I also like to play video games.

I always wanted to have a punching bag, but it's one of those things you want all the time but never actually purchase.

Running/jogging rules. But you have to have the will to keep it up. I used to do some jogging in some time intervals (since my appartment is near the city park), but never made it frequent enough to consider it as a relaxing activity.
 
  • #12
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Nervousness, anxiety, etc. The common things.

Oh, I dont get those things.
 
  • #13
Moonbear
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Why would you want to get rid of stress?! It's what makes life exciting and keeps people productive. :biggrin: I'd never get anything accomplished if it weren't for the stress of deadlines looming. :rofl: Without stress, life would be boring.

If you react negatively to stress to the point where it's harmful (feeling sick, high blood pressure, etc), and you can't otherwise convince yourself that things will manage to get done to relax more, then the only way to rid yourself of the stress is to rid yourself of the stressor. Get the job done that's looming, rearrange your schedule to fit things in better or eliminate things that are consuming too much time, ask for help on things that are too much to do on your own, etc. The best way to manage stress is to delegate the tasks that are causing your stress to others. :biggrin: If you are the one everyone is delegating to, then you could look forward to the day when you move up and can delegate to others. :tongue:
 
  • #14
russ_watters
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To me there is a difference between pressure and stress, just as a pat on the head is different from a slap across the face. Pressure (as in a deadline) motivates you to focus, stress reduces productivity because you spend time/energy worrying about the deadline instead of doing the work.

Maybe its just a definition thing - to me, those harmful effects you listed are what stress is.
 
  • #15
russ_watters
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...according to the dictionary:
7. Physiology. a specific response by the body to a stimulus, as fear or pain, that disturbs or interferes with the normal physiological equilibrium of an organism.
8. physical, mental, or emotional strain or tension: Worry over his job and his wife's health put him under a great stress.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/stress

It seems to me then that stress is, by definition, a negative thing, though definition #8 is a little vague about it.

Anyway, stress makes me physically and emotionally tired. I sleep when I'm feeling stressed, which while better than drinking or doing drugs, but can be destructive, especially if it is a deadline that is causing the stress.
 
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  • #16
Moonbear
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To me there is a difference between pressure and stress, just as a pat on the head is different from a slap across the face. Pressure (as in a deadline) motivates you to focus, stress reduces productivity because you spend time/energy worrying about the deadline instead of doing the work.

Maybe its just a definition thing - to me, those harmful effects you listed are what stress is.

I just take that all as different degrees of the same thing. I was almost going to answer Cyrus' question of what stress is by defining it as being under pressure. :biggrin: But, don't worry, even those who study "stress" can't always agree upon their definitions.

What always amazes me is how two people can be given equal responsibilities and pressures, and one will find the challenge invigorating and immediately buckle down to do it, and the other will be overwhelmed and panicking over all the work they have to do. And, of course, there are also people who you want to tell, "If you spent as much time doing the work as you spend complaining about the work, it would be done by now."
 
  • #17
Moonbear
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It seems to me then that stress is, by definition, a negative thing, though definition #8 is a little vague about it.

You posted that while I was still working on the other reply.

The bad side of "stress" is really more distress, or to overreact, or fail to adapt after a brief stressful event. It's basically the "flight or fight" physiological response gone haywire. In a physiological context, this reaction is a good thing if you're being attacked and your life is in danger, but if you're having the same reaction to something mild, like a deadline for paperwork, then it's a bad thing.
 
  • #18
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I am actually lucky, since my job really gives me 0 stress. The most stress comes from driving to and from work.
 
  • #19
Astronuc
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I was just wondering, what do you people do to reduce stress/nervousness? I mean, the stress is a standard part of life, some experience more of it, and some less, but I guess we all tend to get nervous often when we should not. (I know this may sound like an uninspired article from a trash trivia magazine, but I can't help it.)

I use to take walks, which relaxes me and keeps me focued on things I have to do and somehow clears my thoughts.

In general, I believe people who have any kind of routine physical occupation (like sport, primarily) tend to handle stress easier, since our bodies aren't created to sit in front of computers and work all day long.

Anyway, in conclusion, it's great to have some type of 'exhaustion-vent', so I'm interested to hear what yours are. :smile:
I must thrive on stress/pressure because I can't seem to get enough. :rofl:

A good sense of humor works.

I take walks, and in fact, I need to exercise or 'blow the carbon out of my cylinders' once in a while, or I just don't feel right.

Actually, I have been ordered to take vacation this year since I have maxed out my accrued vacation - a first at the company. Last year was so hectic, I couldn't take time off, and this year I am committed more than 110% according to our group leader. On the other hand, I think there is a good chance we'll be hiring another friend of mine and former coworker, who will be able to help pick up some of the work. As it is, we asking clients to defer some projects and we are almost turning work away. :yuck:

In the evenings, I read ancient history and particpate in PF. :biggrin: When it's warmer, I look at stars.

During the summer, I garden or do some outdoor activity.
 
  • #20
Astronuc
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I do have someone that listens to me whine every night, so that's a big stress reducer.
Then you're practically married. :biggrin:

That is so much better done in person. HINT!
 
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  • #21
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Oh, I dont get those things.

Do you want me to pull up the five or so threads which would seem to disprove that statement?
 
  • #22
radou
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Oh, I dont get those things.

Then you're not human. :tongue:

Joke aside, if you're telling the trouth, I envy you.

Why would you want to get rid of stress?! It's what makes life exciting and keeps people productive. :biggrin: I'd never get anything accomplished if it weren't for the stress of deadlines looming. :rofl: Without stress, life would be boring.


