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Z plane in vectors

  • Thread starter ace123
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  • #1
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How would one draw a vector traveling in the positive z direction? Would it be a line comming out at you?

So this is just a very basic question but I do not know how to do it so can someone just give me a quick answer if you can or point me in the right direction because my book only discusses th x and y plane.

Thanks
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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In my physics class we used a circle with a dot inside for a vector in the positive z direction, and a circle with an x in it for the negative z direction. Unless your teacher has a preference, you should feel free to make up your own notation! Don't let the notation Nazi's oppress you! LOL
 
  • #3
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In my physics class we used a circle with a dot inside for a vector in the positive z direction, and a circle with an x in it for the negative z direction. Unless your teacher has a preference, you should feel free to make up your own notation! Don't let the notation Nazi's oppress you! LOL
A dot? How would you do the components of a dot?
 
  • #4
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A dot? How would you do the components of a dot?
A force vector that has a non-zero z-component would have to be split up so that the z-component is drawn separately. Granted, this is an undesirable situation that is best avoided where possible.
 
  • #5
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I can't avoid it so how would i split it up and draw it seperately
 
  • #6
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This website explains vector components quite well:

http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/CLASS/vectors/u3l1d.html [Broken]
 
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