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Your PF password

  1. Aug 5, 2009 #1

    dlgoff

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    Would you give out your PF password to work for the city of Bozeman Montana?
    http://bozemandailychronicle.com/articles/2009/06/19/news/10socialnetworking.txt" [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 5, 2009 #2
    Wow. that's some 1984 bull crap. Why do they need your passwords? Are they going to send some messages as you? It sounds like the entire town is a russian mafia scam.
     
  4. Aug 5, 2009 #3
    Wow, thats is insane!

    So much for a private life, eh?

    Also ...on a technical point, that could be one hell of a long list of sites, passwords etc
     
  5. Aug 5, 2009 #4
    What are they hoping for?:

    Interviewer: Which social networking sites and forums to you use?

    You: Well let's see there's Facebook, and Hotmail, and PhysicsForums, and The Terrorist Plots Against The Town of Bozeman, Montana Fourm... oh wait... you're good you.. you're very good.
     
  6. Aug 5, 2009 #5

    negitron

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    This is not an invasion of your privacy. You have a right not to provide this information and they have a right not to hire you. Simple.
     
  7. Aug 5, 2009 #6

    ideasrule

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    I suppose you'd say the same about overwork and sexual abuse--as long as a waiver tells you about it, it's ok, right?
     
  8. Aug 5, 2009 #7
    But do they or anyone have right not to hire you on the basis of that you are providing personal information (including the online communications with your friends/family) that is not related the job?
     
  9. Aug 5, 2009 #8

    Evo

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    That's going too far. If you belong to a church, do they attend services and spy on you? Are they allowed to sit in the confessional with your priest and listen to what you say in confession? Nope, that won't happen. What if you have confidential medical information which is not legal for them to view on those password protected sites? I predict this is going to be found to be going too far. Ask them what their member name is so you can read their posts, ok, if the applicant wants to divulge that. Passwords and logins. Never.

    My login at PF would give them access to member information. They absolutely can not have access to my login. I'm looking forward to seeing the city pay a multimillion dollar lawsuit in the near future.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2009
  10. Aug 5, 2009 #9

    negitron

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    Uh, no. Don't put words in my mouth; if you don't understand my point, just ask me to explain it to you.
     
  11. Aug 5, 2009 #10
    I couldn't agree more.
     
  12. Aug 5, 2009 #11
    He's right. I'm not a lawyer but to demand your employs divulge that information could be highly illegal. Thus there hiring practice could very well result in lawsuits. Employers (ESPECIALLY gov't employers) do not have carte blanche in terms of what they can require from applicants and this could very well be a violation of state labour laws.
     
  13. Aug 5, 2009 #12

    negitron

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    They aren't. They are asking prospective employees. This is a subtle, but critical, distinction which seems to have escaped several people, including you.
     
  14. Aug 5, 2009 #13

    Evo

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    Actually, it is illegal to ask potential employess to divulge certain information. for example, you can no longer ask a female applicant what the last day of her menstrual period was.

    I'm sure it's not allowed to ask an applicant what religion they belong to.

    You also cannot ask an applicant to furnish you with their medical records.
     
  15. Aug 5, 2009 #14

    negitron

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    This is not correct. I don't know specifically for Montana, however in several states, at least, employers and prospective employers may request medical records, but you must sign a waiver granting permission for their release. Illinois, for example:

     
  16. Aug 5, 2009 #15
    I really dont mean to sound like a tool here ...but are you saying this is ok?

    If you ask me, it would be bad enough to ask an employee for this information, but you may be ok with the people you work for having this information, but I think its nuts to ask this information of people who probably won't even get the job.

    Never mind if it is legal or not to ask this information.

    I do my banking online ...if I was to apply for a job in that town, I would have to give them my password ...how do I know these people are honest enough not to go into my accounts, or how do I know they are not stupid enough to leave my information out in the open, where someone else can get it?? And if I dont provide the information, I dont even get considered for the job!

    And they want this information to know if I am a good honest person ...right? Well, would I get the passwords etc of my bosses, so I can know if I am work for good and honest people? I doubt it.
     
  17. Aug 5, 2009 #16
    Uh. Those laws ARE for prospective employees. There is a laundry list of information that it is simply ILLEGAL to ask a PROSPECTIVE employee for.
     
  18. Aug 5, 2009 #17
    Yes, but the question is do you have the right to REFUSE without it effecting your hiring.
     
  19. Aug 5, 2009 #18

    negitron

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    Yes, I am aware of this. Although, it's not a very long list, actually. There are many things you can't be required to answer, but employers may still be permitted to ask. And as far as I can tell, none of those lists include internet passwords.
     
  20. Aug 5, 2009 #19

    negitron

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    That would depend. If the reason for not hiring you would place you in a federally- or state-protected class (age, race, religion, etc.) then generally you do have that right. Otherwise, perhaps, perhaps not, depending on the specifics.
     
  21. Aug 5, 2009 #20
    Right. Which is an artifact of the laws being behind the times. However, one could very easily find a legal defense. For example, as Evo mentioned, you can't ask about religion. So you could always claim that you discuss you religious views online and thus asking for this information is tantamount to asking your religion.
     
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