True to some point. But then again, there are people who don't function specially good under pressure & stress (we're streching the terms in all possible directions now, but I'll assume the point is always clear enough). Luckily enough, I don't fit into that group of people, since I often (although I'm trying to get rid of that) tend to do things just before deadlines, etc. And it always works out good. But when I accomplish what I have to, I get headaches (almost always after exams, for example). So, there's always a way our organism reacts, no matter how good the stress influences us in the 'productive' sense.
 
  • #23
The difference between noradrenaline and adrenaline is the difference between how some people relate to stress, my best advice, don't fight it, work with it not against it. Stress exists as a survival mechanism to tell you when to stop and think and to keep you functioning better in fearful situations, but if you spend all your time stressed out, then this is unhealthy. Take a break do some breathing excercises, then resume the rat race.

Remember though.

The trouble with the rat race is even if you win you're still a rat
:smile:

Meditation is brilliant for stress relief, after an hour of that no one is stressed.
 
  • #24
J77
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A nice bottle of red.

Though I never need stress as an excuse :biggrin:
 
  • #25
A nice bottle of red.

Though I never need stress as an excuse :biggrin:

I had a bottle of Californian Cabernet Stress as an excuse last night :smile:
 
  • #26
radou
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A nice bottle of red.

Though I never need stress as an excuse :biggrin:

I had a bottle of Californian Cabernet Stress as an excuse last night :smile:

Wow, you guys are more sophisticated than I am. My excuse is almost always a can of beer. :wink:
 
  • #27
Wow, you guys are more sophisticated than I am. My excuse is almost always a can of beer. :wink:

The only difference between wine and beer is that it tastes better, they are both a means to an end:wink: :smile: , the wine snobbery is a class thing, wine is wine, good and bad just like beer is beer :smile:

I am always super stressed at this time of year, I have SAD, but I'm so used to it I don't let it affect me personally, in about 2 months I'll start feeling much better. When you have something that makes you incredidiblly stressed for no reason to the point where your housebound without medication, it kind of puts it in perspective I once was so stressed I couldn't sleep for 72 hours, at which point I started halucinating because of sleep deprivation :eek::frown:
 
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  • #28
radou
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I am always super stressed at this time of year, I have SAD, but I'm so used to it I don't let it affect me personally, in about 2 months I'll start feeling much better. When you have something that makes you incredidiblly stressed for no reason to the point where your housebound without medication, it kind of puts it in perspective I once was so stressed I couldn't sleep for 72 hours, at which point I started halucinating because of sleep deprivation :eek::frown:

You should hybernate over winter, like bears do. :wink:
 
  • #29
You should hybernate over winter, like bears do. :wink:

I used to: one time I couldn't be bothered to get off my bed to get a glass of water as it was too much effort and my voice went all slurred. Apparently there's a new treatment where injections of melatonin are used at certain times of day to reset your body clock, because it's still in bear mode. I get by on a light box and strong medication now :smile:

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/press/sad-melatonin.cfm [Broken]

Most Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) symptoms stem from daily body rhythms that have gone out-of-sync with the sun, a NIMH-funded study has found. The researchers propose that most patients will respond best to a low dose of the light-sensitive hormone melatonin in the afternoon in addition to bright light in the morning. Rhythms that have lost their bearings due to winter's late dawn and early dusk accounted for 65 percent of SAD symptoms; re-aligning them explained 35 percent of melatonin's antidepressant effect in patients with delayed rhythms, the most common form of SAD, report NIMH grantee Alfred Lewy, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues at the Oregon Health & Science University, online, April 28, 2006, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

SAD affects many people in northern latitudes in winter, especially young women, and is usually treated with bright light in the morning. The pineal gland, located in the middle of the brain, responds to darkness by secreting melatonin, which re-sets the brain's central clock and helps the light/dark cycle re-set the sleep/wake cycle and other daily rhythms. Lewy and colleagues pinpointed how rhythms go astray in SAD and how they can be re-set by taking melatonin supplements at the right time of day. The findings strengthen the case for daily rhythm mismatches as the cause of SAD.

The researchers tracked sleep, activity levels, melatonin rhythms and depression symptoms of 68 SAD patients who took either low doses of melatonin or a placebo in the morning or afternoon for a winter month when they were most symptomatic. They had determined from healthy subjects that a person's rhythms are synchronized when the interval between the time the pineal gland begins secreting melatonin and the middle of sleep is about 6 hours.

Seventy-one percent of the SAD patients had intervals shorter than 6 hours, indicating that their rhythms were delayed due to the later winter dawn. Taking melatonin capsules in the afternoon lengthened their intervals, bringing their rhythms back toward normal. The closer their intervals approached the ideal 6 hours, the more their mood improved on depression rating scales, supporting the hypothesized link between out-of-sync rhythms and SAD.

"SAD may be the first psychiatric disorder in which a physiological marker correlates with symptom severity before, and in the course of, treatment in the same patients," explained Lewy, referring to patients' rhythm shifts towards the 6 hour interval in response to melatonin.

Taking melatonin at the correct time of day — afternoon for patients with short intervals and morning for the 29 percent of patients with long intervals — more than doubled their improvement in depression scores, compared to taking a placebo or the hormone at the incorrect time. While the study was not designed to test the efficacy of melatonin treatment, the researchers suggest that its clinical benefit "appears to be substantial, although not as robust as light treatment." They propose that the 6-hour interval index may be useful for analyzing the circadian components of non-seasonal depression and other sleep and psychiatric disorders.

Also participating in the study were: Bryan Lefler, Jonathan Emens, Oregon Health and Science University, and Vance Bauer, Kaiser Permanente Northwest Center for Health Research.

The circadian basis of winter depression. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Apr 28.
 
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  • #30
mush999
call in sick to work
 

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