Your Local Cuisine

  • #1
ZapperZ
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I considered posting this in the Food thread, but I think it might be better for it to be in its own separate thread.

First of all, let me clarify that I love, LOVE ethnic cuisine and foods that are local to a particular region. I find that I learn a lot about groups of people or the local culture, or how people live through the food that they eat. It is why I love shows such as "Bizarre Food" on TV that explores different parts of the world and what people eat.

So now, how about you telling us some of the foods that are local and regional to where you live or where you came from? Often times, a lot of the food are so localized, they are only known within that particular town or neighborhood. Those are the ones that I want to know about.

I'll start with the Chicago area. Most people are quite aware of the Chicago Deep Dish Pizza and the Chicago Hot dog.

Deep Dish pizza
slide-pull-1.jpe


Chicago Hot dog
http://fhdeli.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/howtomakeacsd_81.jpg [Broken]

But there is also the Chicago Italian Beef sandwich.
the-top-10-italian-beef-sandwiches-in-chicago.jpg


This is, of course, not "authentic" Italian, because it didn't come out of Italy. But it is still one hot, juicy mess that is delicious. And while you can find the deep dish pizza and Chicago-style hot dog elsewhere in the US, the Italian Beef is not as easily found outside of the Chicago area. In fact, it isn't that well-known elsewhere.

So what are some of the dishes or food that are very local to your area, or something that your area is known for?

Zz.
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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omg I haven't had anything to eat eat today.... mouth... watering...

Here is Milwaukee in a nutshell

Bratwurst
Brat.jpg


Cheese Curds
2626curdcomboweb-jpg.jpg


Beer
DSC_0010-large.jpg
 
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  • #3
Doug Huffman
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We have an unique local specialty, Fresh Cooked Lawyers also known as Burbot and Pout-eel. They're by-catch of our dying whitefish industry (only two commercial fishermen still fishing). K. K. Fiske restaurant uniquely has them, provided by his fishing tug Seediver. There, they're chunked and flash fried and called "poor man's lobster."

http://02.static.wehaaserver.com/doorcountytoday-com/images/K-K--Fiske_Wash-Island.18154.widea.0.jpg

http://www.woodenboatsironmen.com/koyen_op_800x540.jpg

http://ehmannoutdoors.com/sites/default/files/b burbot 1.JPG

Some years ago I was given four filets that I watched taken from quivering fresh fish and they were very very good lightly pan fried.

The community is one of the largest ethnic Icelander communities in the US, with a significant Skandinavian and Irish population, each practices its cuisine. I hosted a Burns' Supper this year that was a great success.
 
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  • #4
Ryan_m_b
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I live in London and there's one particular dish that is less common than it used to be but is fantastic grub: pie mash and liquor. Depressingly rare to find a proper shop for it now, most places to eat are either gastropubs, national cuisine or kebab shops. But when you do find one its great. Especially on a winters day.
 
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  • #5
lisab
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The Pacific Northwest is known for salmon and good beer. But since we're on the Pacific Rim, there is a strong (and delicious) Asian influence on food. Oh and dungeness crab. It's a great place to live if you love seafood!
 
  • #6
Vanadium 50
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Chicago Hot dog
Where's the ketchup? <running quickly>
 
  • #8
ZapperZ
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The Pacific Northwest is known for salmon and good beer. But since we're on the Pacific Rim, there is a strong (and delicious) Asian influence on food. Oh and dungeness crab. It's a great place to live if you love seafood!
But is there something unique about the food in your area, lisab? Or was there something popular that originated from that region? That is what I'm trying to gather here, something that is identified with some particular region.

Zz.
 
  • #9
Dembadon
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Here're a few pictures that'll give you a taste of the rich culture in which I'm immersed:

shutterstock_65792173-270x173.jpg


Now, if that doesn't get your mouth watering, wait until you see this!

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR1MROiVj4uS6-ZPEt8VdfAWhnxadaYN8JN1oBeD-k78ie7eMM0.jpg


Hungry?
 
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  • #11
lisab
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But is there something unique about the food in your area, lisab? Or was there something popular that originated from that region? That is what I'm trying to gather here, something that is identified with some particular region.

Zz.
Ah. Well the lovely Dungeness crab would be high on that list. It's from here, in fact it's named after Dungeness Spit, which is in Washington State. And Oregon named it their Official State Crustacean.

And Starbucks, of course!!

"Seattle" is an anagram of "let's eat". That has to count for something :oldbiggrin: !
 
  • #13
Siv
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This is what I will be making for lunch today, so thought I would post about that .... Kerala Fish Stew


http://mariasmenu.com/fish/fish-molly

There are slight variations but the common thing is ... fish, coconut milk and spices :smile:
My family loves it !
 
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  • #14
ZapperZ
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This is what I will be making for lunch today, so thought I would post about that .... Kerala Fish Stew


http://mariasmenu.com/fish/fish-molly

There are slight variations but the common thing is ... fish, coconut milk and spices :smile:
My family loves it !
I may actually have had something similar!

Whenever we go to Orlando, FL, we try to stop by this Indian Restaurant just outside of Walt Disney World. It's called Dakshin, and they have two types of Kerala fish stew:

http://www.dakshin-indianrestaurant.com/dinnermenu.html

I've ordered both of them over the years.

Zz.
 
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  • #15
Siv
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And I hope you liked it, Zapper.
 
  • #16
ZapperZ
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And I hope you liked it, Zapper.
Indian food has always been one of my favorites, and yes, I did like them. We had to convince the waiter that we wanted it as hot/spicy as it was supposed to. He wasn't convinced but gave it to us anyway. He was pleasantly surprised that we finished all of them.

I hope many others from India participate in this. It is such a rich and varied culture that even the same food is different with different families, etc. I want to hear and know about these types of dishes and food that are very specialized and unique to each family/region.

Zz.
 
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  • #17
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...
I hope many others from India participate in this. It is such a rich and varied culture that even the same food is different with different families, etc. I want to hear and know about these types of dishes and food that are very specialized and unique to each family/region.
...
people put anything edible into their foods provided they won't upset their stomach. The food and it tastes sure vary among individuals. Taroes and (sweet and) Potatoes are used equally in my curry soup.
 
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wirenut
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Unless you consider the German, Polish, and Russian foods that every grandmother cooked for sunday dinner.
 
  • #20
ZapperZ
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Ah yes, the Anchor bar in Buffalo, NY, the originator of those Buffalo wings.

I think that place is more popular than the Buffalo Bills! :)

Zz.
 
  • #21
wolram
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A, delicious meal likely only eaten by my family is couscous with spicy sausages, peppers, onion and chili.
 
  • #22
jtbell
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When I think of South Carolina cuisine, I think of two things: fried okra and mustard-based barbecue sauce.

Actually, the barbecue sauce is specific to the Midlands (the central area of SC around Columbia). I live in a "boundary" region to the north where you can get barbecue either way: mustard based or tomato based (which I prefer). Either way, it's always on pork.

However, I have never cared for okra, whether fried or in some other form. My brother claimed that there is an invisible "okra line" crossing the US from east to west, somewhat south of the Mason-Dixon line. North of it, one never sees okra on restaurant menus. South of it, okra is ubiquitous at truck stops, barbecue joints, cafeterias, etc.

A suburb of Columbia, SC, has an annual festival called the "Okra Strut."
 
  • #23
gleem
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You want crab cakes? Come to the Eastern Shore of Maryland ....no fillers added.
 
  • #24
gleem
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When I think of South Carolina cuisine, I think of two things: fried okra and mustard-based barbecue sauce.
When I think of SC I think of Shrimp and Grits.
 
  • #25
ZapperZ
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I wish we have more participants from France, Italy, Spain, China, Japan, countries in South East Asia, etc. There is such a diverse and amazing culinary culture in those regions where there are very unique foods from various regions in each of those countries.

And hey, how about people from the Gulf Coast of the US? Where are you?

Zz.
 

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